Why I shouldn't get a reid?

open topic, for anything cycling related.

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby Guy » Thu Mar 15, 2012 2:27 pm

greyhoundtom wrote:Welcome to BNA, I have no doubt the bike will do what you need it for and the current price for that model is certainly excellent.

However just in case, buy yourself a spare innertube and some bicycle tyre levers as walking 5 km pushing a bike with a flat tyre is certainly not fun as there seems to more glass on the roads than ever before.

PS. I’m not sure if you need spanner with that model to take the wheels off, or if they are fixed with a quick release, if not also include the right size spanner in your kit.


Thanks Tom, and great recommendations. They were quick release when I rode one prior to money-down, but will definitely get some spares, tape and levers - can't go wrong that way.

Lucky it's thunderstorming in Melbourne the next few days, otherwise I would be even more impatient to pick it up!
Guy
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:05 am

by BNA » Sun Apr 01, 2012 1:56 pm

BNA
 

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby Guy » Sun Apr 01, 2012 1:56 pm

Just following up - picked up the bike a couple of weeks ago, and been doing the 15km return commute to the train station every day. Bike has been fine, and this being my first road bike (used to ride mountain bikes in my youth), I love how fast they can go.

Took a while to get used to the seat, but that was expected, nothing to do with it being a Reid, in that case.. However, earlier in the week I decided to pump the tyres up, and get them over their original low PSI.. I knew what to expect... so next day when I went to go for a ride.. surely enough, the back tyre was completely flat. Hehe. Ahh well, I just laughed and caught the bus, I wasn't going to piss-fart around at 6:30am with it all.

Anyway, sorted it out today, just bought a new tube and rim tape (already knowing what the problem was going to be, as per previous posts on this topic), surely enough, big fat gash in the old tube where the tape didn't hold up. It's all replaced now, ready for tomorrow.

Reid - if you're reading this.. put some thicker rim tape on, lol.

Cheers.
Guy
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:05 am

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby reid_cycles » Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:17 pm

Hi, It's James Reid here, owner of Reid Cycles.

Great to hear about our customers enjoying their bikes.

With regards to the rim tape issue, yes we acknowledge this. In one particular shipment we did have some issues on a few bikes, since then we have upgraded to a much stronger/better quality tape.

Our company policy is if we get a consistency of warranty issues on a particular part, we automatically upgrade that component on the next model and deal with the current warranty issue ensuring all customers are happy.

We appreciate feedback and value our customers, if you have any feedback feel free to contact us.
On the forum I see a few posts regarding warranties etc, all brands have warranty issues from time to time. I feel bad seeing this as I would hope customers feel welcome to contact us to get the warranty sorted out instead of expressing dissatisfaction online without getting a resolution.
reid_cycles
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:47 am

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby Gunlock » Tue Apr 17, 2012 9:05 pm

I bought a reid helix the other day and no issues so far. I've been using a reid wheelset for half a year now on another bike and have never had an issue - no flats, no buckling, still rolls well.

Although, i think i'll go back in and ask to swap the wide seat that came stock for one of their road bike seats - purely as thats what im more used to.
Currently riding:
2010 Malvern Star Oppy C6
2012 Cube LTD Pro 29er
2012 Merida TimeWarp 4
2013 Kona Paddy Wagon
User avatar
Gunlock
 
Posts: 348
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2009 8:58 pm
Location: Burwood, Melb

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby CommuRider » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:14 pm

reid_cycles wrote: I feel bad seeing this as I would hope customers feel welcome to contact us to get the warranty sorted out instead of expressing dissatisfaction online without getting a resolution.


Because they aren't happy with the resolution.

I've noticed that the other ever so-popular Reid bike thread here has been locked (with no explanation - pls explain mods) after comments made by another dissatisfied buyer of yours.

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=14609

No doubt your bully-boy tactics to shut down online comments that criticise your bikes/store/service have been effective but it does nothing to improve your image. Instead of blaming externalities - ie customers, suppliers, warranty problems, why don't you do an internal audit of your company such as service and after-sales service so that there are less-aggrieved customers of yours out there venting their problems on here?

As you very well know, an individual customer has little power but collectively with the power of the internet they have a powerful voice. Improve your reputation offline and it might just improve your image online.
Amateur oenologist and green-friendly commuter.
User avatar
CommuRider
 
Posts: 5053
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 6:16 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby jules21 » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:17 pm

i was warned off them after being told they were assembled by amphetamine fuelled trained monkeys in sweatshop conditions, in madagascar.
Image
User avatar
jules21
 
Posts: 8552
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:14 pm
Location: deep in the pain cave

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby CommuRider » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:21 pm

:lol:

Dammit jules you'll get this thread locked!
Amateur oenologist and green-friendly commuter.
User avatar
CommuRider
 
Posts: 5053
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 6:16 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby jules21 » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:29 pm

i can't imagine why :)
Image
User avatar
jules21
 
Posts: 8552
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:14 pm
Location: deep in the pain cave

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby newbikeorupgrade » Thu May 31, 2012 9:50 pm

I've had a lot of fun with my reid but I've been worried about it since it started making the clicking noise.
Anyway tonight the unimaginable happened my single speed turned into a fixie while riding.
Turns out the chain jumped on a bump it's around 4 months old and gets ridden for fun once or twice a week to mix it up.
Went to locale bike shop and they say the chain is worn and not very well aligned and something about the bottom bracket.
Anyway they said it's not normal for the chain to jump or to have so much wear after such a short period of time.
Cheap chain I guess but what do you expect?
I can see how people get addicted to single speeds they are just so smooth...
But either way I'm a little disappointed and wonder how long she will last...
newbikeorupgrade
 
Posts: 220
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:40 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby zero » Fri Jun 01, 2012 10:26 am

newbikeorupgrade wrote:I've had a lot of fun with my reid but I've been worried about it since it started making the clicking noise.
Anyway tonight the unimaginable happened my single speed turned into a fixie while riding.
Turns out the chain jumped on a bump it's around 4 months old and gets ridden for fun once or twice a week to mix it up.
Went to locale bike shop and they say the chain is worn and not very well aligned and something about the bottom bracket.
Anyway they said it's not normal for the chain to jump or to have so much wear after such a short period of time.
Cheap chain I guess but what do you expect?
I can see how people get addicted to single speeds they are just so smooth...
But either way I'm a little disappointed and wonder how long she will last...


There isn't much excuse for a built-for-purpose single speed bike not having a reasonably straight chainline - I'd be more tolerant of a poor chainline on a conversion. My first bottom bracket only lasted me 6 months. I bought a proper replacement and it lasted till the frame died.

Also any exposed chain will eventually wear. I'd look at your rear sprocket too - its probably also had it.
zero
 
Posts: 2617
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 1:54 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby pogojim » Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:14 pm

Hi guys, I had the Reid Harrier for a full week to ride and review and I came away impressed. You can read my full review here:

http://www.singlespeedgoldcoast.com/201 ... eview.html

I've ridden many bikes in this field including Jube Customs, Jelly Bean, Single Speed Cycles and Mojo as well as some higher-end bikes like the Cooper and I rate the Reid highly.

You can see a round-up of the Reid's closest rivals here:

http://www.singlespeedgoldcoast.com/201 ... ixies.html
pogojim
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:05 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby justanewbie » Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:32 am

In a bid to assist more 'new bike' buyers on a limited budget, I'm writing a review on two reid bikes, firstly the Condor and secondly the Harrier.
Firstly, a bit about myself to set perspective. I'm a 21 year old university student (well, just graduated so an unemployed 21 year old now) who has been riding since Feb-2011. I do not race (yet), but I've been training for the past 6 months on a Cannondale Caad9 in a bid to increase my leg strength and fitness levels so that I may compete for fun next year. I go for rides every day, be it a 10km ride to and from uni to a 100km ride to redcliffe or a 1 hour session on a trainer if I can't get outdoors. I am not affiliated with Reid in any way, and have not been paid to do this review.

Condor
This bike was bought for my cousin as he and I almost always go for rides together. We got it posted up to Brisbane (Before they opened up their store here) and we assembled it as per instructions. It is a solid machine, albeit built to a budget. The wheels are heavy, the groupset is very old and 12-speeds aren't that great. Back then (Jan-Feb 2012) we would average 20km to 40km rides at a time. At least once a week, there would be some form of trouble with the bike. Most of those problems were from the crappy groupset dropping a chain, or the incredibly cheap tyres being worn through and blowing.
I upgraded my bike (Cannondale Caad9) with a better groupset, so I decided to pass down my old 5600 105 groupset just to see how that would go on the condor. Not a problem since. However, most people buying this bike will not have a spare 105 groupset to upgrade to, so my recommendation, although I wish I didn't have to say it, is don't buy unless you have a lot of time and patience for maintaining your bike. With the new groupset, the bike is flawless, frame is stiff and strong, handles well, and we haven't had a problem since, while tackling longer rides (60+kms).

Harrier
I didn't want my precious cannondale to get beat around or stolen while I was at uni, and also I didn't want to have to bring a spare pair of shoes (as I use cleats), so I bought the Harrier for my travel needs. I love this bike. When I went to purchase it from the store (just opened) in Brisbane, I wanted to buy a white frame, but they weren't in stock, and the next lot weren't due for another 3 months. So I bought a blue frame, completely customised the bike to my liking (also including drop bars and brakes), and a larger rear sprocket, all for the incredible price. They built it up on the spot, and I was riding within 20 minutes. That's already 5 stars for service. I cover a simple 5kms to and from my house to university, almost every day, and it works flawlessly. The brakes work better than the ones that came on my road bike, the ride is comfortable, and yet strong enough (for me) so I can push hard if I want to make it through the yellow light. All stickers are removable without any sandpaper needed, and the looks of the bike are brilliant. I love the deep V rims, although, and this brings me to my only downside, the weight is awful. Otherwise, continual bike maintenance (wash the bike and lube the chain once a week) will keep it running smoothly and with few problems. Recommendation: If you're looking for a fixie to get you out and about, all while matching your chino pants and wearing a fedora, then this is the bike to buy. Otherwise, it can also be set up as a single speed for everyone else out there.

I hope these reviews are useful for those looking at buying either of these two bikes, and to anyone else who disagrees with what I've written, suck it up and post your own review.
justanewbie
 
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:43 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby clackers » Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:00 am

Excellent reviews, Justanewbie! :smile:
User avatar
clackers
 
Posts: 1921
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 10:48 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby malocchio » Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:14 pm

I've got about $4,000 tied up in my good bike, and about $300 invested into my Reid Harrier which I picked up second hand a while ago.

It loathes me to say it, but the Reid gets so much more attention and compliments than my other bike(s)... the cost to compliment ratio is astronomical :-)

I'm now running it fixed and have installed some SPD pedals on it. It's still a heavy beast and over-geared for Melbourne's hilly eastern suburbs but it's a good looker that (literally) stops traffic. I love the simplicity and quietness of the fixed gear and it's helping my road riding strength and cadence. These are benefits you can get with *any* fixed gear so my recommendation is get a bike that you like the look of, and want to ride :-)
User avatar
malocchio
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2010 2:31 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby ldrcycles » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:57 pm

malocchio wrote:
It loathes me to say it, but the Reid gets so much more attention and compliments than my other bike(s)... the cost to compliment ratio is astronomical :-)


I found the same thing with my $98 Repco Preset :) .
When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments- Elizabeth West.
User avatar
ldrcycles
 
Posts: 6376
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:19 pm
Location: Kin Kin, Queensland

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby sebs » Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:11 pm

I bought a Reid Harrier a couple of months ago.
I've had a total 5 flat rear tyres, 3 of which have occurred on consecutive rides either to or from work. I've removed the iron filings from inside the rims (you could hear them rolling around), but still no fix. Needless to say I'm getting pretty peeved. Anyone else had a tyre problem with these bikes? Just trying to see how common this problem is, and what the possible cause could be (particularly with these bikes)
cheers.
sebs
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:04 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby Mulger bill » Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:58 am

G'Day sebs, welcome outside.

I'll guess at bad luck.

I've been testing a Harrier for BNA long term review purposes since Grand Final day last year. I was only meant to have it for four weeks but I was having so much fun I forked over the money to keep it longer. I won't be handing it back. :)

I agree the tyres aren't the best but I've had a grand total of two flats in that time, both down to broken glass from riding shared paths in known simian areas on a Sunday morning. I'll be replacing them soon as the rear is getting close to being a perfect square. I'll probably go for a 25mm for a slightly more forgiving ride. In your shoes I'd be looking at something like a Maxxis Re-Fuse, I've had excellent results commuting on them before.

Hope this helps

Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25563
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby ldrcycles » Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:44 pm

Mulger bill wrote: In your shoes I'd be looking at something like a Maxxis Re-Fuse, I've had excellent results commuting on them before.


+1, i love the Re-Fuse, good grip and wear exceptionally well.
When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments- Elizabeth West.
User avatar
ldrcycles
 
Posts: 6376
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:19 pm
Location: Kin Kin, Queensland

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby sb944 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:10 am

I've put 1000kms on mine, and had 1 puncture, which I patched up, no problems since.

Before blaming the rims, it might be a few other things:
* Make sure the tyres are always inflated enough. It's very easy to cause a puncture on under-inflated tyres, the rear one will probably cop the most issues from under-inflation
* Be gentle over kerbs, debris/pot holes, treat it like a road bike.
* Use plastic tyre levers to remove tyres, and just your hands to get them back on. You can easily pinch the new tube if you don't do it this way.
* Check the inside of the tyres (with a glove or rag), to make sure there isn't glass/metal stuck to the inside of the tyre. I had a couple of flats with my road bike and found there was glass stuck to the inside of the tyre, that you couldn't see/feel from the outside.

To eliminate factors further, try changing the tubes and tyres, from front to rear and vice versa. If you suddenly get a puncture on the front next time, it's very likely your tyre, otherwise a rear puncture suggests rims, tyre pressure etc.

If you do think it's rim related, might be worth getting the shop to look at possible reasons the rim would do this, might even be a warranty issue.
Image
sb944
 
Posts: 169
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 12:58 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby zero » Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:16 pm

sebs wrote:I bought a Reid Harrier a couple of months ago.
I've had a total 5 flat rear tyres, 3 of which have occurred on consecutive rides either to or from work. I've removed the iron filings from inside the rims (you could hear them rolling around), but still no fix. Needless to say I'm getting pretty peeved. Anyone else had a tyre problem with these bikes? Just trying to see how common this problem is, and what the possible cause could be (particularly with these bikes)
cheers.


99% of the time, whatever punctured your tube the first time, is still in the tire and will do it again. I don't even bother fitting the new tube until I find the reason. I also fit the stickers/branding on the tires aligned with the valve stem, so that when I find the hole in the tube, I know exactly where to look on the tire.

I have never had a repeated puncture when I have found the cause (I used to get all voodoo about it and throw away the tire if I didn't look hard enough for the cause).

Occasionally an area of road or path you ride through is the cause, and I've also discovered that riding in the general traffic/motor lanes properly onroad is far-far-far better for your tires, than riding near the gutter, or offroad near a road.
zero
 
Posts: 2617
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 1:54 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby kanter » Wed Apr 10, 2013 10:23 pm

Hey guys,

being pissed off after getting a $207 fine for 1 trip with no money on my Myki ( I know, it sounds like the classic excuse but my transaction logs prove it, and they didn't care, *insert random offensive content*) and willing to see my toes again, I'm considering cycling to work, from Elwood to the City, so a straight 10 kms trip on St Kilda rd each way.

I tried to fix up an old piece of rust my housemate left behind, but there is no hope, I'd rather throw some notes and get a decent bike I can rely on.
Something quick enough to commute efficiently, reliable and that can handle my 120kgs
So I went to the bike shops around St Kilda to see what I could get and found out that to get something decent like an orbea carpe 40 or a scott whatever model was on sale at st kilda cycles last weekend, I should be prepared to spend around $700.

A mate at work sent me a link to a reid osprey which looks good (that is pretty much all I can say about a bike) and costs $500. I was trying to get genuine feedbacks but it seems like forums have been polluted by trolls so it is quite hard to find out what is real feedback and what's not.

So, does anyone have tried this bike? Any good? What else would be a decent choice for that kind of money, even 2nd hand, for a big boy like me?

Thank you
kanter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2013 10:07 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby Mulger bill » Thu Apr 11, 2013 7:20 pm

G'Day Kanter, welcome outside.

I've tested an Aquila, lower spec than the Osprey but still serviceable over the course of a few weeks commuting.

I'd suggest that you check with Reid about the Ospreys ability (Frame, fork, wheelset) to handle a big unit such as yourself before putting money down. Apart from that, they aren't gold but they aren't lead either. Head up to Victoria St and check one up close and personal.

Cheers
Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25563
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby warthog1 » Thu Apr 11, 2013 7:31 pm

There are also the Ribble Audax bikes.
I have just ordered the steel frame and a couple of the larger more powerful forum members, Toolonglegs and Twizzle, have the alloy version. I think they are happy with them. You could always PM them for details.
You will need to know what effective top tube measurement you need for the frame size. The CC fit calculator will help you there.
User avatar
warthog1
 
Posts: 2722
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2012 4:40 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby zero » Thu Apr 11, 2013 8:04 pm

kanter wrote:Hey guys,

being pissed off after getting a $207 fine for 1 trip with no money on my Myki ( I know, it sounds like the classic excuse but my transaction logs prove it, and they didn't care, *insert random offensive content*) and willing to see my toes again, I'm considering cycling to work, from Elwood to the City, so a straight 10 kms trip on St Kilda rd each way.

I tried to fix up an old piece of rust my housemate left behind, but there is no hope, I'd rather throw some notes and get a decent bike I can rely on.
Something quick enough to commute efficiently, reliable and that can handle my 120kgs
So I went to the bike shops around St Kilda to see what I could get and found out that to get something decent like an orbea carpe 40 or a scott whatever model was on sale at st kilda cycles last weekend, I should be prepared to spend around $700.

A mate at work sent me a link to a reid osprey which looks good (that is pretty much all I can say about a bike) and costs $500. I was trying to get genuine feedbacks but it seems like forums have been polluted by trolls so it is quite hard to find out what is real feedback and what's not.

So, does anyone have tried this bike? Any good? What else would be a decent choice for that kind of money, even 2nd hand, for a big boy like me?

Thank you


Reid osprey is probably a good choice for the heavy rider problem from one point of view as they have a cheap/solid frame and solid/heavy wheelset, so are unlikely to fail in a throw you down the road or fatigue fail frame kinda way. So long as you can get the right frame size. they have 4 sizes covering huge range of riders, so I'd presume any claims by their website that the osprey is good for 6'8" riders to be highly dubious.

I don't think however that the Osprey is well configured for new riders, or people who are overweight and unfit, because the bottom gear is 42-25 which is very tall. I believe St Kilda road is pretty flat though, so in your case you might be the 5% that it doesn't matter for, and it can be somewhat cheaply fixed by buying a better crankset. its actually quite irritating that it doesn't have the 2300 crankset that matches the rest of the groupset, because that comes in a compact which would make this a far better introduction road bike. Just be aware that if you go off somewhere hilly riding it, that its not just you, its the bike too in this case!

Its good to see the carpe has the no-front-derailleur and wide range cassette configuration (less stuff on a city bike = less stuff to go wrong), but its hard to recommend the bike because its pretty low end for the money - ie that spec should lead through to cheap and it isn't. The spec is rational though, the h20 is where they completely lost the plot. $700 is RRP though, and not on special.
zero
 
Posts: 2617
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 1:54 pm

Re: Why I shouldn't get a reid?

Postby kanter » Thu Apr 11, 2013 8:20 pm

Thank you for your answers!

I forgot to tell that I'm looking for an hybrid / flat bar road bike, not a full-on road bike.

I'll go and check the Reid shop this weekend, maybe a few more shops in the city, is the Giant CRX4 a good choice? I saw one on gumtree, not sure what size the frame is http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/elwood/b ... 016557094#

Or an azzuri, never heard of the brand but it looks pretty good

http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/roxburgh ... 1016453009
kanter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2013 10:07 pm

PreviousNext

Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: bychosis, Google [Bot], M@lew, outnabike



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter