To nod or not to nod - that is the question

open topic, for anything cycling related.

To nod or not to nod - that is the question

Postby gururug » Tue Apr 24, 2007 8:45 pm

When I started riding on then cycleway, I was to focussed on not falling off or having a heart attack that I did not acknowledge oncoming riders.

Over time I have noticed that some riders give a nod.

Now i'm not so puffed I also sometimes give a nod.

I have noticed that the pro looking roadies almost always do not nod but the more casual riders normally do.

So, the question is, should you nod, or not?
User avatar
gururug
 
Posts: 1499
Joined: Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:05 pm

by BNA » Tue Apr 24, 2007 8:59 pm

BNA
 

Postby Bnej » Tue Apr 24, 2007 8:59 pm

I will not only nod, but give a full wave/salute to every rider I see (presuming I am not actively having to use the brakes or steer), and every motorist who is patient and gives me plenty of room when they pass.

Big smiles/nods/waves to everyone who should be encouraged in their actions.
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby wombatoutofhell » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:02 pm

i smile and nod-with my smile that might scare people though! I'll also give a little wave to motorists who wait patiently for me to pass
wombatoutofhell
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:20 pm
Location: Cranbourne, Victoria

Postby LuckyPierre » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:02 pm

We had a play with this back in December - but it's a good topic.
I think that it's got worse - even in just a few months.
Oh, that's right - of course you should nod. Maybe a wave or a "Hi" wouldn't go astray and never forget the casual "Morning" as you blow past some-one on a 'better' bike than yours. :D
User avatar
LuckyPierre
 
Posts: 1432
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:37 pm
Location: Canberra, ACT

Postby Mr888 » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:03 pm

Over time you'll notice other forms of acknowledgements beside the nod, for example the one or two finger raise off the handle bar, the tight lipped grin or raised eyebrow. It's very hard to pick up these subtle signals because you only have a brief second to notice before you pass each other, but over time you'll pick it up.

I'm not sure if I fall into your "pro" looking profile, but I done full lycra gear and have always done a two fingered salute or ahve given a hi/hey 8)

In any case, I think that all riders will believe that they've given some form of acknowledgement if asked. I don't think anyone is deliberately out there to be rude or mean.
:wink:
User avatar
Mr888
 
Posts: 409
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 11:06 pm
Location: Glenwood to Sydney CBD

Postby gururug » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:19 pm

Sorry. I can see how "pro looking roadies" is an over-generalisation an opinionative. (I mean to me, it looks like they ride for a club or pretty seriously anyway).

Maybe the faster roadies go by too fast for me to notice any gesture they make :wink:

Now you mention it, some of those people who didn't make a big nod might have made a smaller kind of gesture. Sometimes i'm also distracted or puffed to I don't get a chance.

It's a fine line on a cycleway. I've almost lost focus or balance for a few seconds and veered into a pole on the left or off the path.
User avatar
gururug
 
Posts: 1499
Joined: Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:05 pm

Postby Halfanewb » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:23 pm

there is a nodding hierarchy on the shultzes canal run , equals nod to each other, lesser mortals nod first recognizing the superior rider who then nods, and nobody nods at a noob (or anyone who is doing under 20kph).

exceptions to this are 1. this one old bloke who cycles and karaoke's (along with his ipod) songs from the 1950's top volume and randomly starts doing upperbody star jumps as he's riding and 2. attractive females (ofcourse!)
Halfanewb
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: Brisbane

Postby pospete » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:28 pm

I allways try to say Hi or at least nod, and on some a wolf whistle :lol:
Talk to the hand
User avatar
pospete
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Doncaster, Melbourne

Postby mikesbytes » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:32 pm

Imanewbie wrote: exceptions to this are 1. this one old bloke who cycles and karaoke's (along with his ipod) songs from the 1950's top volume and randomly starts doing upperbody star jumps as he's riding and 2. attractive females (ofcourse!)


So if its an old bloke, you stop to acquire his wisdom and if its an attractive female, you stop to acquire her phone number.

_________________________________________________________________________________
Burn plenty of Glycogen
Frame Size Calculator.....Park Tools Repair Guides Frame Size Calculator.....Rolling Resistance.....Rolling Performance.....Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info
training log.....Body-Mass Index, Waist-to-Height Ratio, Basal Metaboic Rate
Bicycle FAQs.....Bicycle Safety.....Cadence in Cycling.....Types of Bicycles
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14718
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby Halfanewb » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:37 pm

mikesbytes wrote:
if its an attractive female, you stop to acquire her phone number.



Thats a risky business nowadays there have been quite a few attacks on females on the bikeways around brisbane , the police have a lot of patrols out and a number of honey pots cycling the different tracks.
Halfanewb
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: Brisbane

Postby europa » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:43 pm

I always greet other riders, at least with a nod, often with a wave and sometimes with a comment if I can think of one quickly enough. "G'day" works well too ... especially when gasped near the top of a hill :roll:

As for the rationalisations about gestures being too minute to be seen - sorry, that's rubbish. Even if they are being made, a gesture too minor to be seen by the other rider isn't a gesture. Common courtesy is acknowledging the other person in a manner the other person will understand and appreciate.

Sadly, there is a class of rider who believe they are better than everyone else and in road cycling - the are variously referred to as lycra warriors and cafe racers and are typified by expensive kit and an arrogant attitude. It's sad not because it's there, but because the colourful lycra and group riding makes them obvious, it's sad because these fools create a poor image for the other road riders who want and use good equiptment and wear the appropriate clothing (there's nothing wrong with doing either, it's the attitude that's the problem). All sections of cycling and society have their own version of this group - ever met recreational riders who are contemptuous of nice bikes? I have and I believe one of the mtb riders here mentioned a similar class of rider within the mountain bike ranks. I've met some of the lycra set who've sneered at my bike because of it's soft setup, yet I've also spent ages discussing my old Europa with a pair of blokes on bikes worth at least $5,000 and dressed accordingly.

Actually, the best example of this in my experience comes not from cycling, but from aeromodelling. I used to fly control line aerobatics (stunt) and for a few years, was based at a local radio control site. An r/c flier walked past the pit one day and looked down at me servicing my model - yes, he was standing over me, but you got the very real feeling he was looking down on me. Then he asked me how much the model cost. I told him I'd made it myself - a sneer grew across his face. Then I told him that in fact, I'd designed the model myself. That was it. The sneer turned to utter contempt, he turned on his heel and walked away. I later saw him working on his model, a ready to fly machine that cost heaps (and flew damned well actually - there are some remarkable products on the market) but for him, the important thing was the price tag, not the years of experience, the hours poured into the design, the dozen or so models that had gone into the development of this particular model, let alone the thousand or more hours that went into making it. Like the lycra warriors in cycling, he believed that it all came down to cost and image. Fortunately, in that same club, as in cycling, there were enough people who understood what lay behind the model, even if they weren't interested.

Vive le differance ... and say "g'day" to your fellow riders - it may not change your day, but then again, it might change theres.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby wombatoutofhell » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:50 pm

I had a bloke dressed all pretty riding a fairly new giant ocr2 look at me with utter contempt as i watched him go through a red light. i was facing the green light and traffic was just moving off. I would have loved to have seen his face when i passed him on my 80's malvern star, with the blue forks (bikes yellow) and me wearing my steel capped workboots and overalls! I had no time for a gesture-i was trying to hard
wombatoutofhell
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:20 pm
Location: Cranbourne, Victoria

Postby Halfanewb » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:06 pm

wombatoutofhell wrote:I had a bloke dressed all pretty riding a fairly new giant ocr2 look at me with utter contempt as i watched him go through a red light. i was facing the green light and traffic was just moving off. I would have loved to have seen his face when i passed him on my 80's malvern star, with the blue forks (bikes yellow) and me wearing my steel capped workboots and overalls! I had no time for a gesture-i was trying to hard
:lol:


europa wrote:All sections of cycling and society have their own version of this group

I hear ya about those types Richard , Mr redlight is one of them he will only speak to me if its some form of a putdown , e.g on sunday we stopped for a light brunch at the end of the ride. Watching the calories i just ordered a coffee , one of the girls asked if i wasn't feeling well and so i said thanks, but i was watching the calories. A little later Mr redlight pushes his plate of scraps in front of me and says loudly "here paul, here is your 30 calories" . like i said i'm motivated...
Halfanewb
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: To nod or not to nod - that is the question

Postby sogood » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:25 pm

gururug wrote:I have noticed that the pro looking roadies almost always do not nod but the more casual riders normally do.

So, the question is, should you nod, or not?

If you have the energy, then sure.

Those pros are probably running on 95% FTP and aren't in real good shape to worry about formality.

So I wouldn't assume others are anti-social by their absence of response or initiating contact.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16897
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby heavymetal » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:43 pm

I usually nod as I like to keep both hands within the vehicle at all times unless making rude gestures at cars :D

I don't really fret whether I get a return nod. One cycle tourist can spot another a mile off and we usually stop and talk. I think it's the front pannier racks that give it away when we are just riding.

Richard covered a lot above, but I'd like to add a few things. I cycle for fun. I ride long distances on tour because I enjoy it. I don't care how fast or slow I go. I really don't care if my bike is shiny or has bling bits on it. I dress however and usually smell on tour.

These things bond cycle tourists together and other groups have their own bonds. However there is one group that looks down on anything else as Richard mentioned. It's these people that ruin it for everyone else.

I did however have some recent good experiences on my last short tour. I had a good time with the guys riding their top end racing bikes. One guy was riding a $13,000 bike. We were discussing it's aerodynamic properties. We both learn't a lot from each other.

They discovered that riding in the middle of the day all day every day leads to sunburn on the back of the legs. I learn't some tricks for better aero dynamics with drop bars. I even used some spare giant cable ties to permanently fix a shoe to the pedal for one guy so he could keep riding after his cleat broke while out on the road.

The reason that we got on was that we had mutual respect for each other's style of riding, and that we had fun doing it. That is what it is all about.

Kev.
heavymetal
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 1381
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:32 pm

Postby ShanDog » Wed Apr 25, 2007 12:08 am

I always give the nod. I do notice for some reason a large majority of people don't give me any kind of reply or initiate acknowledgement of any kind. No idea why, although I suppose I look like the odd one out in the city with a dual suspension wearing my camelback and singlet haha
User avatar
ShanDog
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 6:03 pm
Location: Sydney - City

Postby Mulger bill » Wed Apr 25, 2007 12:39 am

wombatoutofhell wrote:I had a bloke dressed all pretty riding a fairly new giant ocr2 look at me with utter contempt as i watched him go through a red light. i was facing the green light and traffic was just moving off. I would have loved to have seen his face when i passed him on my 80's malvern star, with the blue forks (bikes yellow) and me wearing my steel capped workboots and overalls! I had no time for a gesture-i was trying to hard


Not me Sir :lol: , never ridden Cranbourne, never wearing lycra. Blowing off the posers sure feels good 8)


I wave, nod or gasp depending on mood and physical state at the time. The rare decent motorist and all drivers get the thanks mate wave as needed, others get shown another wave.

Shaun
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25545
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby sogood » Wed Apr 25, 2007 4:31 am

sbra9635 wrote:I always give the nod. I do notice for some reason a large majority of people don't give me any kind of reply or initiate acknowledgement of any kind. No idea why...

As more and more people ride their bicycles, what's different to how pedestrians interact on the street? Do you nod to everyone you walk past on the street? Or is it possible that their nod was so subtle that you missed it? Don't worry about it.

Although I usually nod or cough up a G'day if close enough, but I find that MTB/hybrid riders tend not to respond while roadies do.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16897
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby mikesbytes » Wed Apr 25, 2007 9:25 am

sogood wrote:As more and more people ride their bicycles, what's different to how pedestrians interact on the street? Do you nod to everyone you walk past on the street? Or is it possible that their nod was so subtle that you missed it? Don't worry about it.

Although I usually nod or cough up a G'day if close enough, but I find that MTB/hybrid riders tend not to respond while roadies do.


A good summary


_________________________________________________________________________________
Burn plenty of Glycogen
Frame Size Calculator.....Park Tools Repair Guides Frame Size Calculator.....Rolling Resistance.....Rolling Performance.....Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info
training log.....Body-Mass Index, Waist-to-Height Ratio, Basal Metaboic Rate
Bicycle FAQs.....Bicycle Safety.....Cadence in Cycling.....Types of Bicycles
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14718
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby ShanDog » Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:14 am

mikesbytes wrote:
sogood wrote:As more and more people ride their bicycles, what's different to how pedestrians interact on the street? Do you nod to everyone you walk past on the street? Or is it possible that their nod was so subtle that you missed it? Don't worry about it.

Although I usually nod or cough up a G'day if close enough, but I find that MTB/hybrid riders tend not to respond while roadies do.


A good summary


I agree
User avatar
ShanDog
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 6:03 pm
Location: Sydney - City

Postby DrEvil123 » Wed Apr 25, 2007 12:22 pm

I give the nod and I would say that 90% of people nod back too :)
Anthony.
User avatar
DrEvil123
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 1:08 am

Postby pospete » Wed Apr 25, 2007 7:28 pm

sogood wrote:
sbra9635 wrote:I always give the nod. I do notice for some reason a large majority of people don't give me any kind of reply or initiate acknowledgement of any kind. No idea why...

As more and more people ride their bicycles, what's different to how pedestrians interact on the street? Do you nod to everyone you walk past on the street? Or is it possible that their nod was so subtle that you missed it? Don't worry about it.

Although I usually nod or cough up a G'day if close enough, but I find that MTB/hybrid riders tend not to respond while roadies do.





Me I usually find it's the other way around, mainly I think caused by the differing speeds of bikes. The Roadies all go by like starships at warp 10. Mind you down here in Vic, most of the MTBs have scaffolding under their noses, so I don't find them a friendly lot anyway.
Talk to the hand
User avatar
pospete
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Doncaster, Melbourne

Postby AUbicycles » Thu Apr 26, 2007 7:00 am

I think commuter cyclists and social riders have respect for one another however have noticed that road riders and mtb'ers who cross paths while riding are more likely to do the nod.

I think the nod however isn't often part of a show ponies performance... MTB or road cyclists who are too cool for school...
User avatar
AUbicycles
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8891
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:14 am
Location: Sydney

Postby mikesbytes » Thu Apr 26, 2007 10:19 am

We have done a good job of beating each other up in this thread
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14718
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby pospete » Thu Apr 26, 2007 5:13 pm

mikesbytes wrote:We have done a good job of beating each other up in this thread







I'dd just like to say it was not intentional, not on my part anyway. When stopped I find all type cyclists to be friendly. I have great admiration for the roadies, who must be super fit to go at the pace they do. Maybe when I have a spair wedge I'll have to consider a Roadie too. It'll be so much easier to give a nod or a Hello when I'm travelling at the same speed. I think Roadies tend to be more social, cycling in a group, and MTbs tend to just go it alone. I will always make an effort to be polite to who ever.
Talk to the hand
User avatar
pospete
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Doncaster, Melbourne

Next

Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AUbicycles, Yahoo [Bot]



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter