Audax Rides

For Roadies

Re: Audax Rides

Postby schroeds » Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:51 pm

all up it sounds great fun, with cool people and if you lot are anything to go, by the audax attitude is spot on :D

thanks all, I will join you at some stage
I'm not so much a cyclist..more of a sit down comedian
User avatar
schroeds
 
Posts: 683
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 9:58 pm

by BNA » Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:00 pm

BNA
 

Re: Audax Rides

Postby HappyHumber » Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:00 pm

Officially it's non competitive. You do invariably get a bit of friendly rivalry comparing completion times between a few of the more experienced guys, but that's just part of it for them. Certainly noone in my experience has ever been shunned for coming in way after everyone else. It's personal achievement first and foremost.

I think the only case where you might get a bit of stick is if you have repeated failures of equipment and you don't sort yourself and you're repeatedly reliant on others. This means you'd be taking advantage of their generosity and compromising their own completion chances. Self sufficiency and preparedness is a big part of it.
Do you enjoy talking in circles? Love arguing over silly semantics with like minded people?
Try an online forum today!
User avatar
HappyHumber
 
Posts: 3866
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 10:48 pm
Location: Perth, (S.o.R.) W.A.

Re: Audax Rides

Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:09 pm

Crawf wrote:How does a 1200km ride actually work, what would the average person do, 300 per day?

The Perth-Albany-Perth wasn't set up like that. Day one was 425km, day two finished at the 678km mark, day three finished at 1006km and day four at slightly over 1219km. This was arranged around accomodation so that riders could sleep if need be. By my calculations, that would make day 1 = 425km, day 2 = 253km, day 3 = 328 km and day 4 = 213km. Of course, this isn't compulsory, so a rider could do 300/300/300/300 if they wanted to.
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 6788
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: Audax Rides

Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:20 pm

HappyHumber wrote:Certainly noone in my experience has ever been shunned for coming in way after everyone else.

That's me! and no, I have not ever been shunned for coming in way after everyone else... :lol:

Some stories from the field...

first 100km ride ever: http://casualcyclist.wordpress.com/2009/03/08/beach-life-100km-ride-report/
first 200km ride ever: http://casualcyclist.wordpress.com/2009/05/16/uaf-yanchep-chittering-200km-ride-report/
that time I broke my knee on a ride and didn't even know: http://casualcyclist.wordpress.com/2009/06/20/dawn-till-dusk-winter-200km-ride-report/
that time I rode a partly hilly 100km ride two weeks after breaking my knee... good times! :lol: : http://casualcyclist.wordpress.com/2009/07/04/bumpy-boddington-100km-ride-report/
Lot's more ride reports here if you are interested: http://casualcyclist.wordpress.com/log-of-audax-rides/
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 6788
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: Audax Rides

Postby schroeds » Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:03 pm

casual_cyclist wrote: Day one was 425km, day two finished at the 678km mark, day three finished at 1006km and day four at slightly over 1219km..... riders could sleep if need be.

riders could sleep if needs be :shock:
I'm not so much a cyclist..more of a sit down comedian
User avatar
schroeds
 
Posts: 683
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 9:58 pm

Re: Audax Rides

Postby HappyHumber » Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:27 pm

schroeds wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote: Day one was 425km, day two finished at the 678km mark, day three finished at 1006km and day four at slightly over 1219km..... riders could sleep if need be.

riders could sleep if needs be :shock:


Past a certain point, mental fatigue management comes into play more so than the physical.

I have done my personal best of two 400km rides in the last year. You're getting to around 20 hours elapsed time there - so nearly a full circadian turn of the body clock. You mind does began to go gaga, and you feel your reflexes dulling. This is where it can get dangerous.

The first of these rides I managed fine. I was riding with a good small group playing stupid word games and such keeping each other distracted and amused. The second of these rides, the group I was with spread out between the last checkpoint and 70km to go til the finish. Without having the distraction of others my mind started doing slow somersaults in my skull and I realised my senses were being filtered through clag glue. I chose a quiet, sheltered and dark spot to lay down for a power nap. As I still had plenty of time in reserve, I resolved to stop no more than an hour depending how soundly I slept. I don't think I was in much danger of sleeping too soundly, because otherwise being comfortable enough laying on some diluted sandy mulch, with my helmet as a pillow - there was the odd f&(%* mosquito whispering sweet nothings in my ear.

As it turns out, I managed about 40 minutes shallow napping before another rider came past and disturbed me. We spoke only briefly and he pressed on. But it was enough to have snapped me out of the drowse and feel refreshed, so I got up, and had a bit of stretch, caught up with that guy and just rode it home casually nattering to him.

Some individuals can get away with less sleep. Good ride prep for the rides of approaching 24 hours and beyond is get as much sleep leading upto the event as possible.
Do you enjoy talking in circles? Love arguing over silly semantics with like minded people?
Try an online forum today!
User avatar
HappyHumber
 
Posts: 3866
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 10:48 pm
Location: Perth, (S.o.R.) W.A.

Re: Audax Rides

Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Nov 01, 2013 6:16 pm

HappyHumber wrote:
schroeds wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote: Day one was 425km, day two finished at the 678km mark, day three finished at 1006km and day four at slightly over 1219km..... riders could sleep if need be.

riders could sleep if needs be :shock:

Past a certain point, mental fatigue management comes into play more so than the physical.

I rode the oppy (24 hour cycling event) a couple of years ago in a team of 4. I got 1/2 hour sleep and rest of the team had no sleep. I found out I only needed sleep because I had a serious viral infection at the time.

On PBP - another 1200km event, To sleep or not
With the many levels of riders and paces at which they ride, there are many different tactics that can be employed. Those who go for the best time possible will ride straight through without sleep, which adds greatly to the burden of the event.

http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/08/news/feature-paris-brest-paris-the-ultimate-event_190550
This means cycling for around 44 hours without sleeping. :shock:

As Kym mentioned, mental fatigue management becomes an issue. I recall on my first 300km ride suffering from mental fatigue. My legs were fine but I had trouble focussing. Long hours of being awake takes it's toll. Here is how one rider described the PBP:

I remember little about the final day. Controls came and went, we raided a patisserie to break the monotony of overcooked pasta and sauce, and we rode two-up for most of the day. Eternal thanks, by the way, to the Willesden CC rider who gave me some chewing gum to help me stay awake. My head was nodding and I was struggling to keep my eyes open, so something else to focus on was a welcome distraction.

http://cyclingtips.com.au/2011/09/paris-brest-paris-never-again/
Good times! :D :lol:
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 6788
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Previous

Return to Road Biking

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Support BNA
Click for online shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Cycling Express Cycling Express
Ebay Ebay AU
ProBikeKit ProBikeKit UK
Evans Cycles Evans Cycles UK
JensonUSA Jenson USA
JensonUSA Competitive Cyclist