Should I buy a road bike?

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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Mon Jul 23, 2012 6:29 pm

Yes, the answer was yes!

I might post a pic tomorrow, looks pretty sweet I think. Model was a 2011 Avanti Quantum 1, got it for a decent price I think. Yet to give it a good spin but that will change tomorrow. Thanks for the words of advice.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby waramatt » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:00 pm

Lazyweek

Congrats! Look forward to a review!
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Tue Jul 24, 2012 7:10 pm

waramatt wrote:Congrats! Look forward to a review!


A review would be next to useless from me since it's my first road bike :)

Practiced last night clipping in and out (first time riding 'clipless'). Not too hard but I did have one slightly dicey moment. Today I had a better ride which was good fun. Anyway, my thoughts compared to my dual suspension mountain bike-
- Fast, fast, fast!! Honestly blinding fast compared to the mountain bike. My speedo wasn't working when I got up to speed this morning so I don't know what speed I got to (50-60 km/hr???). I got up to 40 km/hr on a slight incline on the way back without too much effort anyway.
- Handling - Not quite use to the handling so I certainly feel more in control on the mountain bike.
- Braking - The mountain bike smashes it in terms of stopping power.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby wombatK » Wed Jul 25, 2012 7:20 am

Lazyweek wrote:Practiced last night clipping in and out (first time riding 'clipless'). Not too hard but I did have one slightly dicey moment.

Best way to avoid dicey moments is to anticipate when you'll need to unclip. Be ready well ahead of time and err on the side of unclipping if there's any possibility you could have to sop. Practicing unclipping with the bike in a doorway (giving you a support on each side) and back-pedalling is also useful, assuming you haven't got a stationary trainer.

Glad the bike is not dissappointing. You don't need to be a bike rider with 20 years experience to give a worthwhile review. Plenty of people come here with similar experience to you and could benefit if you shared how the bike meets your expectations after (say) a few months experience with it.

Cheers
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Wed Jul 25, 2012 6:27 pm

Thanks for the tips Wombat. I feel quite at ease clipped in now, but I won't say it's completely natural. My dicey moment was clipping in on a steep hill and then realising I was in the wrong gear to accelerate. I just stayed calm and unclipped (but I did think "Oh dear, I'm stuffed!).

Got out on a nice section of road this afternoon and opened it up. My speedo is playing up for some reason now though. It recorded a max of 75 km/hr and I am reasonable sure I didn't go that fast. Then it said I was going ~35 km/hr after I stopped then 0 km/hr when I got moving again! Maybe just my ignorance on how to use the thing or maybe vibrations have upset something.

I think I am going to have to get some tips on pedalling technique now.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby PawPaw » Wed Jul 25, 2012 7:08 pm

the more time you familiarize and practise cleat in/out, the less likely you are to fall over one day. it can take 6 mths.
same for braking. get out and practise, and when you think you have mastered it, push it more by braking harder from higher speeds.
then practise cornering at moderate speed, then high speed, then on gravel.
practise hand signals for traffic
practise hands free riding
practise practise practise.....then, when riding on the road, you'll primarily have to contend with traffic, and not your novice riding skills.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby wombatK » Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:18 pm

Lazyweek wrote: My speedo is playing up for some reason now though. It recorded a max of 75 km/hr and I am reasonable sure I didn't go that fast. Then it said I was going ~35 km/hr after I stopped then 0 km/hr when I got moving again! Maybe just my ignorance on how to use the thing or maybe vibrations have upset something.

I think I am going to have to get some tips on pedalling technique now.

The speedo might be averaging over 10 or more seconds, so if you stop for little more than that, you'll only see the 0 for a brief time. Your recorded max might indicate that you haven't set the wheel circumference correctly in the speedo.

Don't worry too much about pedaling techniques, especially if you're concern is that you think you need to learn to "pull-up" on the clipped in pedals. That doesn't deliver much benefit - your muscles need the upstroke as a recovery period after the downstroke. Most of the benefit of being clipped-in come from being able to push from the top of the stroke without slipping off (forward), and similar, continuing to the bottom without slipping back. You'll make these adjustments without thinking about it - and only discover that you have when you go back to a non-clip pedal bike and find yourself slipping at the top and bottom of the stroke.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Thu Jul 26, 2012 8:59 am

wombatK wrote:The speedo might be averaging over 10 or more seconds, so if you stop for little more than that, you'll only see the 0 for a brief time. Your recorded max might indicate that you haven't set the wheel circumference correctly in the speedo.


That thought did cross my mind but it was 0 for the whole trip home. I hope at the shop they set the wheel circumference correctly but that is something I should check.

wombatK wrote:Don't worry too much about pedaling techniques, especially if you're concern is that you think you need to learn to "pull-up" on the clipped in pedals. That doesn't deliver much benefit - your muscles need the upstroke as a recovery period after the downstroke. Most of the benefit of being clipped-in come from being able to push from the top of the stroke without slipping off (forward), and similar, continuing to the bottom without slipping back. You'll make these adjustments without thinking about it - and only discover that you have when you go back to a non-clip pedal bike and find yourself slipping at the top and bottom of the stroke.


I don't feel I need to "pull up" but I am more concerned about my foot angle, positioning etc. I think I tend to point my toe towards when pedalling and that feels right. If I try to keep my foot flatter I feel like I can't get the power down as efficiently. Also, when climbing, should I be pulling hard on the handle bars to generate more power (the lowest gear is still hard to push up a steep hill!)? Should I rock the bike side to side when climbing or accelerating rapidly?
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Mrfenejeans » Thu Jul 26, 2012 2:17 pm

When Climbing and in general you should keep arms relaxed and don't tense up on the handle bars as it just introduces strain that isn't necessary. Stay relaxed.

Try out different hand positions on the bars while climbing, be it on on the hoods, gripping the top of your hoods with your hands while trying to keep your arms relatively straight to the top tube, on the actual bar near the stem which allows your back to straighten slightly, or just around the curve from the stem. See what works and change it around as you ascend.

You should just sit at a good cadence while ascending with no need to rock the bike side to side (expelling extra energy) and don't peak too early by getting out of the saddle, leave that till just before the top of the hill. Also in your mind focus on riding just beyond the top of the climb, and don't stop the effort until your just past it.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby waramatt » Thu Jul 26, 2012 7:08 pm

I agree with mrfenejeans about being wary of the "deathgrip" when climbing. When you're new at any sport, it's natural to do some things that feel right at the time but are not a good idea. When I started kayaking, I held onto the paddle with a death grip but later learned to relax my grip. Cycling whilst climbing is similar. I don't know the reason, but when you release a death grip and hold the handlebar with a light touch it seems to help you relax and the power transfers to your legs.

I don't necessarily agree about staying in the saddle until the very top. Watch Tommy Voeckler in the Tour. He was up and down like a yo yo. Yet he won KOM. Some cyclists prefer to stay seated as long as possible. I prefer Tommy Voeckler's approach. Do what feels right. Experiment.

One other tip about hills: try to build plenty of momentum on approach. I don't know why, but a lot of cyclists seem to back off and drop to easier gears BEFORE tackling the hill. It makes the climb longer and harder.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Mrfenejeans » Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:48 am

waramatt wrote:I don't necessarily agree about staying in the saddle until the very top. Watch Tommy Voeckler in the Tour. He was up and down like a yo yo. Yet he won KOM. Some cyclists prefer to stay seated as long as possible. I prefer Tommy Voeckler's approach. Do what feels right. Experiment.


I Probably should of put it "How i like to do it is..."


Also Lazyweek where are said pictures??? I used to have an Avanti Cadent 2011 TDF, Never road a Quantum but found Avanti's to be very nice bikes (unfortunately sold it do to a spurt of upgrade-itis, which caused symptoms of Broke-itis)
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:53 am

Mrfenejeans wrote:Also Lazyweek where are said pictures??? I used to have an Avanti Cadent 2011 TDF, Never road a Quantum but found Avanti's to be very nice bikes (unfortunately sold it do to a spurt of upgrade-itis, which caused symptoms of Broke-itis)


I have some pictures but I want to take some better ones. Will post soon....
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby BarryTas » Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:56 am

lazyweek, welcome :)
when do we stop for coffee???

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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Sat Jul 28, 2012 3:26 pm

BarryTas wrote:lazyweek, welcome :)


Thanks :)

waramatt wrote:I agree with mrfenejeans about being wary of the "deathgrip" when climbing.


Thanks for the tips. I paid close attention to this today, I have to say I don't think I grip the bar overly tight. I have riden bikes for years so it shouldn't take to long to get used to the road bike.

I have one more noob question though :) When on the drops, do you still feel comfortable braking/changing gears? I currently do all that when on the hoods and don't stay on the drops for too long. I have riden track bikes a couple of times and with track bikes it's easy, there are no brakes or shifters!
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Mulger bill » Sat Jul 28, 2012 3:36 pm

Just relax and do it Lazy, it gets easier with practice. Braking is much improved from the drops as you have more leverage. This is the beauty of brifters, they can be used easily from both positions.

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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Sun Jul 29, 2012 4:06 pm

Mulger bill wrote:Just relax and do it Lazy, it gets easier with practice. Braking is much improved from the drops as you have more leverage. This is the beauty of brifters, they can be used easily from both positions.

Shaun


Thanks Shuan. Well there you go, you can do everything on the drops. I found today though that shifting to the big ring is a bit tougher......

And also, my speedo seems to be working fine now. I have no idea what the problem was. I did the same section of road as before today and only hit around 50 km/hr (not 75 km/hr!).
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Tue Jul 31, 2012 10:45 pm

Here's a photo of the bike-

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Pretty much stock standard except for a few changes during fitting (including a longer stem). I have put a new wheelset on layby and after that it's done (though I might look into new brake pads if there will be a decent improvement in stopping power). Anyway, I am quite happy with it.

Got in the mode for a bit of bike riding after watching the weightlifting.....went out and smashed a few hills....haha.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:14 pm

I assume it's okay to ask more noob questions in this thread-

Can your shoes touch the front wheel? If so, is it something you keep in mind? This typically is not a problem for me since it's not possible to turn tight enough at speed. Today though tried stalling the bike on a hill and the wheel clipped my shoe while keeping balance. It was all okay though.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Mulger bill » Mon Aug 13, 2012 9:00 pm

Toe overlap as it's called is fairly common on roadies Lazy, and as you've already discovered, it's not much of a problem at any sort of speed. You just have to bear it in mind when trackstanding and other low speed maneuvres.

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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby DW260 » Tue Aug 14, 2012 7:22 am

Mulger bill wrote:Toe overlap as it's called is fairly common on roadies Lazy, and as you've already discovered, it's not much of a problem at any sort of speed. You just have to bear it in mind when trackstanding and other low speed maneuvres.

Shaun


Yes! Like approaching a set of lights at crawling pace and hoping it turns green but it doesn't and then you have to unclip and then you can't unclip because your shoe hits the wheel so you are forced to unclip your other foot which is the most unnatural feeling in the world. Then you lie down in a bike lane. Lol
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby kb » Tue Aug 14, 2012 7:33 am

Since it's not fixed gear, you can always back pedal and restrike to avoid the wheel in low speed manoeuvres.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Mulger bill » Tue Aug 14, 2012 8:05 pm

kb wrote:Since it's not fixed gear, you can always back pedal and restrike to avoid the wheel in low speed manoeuvres.

This is what I do, just a practice thing...
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby Lazyweek » Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:32 pm

Thanks guys. Still to have my awkward "clipped in" fall but I won't be suprised if/when it happens.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby DW260 » Fri Aug 17, 2012 5:58 pm

Lazyweek wrote:Thanks guys. Still to have my awkward "clipped in" fall but I won't be suprised if/when it happens.


Yeah mine was a combo of going from a larger frame to a smaller frame... That'll learn me for trying to for trying to balance and look cool. Lol.
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Re: Should I buy a road bike?

Postby g-boaf » Sat Aug 25, 2012 5:03 pm

DW260 wrote:Of course you should. You might find you will ride more often. :)


Indeed - and nice Avanti Lazyweek.

I agree with the comment above about getting as much momentum before the climb. I much prefer to get as much speed built as I can before I end up spinning away.
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