pedals

miyata84
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pedals

Postby miyata84 » Mon Dec 08, 2008 9:20 am

I am interested to know what sort of pedals everybody has on their road bikes. I have always used double sided Shimano SPD ones and found them easy to clip and unclip. Recently I bought road pedals and shoes( ie not SPDs)

Had first try out on them yesterday and found them terrifying. I have set them up so I can get my foot out easily , that is not the problem. I am finding it difficult to clip in with my other foot after I have pushed off....any advice?
Because the pedal is one sided I have to kick it over but my foot tends to slip while I am doing this. I will do some more practice around the suburb before venturing out on the highway.

What are the advantages of non SPD pedals over SPDs? It's just that I am beginning to think I should stick to my old dependable double sided SPDs

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sogood
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Re: pedals

Postby sogood » Mon Dec 08, 2008 9:51 am

miyata84 wrote:What are the advantages of non SPD pedals over SPDs?

Then there's Crank Brother's pedals. Compatible with both road and MTB shoes. Easier to clip in and out than SPDs too. :lol:
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familyguy
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Postby familyguy » Mon Dec 08, 2008 10:09 am

Always wondered about the Crank Brothers pedals. Whats the connection feel like? Nice and stable?

I have mostly Look pedals. Not Keo's, the slightly older delta cleat compatible pedals. I get the distinct feeling that the pedal/shoe connection is stable, firm and well managed due to the size of the cleat. I now have Look pedals on three of my road bikes. I'd guess the Shimano SPD-R and SPD-SL are a bit the same, as the sizes are similar.

As for flicking the pedal body, practice, practice, practice. I use the toe of my shoe, not the cleat body, then run it down until the 'nose' of the cleat slides in, then click in. Now and then I get caught pushing the first couple of strokes with an upside-down pedal. The key there I reckon is DONT USE FORCE! You WILL slide off the pedal and knacker yourself, or at the very least, give motorists their daily laugh. Make sure you're in an easy gear if necessary, and change up as you take off, just like a car.

I have double sided SPD type pedals on my commuter, and dont get that same feeling of security or stability as I do with the Looks. They're good for that purpose though. They're much easier to get into, no worrying about flicking the pedal over.

Jim

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Re: pedals

Postby drubie » Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:31 am

miyata84 wrote:What are the advantages of non SPD pedals over SPDs? It's just that I am beginning to think I should stick to my old dependable double sided SPDs


My first road bike had SPD's on it - after winding it up for a 90km ride I really started to notice a burning pain right where the little cleat was attached to my shoe. I bought some second hand Look pedals right after that.

...and fell off a couple of times getting used to them. Yes, they require more force to unclip, but it's just practice. The biggest advantage for me was the larger footprint on the bottom of the shoe, spreads the load more (although after that, I was told about "spinning" rather than pushing which eases the pressure a bit). Plus, the Look pedal was far harder to accidently unclip (which happened a few times on the SPD) and felt far less like cycling on an ice cube.


I'd never go back to the SPD pedal. Make sure you buy "cafe cleat covers", those rubber things that fit over your plastic cleats. The cleats will last longer and shop owners appreciate you not scratching up their floors and falling all over the place.

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Postby sogood » Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:40 am

Based on forum responses, people get "hot spots" with every kind of pedal and have resolved the problem also with every kind of pedal. So I suspect it has more to do with the individual and their shoes. Personally, I've found tightening the forefoot too much is a sure way to bring on those hot spots. Keep it loose at the beginning of the ride and leave room for your foot to expand into during the ride.
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Postby mikesbytes » Mon Dec 08, 2008 12:10 pm

We all have personal preferences and I agree that the shoes are much more important than the pedals.

Most of the single sided pedals are weighted to rotate to the position where you just clip in. I would say that its a case that you simply aren't used to the new pedals and therefor clipping in will get easier over the next few rides.
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Postby sogood » Mon Dec 08, 2008 12:18 pm

Is it true that SPD-SLs are better balanced to keep the pedal in the right orientation for engagemet? I read somewhere that Look is particularly bad in this department.
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Postby stryker84 » Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:10 pm

I've only used Look style cleat/pedal, and it did take a while to get used to. The first few strokes used to be upside down, even now occasionally. I've found that if you manage to get a good rhythm going straight off (that is, don't leave it in too high a gear when you stop!), then it's much more natural for the foot motion to match the pedal swing. And what someone else said, don't use the cleat, just used your toe, it's kinda a forward sliding motion to hook into the pedal, then just carry on pedalling normally which will lock the cleat in.

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Postby mikesbytes » Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:11 pm

Perhaps it depends on the model rather than the type, my Look Delta's are usually rotated to the correct spot
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Postby lukas » Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:18 pm

sogood wrote:Is it true that SPD-SLs are better balanced to keep the pedal in the right orientation for engagemet? I read somewhere that Look is particularly bad in this department.


From my experience I would agree with that. The Look's have taken a lot more getting used to as they don't always co-operate when you push off.
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Postby DavidH » Mon Dec 08, 2008 2:26 pm

Don't forget that there are different types of SPD-SL pedals as well. I have a brand new set of Ultegra SPD-SL pedals on my racing bike, and an older set of R540 SPD-SL pedals on the commuter. These pedals may well have been made on different planets.

The Ultegra pedals are super easy to clip into, offer a limited amount of float, and are really tough to clip out of. I love these pedals.

The R540 pedals, with the same shoes and cleats, are a pain to clip into, have an enormous amount of float (including side-to-side movement), and are super easy to clip out of. I can live with these for commuting but I'm not a big fan.

Previously I ran Look Keo pedals which worked well but I was wearing out cleats in about three months. The SPD-SL cleats last a longer in my experience.

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Postby DanielS » Mon Dec 08, 2008 2:33 pm

DavidH makes a good point. I've got the 105 pedals (identical to Ultegra except for the bearings I think) and they're much easier to get into than the cheapo SPD-SLs.

But yeah... the main thing is to practice. You'll get used to it pretty soon. Or learn to trackstand, so you only have to clip in once :)

As mentioned by others, the best thing about road pedals is the increased contact area. They're a lot lighter too.

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Postby Nate » Mon Dec 08, 2008 3:02 pm

2nd week on the SPD-SL's & i'm still struggling :(
the SPD's were much easier to clip into.

read the traffic better, track stand (eep) & practice...

Also go into lower gears as mentioned, so you can actually pull up with the other foot if you miss it.

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Postby Boognoss » Mon Dec 08, 2008 3:59 pm

Nate wrote:Also go into lower gears as mentioned, so you can actually pull up with the other foot if you miss it.


+1. I've lost count of the missed left foot clip-in and number of times my right leg has done a bit of pedalling by itself ;-).
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Postby Ant. » Mon Dec 08, 2008 5:28 pm

sogood wrote:Is it true that SPD-SLs are better balanced to keep the pedal in the right orientation for engagemet? I read somewhere that Look is particularly bad in this department.

The rear part of my dura-ace SPD-SLs are heavier and rotate freely, so fall down with the front part pointing skyward, so when you unclip and go to reclip back in, you just nudge the top of it so it flattens out at the same time as pushing in and *click*.
I thought that was the norm for all pedals though :?

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Postby drubie » Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:36 pm

Ant. wrote:I thought that was the norm for all pedals though :?


The original Look style pedals (model PP296) I'm looking at both have their noses skywards, albeit tilted slightly backwards. It's just a matter of catching the pedal with the nose of the cleat although it would be slightly easier if the pedal were already facing somewhat forward instead.

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familyguy
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Postby familyguy » Mon Dec 08, 2008 8:39 pm

drubie wrote:The original Look style pedals (model PP296) I'm looking at both have their noses skywards, albeit tilted slightly backwards. It's just a matter of catching the pedal with the nose of the cleat although it would be slightly easier if the pedal were already facing somewhat forward instead.


All three of my Looks do this. I kick it with my toe and slide onto it. Took some learnin'

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Postby drubie » Tue Dec 09, 2008 9:35 am

familyguy wrote:
All three of my Looks do this. I kick it with my toe and slide onto it. Took some learnin'

Jim


I'm too uncoordinated for that - I find it easier to feel when the pedal has caught (and like others above, be in a low gear so you can keep moving if you miss the pedal first go).

I'm impressed with the durability of the Looks - they'd done 10,000k before I got them and I've put another 7000 into them and they're still spinning fine. They look awful though (paint almost completely worn off) and the cleat wear issue is a major one.

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Postby miyata84 » Tue Dec 09, 2008 11:28 am

Thanks for all the replies and advice everybody! First big ride with the new pedals this morning. No dramas...just have to be extra careful. I have to say though they feel far more comfortable and stable than SPDs, maybe bigger surface area of the pedal itself? Dunno but what ever it is I am happy with them. Also I have found if you are getting pins and needles in your toes try making your shoes as loose as possible..this made a big difference in comfort levels for me.

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Postby sogood » Tue Dec 09, 2008 11:40 am

When comparing for stability of the pedals, make sure they are both new cleats. It's unfair and counter-productive to compare a worn out cleat with a brand new cleat from another system.
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fitz
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Postby fitz » Tue Dec 09, 2008 1:18 pm

Careful on that nice new bike Miyata. You don't want any dings in that so nice frame!!!!
I recently changed from Keos to Shimano dura ace and find them less positive to engage than the Looks. Practice.
However if you really dont get along with them have a look at the Speedplay pedals as they are road pedals but double sided. The engagement mech is in the cleat.

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Postby bowie » Tue Dec 09, 2008 1:25 pm

...resisting urge.... to tell... how awesome... track cleats and shoes..... are.... . . .


*brain explodes*
b is for bicycle :D

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