Gravel Fascination

User avatar
queequeg
Posts: 5349
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:09 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby queequeg » Sun Apr 22, 2018 6:52 pm

CKinnard wrote:
queequeg wrote:
This is the frameset

These are the wheels, paired with Panaracer Gravelking SK 35mm tyres.

The build is Ultegra R8020 Hydraulic Disc/R8070 Calipers/R8000 Medium Cage RD (11-34). Cranks are Rotor 3D24 with a Power2max NGeco spider & Praxis Buzz Chainrings (50/34), and running the RT800 Ice-Tech Disc Rotors

Will be running with 3T Superghiaia bars.

I am looking to throw on some SKS guards and a Dyno Light once I get myself sorted, and it can take a rack as well, but I am thinking this will more of a bikepacking bike with framebags rather than panniers.


wow....looks like $10k++
Got a size and weight on the frame...bugger how about the whole bike?
forks?
I've often thought about a dynamo hub. but will wait until I am likely spending 2-3 nights away. Though it is a nuisance to disconnect/charge/connect garmin, phone, 4 lights 2-3x/ a week (and remember when it needs doing),
Any idea how many watts the dynamo adds to resistance?
I like the shallow drop and splay of the bars too. I see so many guys on long rides hardly ever use the drops, which defeats the purpose of them. hard core roadies also tend to be excessively wide for commuting and urban roads. The width is to give greater leverage out of the saddle, but I'd rather the advantage of narrow bars to stay safer on busy narrow roads.

If you are building that, you just have to get that leg better. You obviously have a lot of cycling passion yet to burn.


The frameset comes with a Mason Parallax fork, which is a custom fork designed by Mason to run with all their framesets. 12x100 Thru-Axle, flat mount discs, mudguard mounts (on the inside of the fork arms), plus a threaded fork crown for Dyno light mounting, and internal cable routing for clean lines.

I have no idea what the all up weight will be. I am getting a 56cm frame. It will be 1 of 2 frames in the country, and these are low volume custom made, so it will be pretty unique.

I reckon $10k by the time it’s done is about right. The frameset alone works out to at least $6k, maybe more depending on shipping & customs charges, so it could go higher. A good Dyno light will set me back another $400 too, but I am holding off on that until after the build, as I am a little way off overnight adventures right now.

Riding is a way of life for me, helping immensely with mental health. Not going to let a dodgy leg stop me from riding. The bike build has been a project to keep me occupied while I deal with the recovery. I have been back on the bike for a few weeks, so now I know roughly where I stand and just need to resolve the blocked vein to return to normal.

The dyno hub adds bugger all resistance to the rider. The wheels have a SonDelux hub, so I should be set.
'11 Lynskey Cooper CX, '00 Hillbrick Steel Racing (Total Rebuild '10), '15 Cervelo S5

owly
Posts: 125
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Inglewood

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby owly » Sun Apr 22, 2018 7:05 pm

A ti Bokeh. Very nice!

What seatpost and saddle?
MUFC :twisted:

User avatar
queequeg
Posts: 5349
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:09 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby queequeg » Sun Apr 22, 2018 7:26 pm

owly wrote:A ti Bokeh. Very nice!

What seatpost and saddle?


Frameset comes with a Mason 20mm setback carbon post. However, my bikefit looks like a 0mm offset is required, so will be fitting a 3T Stylus post instead.
Saddle is a Romin Pro Evo with Carbon Rails.
'11 Lynskey Cooper CX, '00 Hillbrick Steel Racing (Total Rebuild '10), '15 Cervelo S5

Uncle Just
Posts: 800
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:54 pm

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby Uncle Just » Sun Apr 22, 2018 9:02 pm

Image

I thought I know that bike. Googled the image and it came back with Best guess for this image: Tractor :lol:
Then I went to CGOAB and found the pic. Welcome back Pete.

CKinnard
Posts: 3008
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:23 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby CKinnard » Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:34 pm

queequeg wrote:The dyno hub adds bugger all resistance to the rider. The wheels have a SonDelux hub, so I should be set.


I found this article clarifies.
https://www.cyclingabout.com/dynamo-hub ... b-testing/

User avatar
Duck!
Expert
Posts: 7040
Joined: Tue May 21, 2013 8:21 pm
Location: On The Tools

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby Duck! » Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:39 pm

CKinnard wrote:Gravel Grinder advantages:
... breaking quicker...

That's an advantage?? :shock: I wouldn't consider breaking in any capacity any advantage at all. In fact it's an extreme disadvantage.
I had a thought, but it got run over as it crossed my mind.

ironhanglider
Posts: 2357
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 9:44 pm
Location: Middle East, Melbourne

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby ironhanglider » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:14 pm

CKinnard wrote:
queequeg wrote:The dyno hub adds bugger all resistance to the rider. The wheels have a SonDelux hub, so I should be set.


I found this article clarifies.
https://www.cyclingabout.com/dynamo-hub ... b-testing/


I see in the comments under the article a reference to a design flaw in the test meaning that the hubs are actually better with lights than with a simple 12 ohm resister as tested, meaning that there is even less drag at speed than shown in this test.

In any case whilst I know that there is at least a 3W difference between having my light on or off in daylight I am unable to tell whether the light is on or off without looking. Since I can't tell the difference I run my lights all the time when commuting.

IMO anyone who cites drag as the main reason for not using a dynohub should be wearing a skin suit.

On the other hand I wouldn't choose to use the dynohub wheels on my race bike, marginal gains and all that...


Cheers,

Cameron
Image

User avatar
Defy The Odds
Posts: 376
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:00 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby Defy The Odds » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:59 pm

I've ridden a Giant Defy Composite for a few years now which I have set up aggressively and enjoy.

I had the opportunity to purchase a new bike and wasn't even considering a gravel or CX bike but after seeing one in the shop and then 2 test rides later I was all for it.

I bought a Giant Toughroad - see reveiw

http://www.bicycles.net.au/forums/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=97225

All the opinions on why are very valid. They make a solid case for themselves.

Roads in the suburbs just about anywhere are full of debris, car drivers are becoming more aggressive, and since having mine I have explored more paths than ever because I can and dont have to worry that I will be stuck wherever I end up.

You tend to forget about PR's and KOM's and focus on having fun. Back to basics in a way.

They are the most versatile bikes available today and if you have a second set of wheels for road/bunch rides they can really be a do-it-all bike.

Definately a case for them and not just "marketing hype" in my opinion

User avatar
cancan64
Posts: 1722
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:13 pm
Location: Auckland

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby cancan64 » Mon Apr 23, 2018 10:50 am

CKinnard wrote: I don't feel comfortable jumping on a $5000+ roadie with deep section wheels to ride down the local shops, cafe, mate's place.


My roadie just collects dust, this is my latest Gravel bike which doubles as commuter, roadie..everything bike.
CX bike has gone, steel gravel bike will be gone tomorrow, road bike is kept as a spare or summer hills, 29er is set up for partner for trail rides... rest has gone... the pic has gravel wheels, I have commuting wheels and will have carbon road wheels when I have the hubs converted to thru-axle... cost way more than $5000 and happy to ride it any where and any conditions... well once the body has healed

“Some say he isn’t machine washable, and all his potted plants are called ‘Steve’.

caneye
Posts: 583
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2014 12:32 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby caneye » Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:41 pm

cancan64 wrote:My roadie just collects dust, this is my latest Gravel bike which doubles as commuter, roadie..everything bike.
CX bike has gone, steel gravel bike will be gone tomorrow, road bike is kept as a spare or summer hills, 29er is set up for partner for trail rides... rest has gone... the pic has gravel wheels, I have commuting wheels and will have carbon road wheels when I have the hubs converted to thru-axle... cost way more than $5000 and happy to ride it any where and any conditions... well once the body has healed



cancan - what are your thoughts on how fat the tyres should go and air pressure?

i went on a short section of corrugated road recently. I had to pick and choose my line to avoid the worst of the corrugation and found myself travelling on the edge of the road close to the shoulder where the earth seems to be compacted and dry (no sand).
Nonetheless, there were many sections where I could feel the vibrations from palm to wrist all the way to upper arm.

maybe i should do more "gravel riding" but i find that my "commuting" set-up was far from ideal
- CX bike
- thick bar tape
- 32mm SMP rear, 28mm Conti 4S front .. both were pumped up to around 80psi (i weigh 65kg)

my CX bike is the only one that is fitted with wider tyres. my road bikes are mainly 23-25mm tyres.
also, i was reluctant to drop the air pressure further because only 10km out of my 85km ride was on loose surface and i had to climb both sides of Galston Gorge.

User avatar
RonK
Posts: 10319
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: If you need to know, ask me
Contact:

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby RonK » Mon Apr 23, 2018 4:29 pm

caneye wrote:- 32mm SMP rear, 28mm Conti 4S front .. both were pumped up to around 80psi (i weigh 65kg)

I run 32mm tyres at 60 psi for sealed roads, 50 for gravel. And with a lot more weight on the bike. I find 32mm tyres require a lot of concentration on loose surfaces to avoid front end washouts.

My preference is for a tyre width of around 44mm with at least small side lugs for edge grip. These can be run at around 45psi.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

User avatar
cyclotaur
Posts: 1504
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:36 pm

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby cyclotaur » Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:48 pm

Defy The Odds wrote:...
All the opinions on why are very valid. They make a solid case for themselves.

Roads in the suburbs just about anywhere are full of debris, car drivers are becoming more aggressive, and since having mine I have explored more paths than ever because I can and don't have to worry that I will be stuck wherever I end up.

You tend to forget about PR's and KOM's and focus on having fun. Back to basics in a way.

They are the most versatile bikes available today and if you have a second set of wheels for road/bunch rides they can really be a do-it-all bike.

Definitely a case for them and not just "marketing hype" in my opinion

Agree - although....with some qualification. I currently have two bikes - 2017 Diverge E5 (alu) 105 Disc gravel bike, and an older 2011 Cannondale CAADX 105.

In my price range, which is way below the exotic builds outlined so far on here (and pretty much restricted to alu frames) the gravel bike is about +1kg over my CX bike, which is about +1kg over an equivalent road bike. Where I could eliminate most of the diff between CX and roadie with a schmick set of road wheels on the CX, I'm still well over 9kgs with even lighter wheels on the gravel bike. I think the gravel/all-rounder bikes are built a little more ruggedly (heavier) than CX bikes.

This extra weight makes it a bit of a slug uphill on long mountain endurance rides. OTOH, the slightly more 'road' geo of the gravel bike means it handles better on descents and is therefore faster, and less demanding (read 'safer'...) going downhill. So it's a 'swings & roundabouts' thing really, unless you can get into the higher price range and go for carbon frames.

I like the Diverge, but I'm still undecided as to whether I could make my gravel bike my one and only do-it-all bike. If my CX had discs, I would probably go back to the one bike. Interestingly the newer CAADX has more 'road-like' geometry, so would probably suit my overall purposes better, from the point of view of having a single bike.

No doubt others may have differing situations/opinions, but that's my current read on it.
Here's my blog - A bit of fun :)
"Riding not racing...."

User avatar
queequeg
Posts: 5349
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:09 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby queequeg » Mon Apr 23, 2018 6:01 pm

cyclotaur wrote:In my price range, which is way below the exotic builds outlined so far on here (and pretty much restricted to alu frames) the gravel bike is about +1kg over my CX bike, which is about +1kg over an equivalent road bike. Where I could eliminate most of the diff between CX and roadie with a schmick set of road wheels on the CX, I'm still well over 9kgs with even lighter wheels on the gravel bike. I think the gravel/all-rounder bikes are built a little more ruggedly (heavier) than CX bikes.


For those with shallower pockets, Mason actually does primarily Steel and Alu bikes. The Alu version of the frameset I am getting is substantially more budget friendly, and they do a nice bundle with the frameset and bare wheels: https://masoncycles.cc/products/bokeh-rolling-chassis
Cetainly, if I wasn't set on getting another Titanium frame, I would have gone with the Alu version.
'11 Lynskey Cooper CX, '00 Hillbrick Steel Racing (Total Rebuild '10), '15 Cervelo S5

NASHIE
Posts: 646
Joined: Tue Jun 04, 2013 9:16 pm
Location: Perth, WA

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby NASHIE » Mon Apr 23, 2018 6:43 pm

Scintilla wrote:26x2.0 Schwalbe. Rode the tarmac all the way from Geelong to Adelaide and beyond. Fun in the mud on the Mawson Trail. You make of the bike what you desire. The tyre width is often a minor factor.

Image


My first full time work pay cheque many years ago, was spent on a new Red Giant Sedona MTB. To date the first and last new bike i ever bought. Loved the bike and the colour. Unfortunately it was stolen many years later. Wish i still had it. Great to see one still going strongly

Scintilla
Posts: 279
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2018 5:36 pm

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby Scintilla » Mon Apr 23, 2018 7:07 pm

NASHIE wrote:My first full time work pay cheque many years ago, was spent on a new Red Giant Sedona MTB. To date the first and last new bike i ever bought. Loved the bike and the colour. Unfortunately it was stolen many years later. Wish i still had it. Great to see one still going strongly

This photo was taken 8 years ago. My son still tours on this frame from 1993 (now equipped with Rohloff 500/14). He's just returned today from a week touring from Swan Hill to Warnambool.

CKinnard
Posts: 3008
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:23 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby CKinnard » Mon Apr 23, 2018 7:15 pm

Duck! wrote:
CKinnard wrote:Gravel Grinder advantages:
... breaking quicker...

That's an advantage?? :shock: I wouldn't consider breaking in any capacity any advantage at all. In fact it's an extreme disadvantage.


yep, can't stop old age! I find myself often mispelling words I've never muffed before.

NASHIE
Posts: 646
Joined: Tue Jun 04, 2013 9:16 pm
Location: Perth, WA

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby NASHIE » Mon Apr 23, 2018 7:24 pm

Scintilla wrote:
NASHIE wrote:My first full time work pay cheque many years ago, was spent on a new Red Giant Sedona MTB. To date the first and last new bike i ever bought. Loved the bike and the colour. Unfortunately it was stolen many years later. Wish i still had it. Great to see one still going strongly

This photo was taken 8 years ago. My son still tours on this frame from 1993 (now equipped with Rohloff 500/14). He's just returned today from a week touring from Swan Hill to Warnambool.


Thats great its still in use. It was a good tough frame, the paint was so deep and thick. I think i bought mine 1991/92 and payed around the $900-$1000 mark.

CKinnard
Posts: 3008
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:23 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby CKinnard » Mon Apr 23, 2018 7:38 pm

Defy The Odds wrote:Roads in the suburbs just about anywhere are full of debris, car drivers are becoming more aggressive, and since having mine I have explored more paths than ever because I can and dont have to worry that I will be stuck wherever I end up.

You tend to forget about PR's and KOM's and focus on having fun. Back to basics in a way.

They are the most versatile bikes available today and if you have a second set of wheels for road/bunch rides they can really be a do-it-all bike.


+1
I'm in my late 50s now, need more energy for work, so am not doing 250+km a week as I was 5-15 years ago...not interested in racing, nor doing bunch (of ego) rides.
preferring a mix of riding rather than clocking up tarmac k's for the sake of 'fitness'.
the gravel bike helps remind me the journey is as important as the destination.

Several times I've also ridden 20+km into Brisbane CBD late arvo to some function/dinner, and ridden back out in the evening. That's when I really appreciate my 42mm tires. I never feel like I am going to get them caught in a difficult to see at night rut, or wash out on wet roads.

As for tire pressures, I run the 42mm at 60psi when mainly on tarmac, and am happy to ride as low as 45psi on fire trails. ( I weigh 85kg)
The 42mm are knobblies btw, but the rear knobs are worn down. Have never had a puncture.

User avatar
Defy The Odds
Posts: 376
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:00 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby Defy The Odds » Mon Apr 23, 2018 8:46 pm

cyclotaur wrote:
Defy The Odds wrote:...
All the opinions on why are very valid. They make a solid case for themselves.

Roads in the suburbs just about anywhere are full of debris, car drivers are becoming more aggressive, and since having mine I have explored more paths than ever because I can and don't have to worry that I will be stuck wherever I end up.

You tend to forget about PR's and KOM's and focus on having fun. Back to basics in a way.

They are the most versatile bikes available today and if you have a second set of wheels for road/bunch rides they can really be a do-it-all bike.

Definitely a case for them and not just "marketing hype" in my opinion

Agree - although....with some qualification. I currently have two bikes - 2017 Diverge E5 (alu) 105 Disc gravel bike, and an older 2011 Cannondale CAADX 105.

In my price range, which is way below the exotic builds outlined so far on here (and pretty much restricted to alu frames) the gravel bike is about +1kg over my CX bike, which is about +1kg over an equivalent road bike. Where I could eliminate most of the diff between CX and roadie with a schmick set of road wheels on the CX, I'm still well over 9kgs with even lighter wheels on the gravel bike. I think the gravel/all-rounder bikes are built a little more ruggedly (heavier) than CX bikes.

This extra weight makes it a bit of a slug uphill on long mountain endurance rides. OTOH, the slightly more 'road' geo of the gravel bike means it handles better on descents and is therefore faster, and less demanding (read 'safer'...) going downhill. So it's a 'swings & roundabouts' thing really, unless you can get into the higher price range and go for carbon frames.

I like the Diverge, but I'm still undecided as to whether I could make my gravel bike my one and only do-it-all bike. If my CX had discs, I would probably go back to the one bike. Interestingly the newer CAADX has more 'road-like' geometry, so would probably suit my overall purposes better, from the point of view of having a single bike.

No doubt others may have differing situations/opinions, but that's my current read on it.


For me, my Defy Comp is around 8.3kg with bottle cages and garmin mount. Its not super light

My Toughroad is 9.8kg with bottle cage.

The wheels on the Toughroad are about 2.5kg so if I can save 1kg on the lighter wheels it would be fairly close to my Defy.

In my opinion, if I was you I'd keep the Diverge. Great bikes and this waa my other choice when looking at gravel bikes. The hydro discs on the Giant swayed me in the end.

But I'm with you, I can't afford any of the exotic carbon stuff but to be honest I like the rugged build of the Giant alu

User avatar
cyclotaur
Posts: 1504
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:36 pm

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby cyclotaur » Mon Apr 23, 2018 11:18 pm

queequeg wrote:...
For those with shallower pockets, Mason actually does primarily Steel and Alu bikes. The Alu version of the frameset I am getting is substantially more budget friendly, and they do a nice bundle with the frameset and bare wheels: https://masoncycles.cc/products/bokeh-rolling-chassis
Certainly, if I wasn't set on getting another Titanium frame, I would have gone with the Alu version.

Their cheapest build is still ~2x my max budget. For any bike. Though I guess if I was to have only one bike....? :wink:

The good thing about gravel bikes is that most of the ride quality/capability on rougher terrain (which is what everyone wants) is due to comfy geo, fatter tyres and lower pressures, which are essentially free features. Each to his own $$-wise, but the light/strong/cheap/versatile value sweet-spot is waaay below the cost of Mason's boutique offerings.

But there's obviously a niche market for Mason and other high-end bikes, and a satisfaction gained in building up such a beast.
Here's my blog - A bit of fun :)
"Riding not racing...."

User avatar
queequeg
Posts: 5349
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:09 am

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby queequeg » Tue Apr 24, 2018 12:16 am

cyclotaur wrote:Their cheapest build is still ~2x my max budget. For any bike. Though I guess if I was to have only one bike....? :wink:

The good thing about gravel bikes is that most of the ride quality/capability on rougher terrain (which is what everyone wants) is due to comfy geo, fatter tyres and lower pressures, which are essentially free features. Each to his own $$-wise, but the light/strong/cheap/versatile value sweet-spot is waaay below the cost of Mason's boutique offerings.

But there's obviously a niche market for Mason and other high-end bikes, and a satisfaction gained in building up such a beast.


Yes, the Mason’s are certainly aimed at the high end. I guess I reached the point where I’d had enough riding on lower end bikes, having broken a number of them due to overuse.

The Mason would be my first high end build. Buying it in pieces over the last 7 months has certainly helped spread the cost out, but a large chunk of the cost was due to some money my late grandmother left me. Rather than just use the cash for general expenses or whatever, I converted it into a U.K. Titanium frame, so her memory will live on in it. That’s the main reason I went boutique, so that it wasn’t just another bike. I topped up the funds by getting rid of my Cervelo S5 and Carbon Wheels. That was a fast bike, but it had no soul and I don’t see myself racing for some time, if ever.
'11 Lynskey Cooper CX, '00 Hillbrick Steel Racing (Total Rebuild '10), '15 Cervelo S5

User avatar
10speedsemiracer
Posts: 1223
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2017 7:38 pm
Location: Melbourne, in the suburbs, near some hills

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Tue Apr 24, 2018 12:27 am

deleted text. Supposedly humorous, in hindsight, wasn't.
Last edited by 10speedsemiracer on Tue Apr 24, 2018 12:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
Mmm, SunTour

User avatar
10speedsemiracer
Posts: 1223
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2017 7:38 pm
Location: Melbourne, in the suburbs, near some hills

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Tue Apr 24, 2018 12:39 am

Arbuckle23 wrote:
Marketing is all about that.
Keep telling people they "need" something continually and you will get a percentage who will come to that conclusion. Even if they had no original intention to buy that product.


I'm with you guys on this, and believe marketing is one of the unidentified evils (for lack of a better term) of modern living (thanks Dr Goebbels).

The best example of this is Apple. As an example of the arrogance that goes with the territory, Steve Jobs, when asked how much research was conducted to guide the launch of the iPad, famously quipped, “None. It isn’t the consumers’ job to know what they want.”
Mmm, SunTour

User avatar
cancan64
Posts: 1722
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:13 pm
Location: Auckland

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby cancan64 » Tue Apr 24, 2018 10:44 am

caneye wrote:cancan - what are your thoughts on how fat the tyres should go and air pressure?


For commuting I run 32c road tyres and run these at 80psi. I mostly commute on the road but will go back to some off road detours soon (currently have a stuffed shoulder from being hit by a car so cant lift the bike over fences at the moment and cant risk coming off).

Bikepacking wheels are 43c small knob tyres which I run at 60psi but if I am spending a few hours off road and its muddy I have dropped the pressure down to 29psi (run tubeless) but normally I dont like stopping so will battle on at the higher pressure and will only drop it if I need more grip.

43c is as big as I can go with some clearance, I have run 32c, 36c and 40c tyres and the ride does get better as the tyre gets bigger along with grip in slippery conditions... its just getting that balance that suits you

I have padding under the bar tape on the top of the handlebars to help with the vibrations.. not a fan of corrugation in any form and will try and find a smoother line if safe enough but I also spend as much time as possible on the aero bars
“Some say he isn’t machine washable, and all his potted plants are called ‘Steve’.

User avatar
singlespeedscott
Posts: 5331
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 4:35 pm
Location: Elimbah, Queensland

Re: Gravel Fascination

Postby singlespeedscott » Tue Apr 24, 2018 3:25 pm

I fixed the problem with corrugations on my bike by using a suspension fork. I just plow straight through them.
Image

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users