Cadence vs torque

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Cadence vs torque

Postby gururug » Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:51 pm

We all know a high cadence will get you further, faster.

But is it beneficial to throw in a few periods of higher torque lower rpm's to work the other muscle types/groups or will cadence win out in the end?

I believe people cycle like this to develop strength, I am taking about everyday distance cycling.

Guess alot of this comes down to individual body types.
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by BNA » Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:55 pm

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Postby europa » Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:55 pm

Nope ... of course, a low cadence does do a good job of stuffing up your knees. I recently spent a day where I let the cadence do its own thing, including nice and slow like you see a lot of people doing - first time I've ever had sore knees and they took a week to clear up.

Keep the spin going mate.

Richard
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Postby tuco » Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:02 pm

I agree with Richard.

If you want to build up your legs go to the gym.

I've had both knees reconstructed. Low cadence results in some degree of soreness.

Using different muscle groups, surely that would be a matter of the pedaling technique?
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Postby sogood » Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:30 pm

It's not a bad idea to stand every so often on a high cadence endurance ride, even if it's only to save your butt. Of course, you are using slightly different muscles and cadence when you stand, a technique very commonly used in climbing to freshen your legs. And given a hard flatland ride, can't see why it's not equally applicable.
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Postby mikesbytes » Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:44 pm

sogood wrote:It's not a bad idea to stand every so often on a high cadence endurance ride, even if it's only to save your butt. Of course, you are using slightly different muscles and cadence when you stand, a technique very commonly used in climbing to freshen your legs. And given a hard flatland ride, can't see why it's not equally applicable.


+1

Should also point out that sitting is more efficent than standing. I thend to stand on smaller hills so to apply more energy and power over them, where with longer hills I will sit. Somestimes I switch between the 2 to vary the stresses.

Cadience. Lower cadience tends to give greater power but at a higher cost where higher cadience tends to be less hard on the legs. All depends on your personal preferences.
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Postby LuckyPierre » Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:33 pm

sogood wrote:It's not a bad idea to stand every so often on a high cadence endurance ride, even if it's only to save your butt. Of course, you are using slightly different muscles and cadence when you stand, a technique very commonly used in climbing to freshen your legs. And given a hard flatland ride, can't see why it's not equally applicable.

+2

The secret to my sudden success on the crit track has been to vary the intensity of training within a ride. I still work at a reasonably high cadence, but vary it a bit by sometimes standing and working at a lower rate (typically on short climbs) and chucking in a sprint or two (racing an imaginary companion to the next road sign). The idea (hardly original) came from reading one of Fred Matheny's RoadBikeRider columns.

Well, that and just more riding!
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Postby LuckyPierre » Fri Feb 16, 2007 3:06 pm

Turning from the forum to my email Inbox, the latest RoadBikeRider newletter was waiting for me - and in it was this:

BEST OF COACH FRED

Should Early-Season Rides Include Intervals?

Question: I'm confused about early-season rides, particularly long ones. Should I include intervals and other hard efforts during this training? -- Paolo H.

Coach Fred Matheny Replies: During long rides in February and March,
we should read 'spring' it's fine to bump up the intensity occasionally. I've recommended doing a short sprint every 20 minutes or so as a way to add variety, stretch your legs and begin developing speed. But doing specific interval workouts isn't necessary.
Instead, let your intensity increase naturally on climbs or into headwinds. When banking foundation miles, let the terrain and your mood -- not a predetermined schedule -- determine when you pick up the pace.
Don't overdo it, though. You're still in the process of building fitness. There's plenty of time ahead for workouts dedicated to developing speed and power.
Rule of thumb: When you finish a long early-season ride, you should feel like you could turn around and cover half the total distance again.

They must have forgotten that he gave very similar advice two or three weeks back. :)
Edited to add
When I read it properly, he's kind of saying that he gave the advice a few weeks ago. :oops:
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Postby sogood » Fri Feb 16, 2007 4:37 pm

The other thing to be said is that stand-up pedaling is very much a part of one's cycling skill set. Practicing and letting your body get used to it is a very worthwhile exercise. I have read that Lance Armstrong does interval trainings of stand-up pedaling, and I think it's for a good reason.
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Postby 531db » Mon Feb 19, 2007 1:12 pm

Yep, speedwork is good stuff.....

IMHO the best type of speedwork is actual racing, especially on the track or fast crits. (and those crits are going to be faster as I've just been bumped up to ACT VCC 'D grade')

My priorities at the moment are a little bit different though, just ridden a 200 km (well actually 204.18 km) Audax ride on Saturday. 8 hours, 8 minutes, an overall average of 25.10 kph, actual riding time 7 hours, 20 minutes, riding average of 27.84 kph. Not to bad for a 35 degree day with a bit of a wind.

So now I can test/retest the 'LSD (long slow distance) makes you faster' theory.
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Postby europa » Mon Feb 19, 2007 1:19 pm

531db wrote:So now I can test/retest the 'LSD (long slow distance) makes you faster' theory.


Except you're too tired to try :D

Well done.

Richard
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Postby LuckyPierre » Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:00 pm

531db wrote:IMHO the best type of speedwork is actual racing, especially on the track or fast crits ... crits are going to be faster as I've just been bumped up to ACT VCC 'D grade' ...

Thank goodness, one less for me to have to worry about! :wink:
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