Race Report - Heffron 8/11/08

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Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Sat Nov 08, 2008 10:39 pm

GKats wrote:Oh forgot to mention yeah my collar bone is busted.

Also who fromt the forums was racing...

i met beanzy and lang. Alex did i possible speak to you after??

Bugger. :(

I said hello through the car window, that was about it. You didn't look too flash. Glad to hear you're out and in good spirits. You'll bounce back.
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by BNA » Sun Nov 09, 2008 9:13 am

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Postby Beanzy » Sun Nov 09, 2008 9:13 am

Gkats, sorry to hear about the collarbone. Hope you heal quick. You did well in your first race. You stayed at the back for the first half of the race learning, and when the opportunity came along, you took the lead. I appreciated the rest! I have been brought down by other riders, its just something that can happen.

The sprint is just one of those things that experience will teach. It can be a nerve wracking place with adrenaline and nervousness all contributing to "twitchiness". Experience will come.

Lang just keep trying, hold on to the back of the bunch. Usually the first half of the race can be quick but then it usually slows up a bit. 5 laps this week, 10 laps or more next week!

Sorry i didnt talk much after the race had to jump in the ute to collect the young fella Keiran who had cramps and was resting at another part of the circuit after the race and then had to do other club duties.

I have no problem with someone turning up to race for the first time. You have to start somewhere and i started in exactly the same place. The new people yesterday all started in the lowest grade in a smallish bunch with experienced people like myself and Alex controlling the race. From what i observed, the new racers were competent in the cornering and bunch riding. There was little elastic band affect to contend with due to the small bunch. Sprint experience will come with time.

I belive the bloke who sat up the back was also a newbie today. Can't criticise too much. He was also the other rider who came down. Hope the wounds heal quick.

See ya all next time.
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Postby sogood » Sun Nov 09, 2008 9:28 am

Beanzy wrote:I have no problem with someone turning up to race for the first time. You have to start somewhere and i started in exactly the same place.

Times back, one don't even need a license to race or drive a car. Time have changed and knowledge have accumulated. New riders are entitled to proper guidance and training rather than get thrown into the deep end for learning, unnecessarily endangering themselves as well as others. At the end of the day, safety in the conduct of the race is paramount (cf. AS sticker thread) and will attract riders accordingly.
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Postby lang » Sun Nov 09, 2008 10:17 am

sogood, I hear what you're saying.

I'm used to motorbike racetrack days where there's a riders' briefing at the start of the day as well as an extra briefing for the first-timers. So I was a bit surprised that there was no specific instruction given to the noobs before the race. Even a sheet of paper with some tips and hints would have been useful. But then again, one learns pretty quickly when involved in a race.

edit: Alex, I didn't realise that was you I was talking to at the end of the race, with the prosthetic leg. That's awesome, I'm quite impressed by what you can do.
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Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Sun Nov 09, 2008 10:29 am

ni78ck wrote:they seam pretty good stats to me! what is tss? and how is it measured? :oops:

The data is from a power meter I have on my bike.

Let me briefly explain:

Duration: 50:09
Needs no explanation.

Work: 660 kJ
The amount of mechanical work done during the ride (power at rear wheel in watts x time in seconds).

Power Max: 1004 watts
The peak 1-second power attain during the ride.

Power average: 219 watts
The average power generated through the ride.

Speed max: 50.5kph
Speed average: 34.2 kph

Needs no explanation

Now the tricky stuff:

Norm Power: 245 watts
Normalised Power is a means by which the physiological strain of rides can be equated to one another. It takes into account that the relationship between power and the strain on the body is not a linear one (and follows a relatively predictable time course).

Hence, a highly variable power ride, while it may average relatively low power, can be quite stressful on the body simply because the high power surges take more out of you.

Since this ride (like most crits) is quite variable in the application of power, then it basically says the ride was about the equivalent stress of riding 50-min at a steady state average power of 245 watts.

if you want to know more about it, have a read here:
http://www.cyclingpeakssoftware.com/pow ... efined.asp

(intensity factor 1.023)
Intensity Factor is the ratio of the Normalised Power to my Functional Threshold Power (or the power I could typically sustain in a 1-hour long well paced time trial).
At the time of this race, my current estimate of 1-hr TT power is 240 watts, so this ride, with a NP of 245 W ends up with an IF of 245/240 = 1.02

TSS: 87.4
TSS = Training Stress Score
It is a relative measure of total ride stress. It is calculated relative to my current fitness level. So if I was of A-grade fitness but rode that D grade race, my TSS would have been much lower, more like 50 or 60 TSS.

TSS is used to determine the overall training load/stress you are placing on yourself when riding. It takes into account not only the duration of your ride but also the intensity of your ride, both overall and the variability of the way power was applied through the ride.

Use of TSS in planning training is an exceptionally valuable aid.

VI: 1.12
Variability Index is just the ratio of Normalised Power to Average Power. I won't go into a discussion of that at this time.
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Postby ni78ck » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:00 am

Alex Simmons/RST wrote:
ni78ck wrote:they seam pretty good stats to me! what is tss? and how is it measured? :oops:

The data is from a power meter I have on my bike.

Let me briefly explain:

Duration: 50:09
Needs no explanation.

Work: 660 kJ
The amount of mechanical work done during the ride (power at rear wheel in watts x time in seconds).

Power Max: 1004 watts
The peak 1-second power attain during the ride.

Power average: 219 watts
The average power generated through the ride.

Speed max: 50.5kph
Speed average: 34.2 kph

Needs no explanation

Now the tricky stuff:

Norm Power: 245 watts
Normalised Power is a means by which the physiological strain of rides can be equated to one another. It takes into account that the relationship between power and the strain on the body is not a linear one (and follows a relatively predictable time course).

Hence, a highly variable power ride, while it may average relatively low power, can be quite stressful on the body simply because the high power surges take more out of you.

Since this ride (like most crits) is quite variable in the application of power, then it basically says the ride was about the equivalent stress of riding 50-min at a steady state average power of 245 watts.

if you want to know more about it, have a read here:
http://www.cyclingpeakssoftware.com/pow ... efined.asp

(intensity factor 1.023)
Intensity Factor is the ratio of the Normalised Power to my Functional Threshold Power (or the power I could typically sustain in a 1-hour long well paced time trial).
At the time of this race, my current estimate of 1-hr TT power is 240 watts, so this ride, with a NP of 245 W ends up with an IF of 245/240 = 1.02

TSS: 87.4
TSS = Training Stress Score
It is a relative measure of total ride stress. It is calculated relative to my current fitness level. So if I was of A-grade fitness but rode that D grade race, my TSS would have been much lower, more like 50 or 60 TSS.

TSS is used to determine the overall training load/stress you are placing on yourself when riding. It takes into account not only the duration of your ride but also the intensity of your ride, both overall and the variability of the way power was applied through the ride.

Use of TSS in planning training is an exceptionally valuable aid.

VI: 1.12
Variability Index is just the ratio of Normalised Power to Average Power. I won't go into a discussion of that at this time.


thanks for the explaination.
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Postby sogood » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:45 am

lang wrote:I'm used to motorbike racetrack days where there's a riders' briefing at the start of the day as well as an extra briefing for the first-timers. So I was a bit surprised that there was no specific instruction given to the noobs before the race. Even a sheet of paper with some tips and hints would have been useful. But then again, one learns pretty quickly when involved in a race.

Usually these instructions and skill training are guided by club seniors and/or within regular club activities. Obviously, it's still up to the individual to seek them out and get oneself well prepared as much as practical, before the race (eg. Read a book on bike racing). This is no different to the requirement that one's bike should be in good working order. Mechanical mishaps during a race can easily turn the race into a fiasco.
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Postby sogood » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:49 am

Alex, how do you analyze and use your collected power data for this race?

Clearly criterium racing has a different purpose within you training scheme. Are you looking at your sprint power? Are you looking at your power o/p during and following corners? Are you looking at how well you've used drafting?

As you and others have pointed out in the past, owning a PM isn't much, but how to interpret and make use of that data.
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Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:59 pm

sogood wrote:Alex, how do you analyze and use your collected power data for this race?

Clearly criterium racing has a different purpose within you training scheme. Are you looking at your sprint power? Are you looking at your power o/p during and following corners? Are you looking at how well you've used drafting.

Well I check:
Was my IF > 1.05? If so, then in all likelyhood my FTP (1-hour power) is under estimated (IOW - I have become fitter).

Was my IF = 0.98 - 1.05? If so, then the race should have been hard but doable. If however the race was "easy" or pretty comfortable, then again my FTP is probably underestmated and a sign I am getting fitter.

Was my IF <0.98? Then if I didn't win, why the hell not?

If I "blew", then I would look at what happened leading up to that point. Where did I crack and why?

How many matches did I burn during the race?

If I chose to sit in for a period, was I effective at saving my energy. When I attacked, how hard and how long and how did that match up with how successful it was?

All these things can provide clues, although there is a point where you can over analyse.

For me, it is the overall numbers that matter in a race like this, as club crits are just training. Racing is pretty much the only bunch riding I do now days. Most other bunches are a waste of training hours.

sogood wrote:As you and others have pointed out in the past, owning a PM isn't much, but how to interpret and make use of that data.

True dat.

There are however some excellent references for those that want to learn.

I'm going to start another thread on this....
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