Michelin Pro 4 Grip Service Course – Video Review

Michelin Pro 4 Service Course Grip Tyre Review

How great is commuting by bike? Rain, hail or shine; many of us need to get to work and depending on your office location, driving is the most frustrating option. When I started commuting to work by bike almost 3 months ago, I quickly found that the racing tyres that came with my bike were slightly dangerous in wet conditions.

Racing tyres are, for the most part, made to reduce rolling resistance and in simple terms, reducing the amount of tyre that contacts the road is by far the easiest way to do this. When it comes to stopping in the wet with such tyres, you can suddenly find yourself becoming one with the road in the most unceremonious of fashions.

To solve this inherent issue, Michelin created a tyre that not only featured miles of grip but also was literally made out of a bullet proof material, aramid (kevlar). Puncture resistance and plenty of grip, I took the Michelin Pro 4 SC Grip Tyre out for a spin on a rainy day in Sydney. Check out the video for the full review.

The 700C / 23 tyres weigh 200g and are recommend at 87 – 116 psi. The ‘Grip’ version is promoted as offering 15% more grip than the Michelin Pro 4 Service Course and a higher level of puncture protection (through their Aramid HD Protection).

The Michelin Pro 4 Service Course Grip tyres have been spotted online in Australia however Michelin don’t import to Australia and also confirmed that they don’t have an Australian supplier. In fact, Michelin Australia referred me to Wiggle who are also the retailer where I purchased for $52. The Australian price is tied to currency exchange rates and subject to fluctuation.

Michelon Bicycle Tyres Review Australia



Product Details:

Michelin Pro 4 Service Course Grip (RRP $ 52.50 )

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About The Author

commutes to work regardless of the weather and still finds the time to ride hills on the weekend.

One response to “Michelin Pro 4 Grip Service Course – Video Review”

  1. James says:

    Put some 25mm tyres on and run them about 15-20psi lower pressure than the 23’s. They’ll provide a larger contact patch, be more supple and grippy, and probably roll faster too.