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Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:42 pm
by Summernight
kunalraiker wrote:
redned wrote:The most important thing on your list is baklava. Winter cycling is not the same without it. I know this little Turkish bakery in Carlton if you need get some.



Thanks, Wiggle has some :)


Wiggle delivers fresh baklava now? Aren't they just the best? :mrgreen:

(yes, I saw your second post. It still made me laugh to think for a second that Wiggle delivers fresh bakery food now too. :P)

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:10 pm
by kunalraiker
Summernight wrote:
kunalraiker wrote:
redned wrote:The most important thing on your list is baklava. Winter cycling is not the same without it. I know this little Turkish bakery in Carlton if you need get some.



Thanks, Wiggle has some :)


Wiggle delivers fresh baklava now? Aren't they just the best? :mrgreen:

(yes, I saw your second post. It still made me laugh to think for a second that Wiggle delivers fresh bakery food now too. :P)



They do really :)
Chat Them!

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:13 pm
by il padrone
kunalraiker wrote:
il padrone wrote:Mudguards are a part of the Boy Scout motto - "Be Prepared"

Lots of roadie commuters don't use them, but I don't fancy the prospect of rolling into work with a semi-permanent brown wet stripe up my a#$e :roll:

Are they easy flip flaps install-remove ?

Some are, some not. The best ones (SKS chromoplastic, Crud racers) are better just left on. But as I said "dedicated commuter bike" why do you need to take them off ?? Just accept them as an essential bicycle component. Do you worry about not being able to remove your car's mudguards?

Baklava.... yum!

Balaclava? Never worn one when commuting and hardly ever when cycling. I have some under-helmet skull caps but it needs to be less than about 5 degrees to make them necessary. Never use them commuting either.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 9:42 pm
by Milar
I'm a bit of a rolling Torpedo 7 advert in winter. Base Layer, tights, ear warmers, jersey, hi vis jacket... Really decent gear on a budget, just looked and they have all that stuff on special at the moment. (no affiliation, just a tight ass)

Oh, big +1 to mudguards! I hated still getting wet from spray after the rain was gone.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 11:42 pm
by human909
All this talk about double socks, shoe covers, full fingered gloves etc confuses me. I ride in sandals throughout the winter and no gloves.

Definitely agree on mudguards though!

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:34 am
by DavieB
I commuted through November, December and January in Scotland. The temperatures were often down at beteeen minus 5 and minus 8. I wore a full sleeved under armour base layer, a normal cycle top, a thermal jacket and a waterproof jacket. I wore thermal bib tights and waterproof thermal overshoes, I also wore a balaclava and a wooly hat under my helmet. Not one day was I cold, in warmer temperatures 0 - 5 I had to remove layers due to heat. That was on a bike with no mudguards so I did get a wet arse.

No way is it going to get that cold here, through winter here I Imagine ill be wearing the tights and a long sleeved jersey, possibly a rain jacket, don't go over the top with thermals you'll end up too hot and carrying it all...

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 3:53 pm
by kunalraiker
All

1)What mudguards will fit an Avanti Giro 2, also they have to be cheap and easily removable.

2) Also looking to get a wind blocker jacket, any one you would recommend. Would prefer not to spend over $50.00

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 12:15 pm
by SmellyTofu
redned wrote:Oh, you mean a balaclava, sorry.

But try the baklava anyway.


HAHA!

Mmmm.. baklava...

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 3:19 pm
by Aushiker
A_P wrote:some warm gloves and a skull cap are a good idea too


+ 1

I also use a cotton cycling cap when it is raining. Good for keeping the rain off my glasses.

Oh, another option is get a velomobile then you can be dry and toasty :)

Image
No comments on the helmet :)

Image

Andrew

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 3:58 pm
by il padrone
:shock: Logo is a bit ripe!!

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 6:10 pm
by scotto
Aushiker wrote:
A_P wrote:some warm gloves and a skull cap are a good idea too


+ 1

I also use a cotton cycling cap when it is raining. Good for keeping the rain off my glasses.

Oh, another option is get a velomobile then you can be dry and toasty :)

Image
No comments on the helmet :)

Andrew


i would rather freeze to death or just not ride.....

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 7:28 pm
by clackers
I'm still laughing about Barefoot's Ballarat gag: there are only two seasons, winter and February. :grin:

Thermal Roubaix longs for me under the shorts.

If bucketing down, I've got overpants and booties, along with a Goretex beanie, waterproof/windproof gloves.

It's all about cutting down on the excuses not to commute that day. Ideology's not enough. :-D

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:19 pm
by elStado
I wrote an article about winter cycling last year on my website, it's Perth-oriented but most rules still apply (especially rule #5). ;)

Check it out: http://www.velophile.com.au/2012/06/25/ ... commuting/

For temps below ~10 degrees C, I'd recommend a wool cycle cap: http://www.walzcaps.com/caps_wool.html

I own a couple of moisture wicking caps from Walz and they are awesome. Have a cotton cap and also a wool cap with ear flaps en-route which I'll test and post a review on my website once done.

What else..
Fenders/mudguards essential to keep yourself and your components clean/dry
Good quality, bright lights (plus a spare blinky for extra safety)
Water resistant jacket (don't skimp too much here)
Merino wool jersey base layer all winter
3/4 or full winter tights for those cold days, keep those knees covered and warm!
Waterproof covers for your shoes (less important if you have mudguards though)
Thick full finger gloves (I use a pair of merino wool gloves as an inner layer and an old pair of MTB gloves over the top for durability/extra warmth on cold mornings)

All that stuff can be bought pretty cheap online.

Ground Effect aren't exactly cheap, but they are good.. check them out (especially the jackets): http://www.groundeffect.co.nz/

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:34 pm
by il padrone
Don't forget the shower cap :P

But seriously, it works very nicely in the rain :)

Image

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:39 pm
by wurtulla wabbit
Little tip for you tropical humans from a polar human, thin layers as opposed to one thick one is way to go.
For commuting or just hacking about...
T shirt
Skin
Jumper
Cord trousers or moleskin type are great for a commute if dry, they're comfy and warm.
Denims give me a rash on a bike (too rough ? )

For longer road ride on a race bike,

The less the better(but still decently clad ;))

Anything above 5deg, wouldn't wear anything special, just nicks and jersey as you'll heat up real quickly and want rid of all the excess clothing.

Shorts and jersey while playing football at home in scotland while snowing, still come off the pitch sweating like a mad man so would only wear long sleeved cycling jersey and long leg bibs if really cold.
Thin wooly gloves seem better than cycling gloves (hate those things) .

Note , Helly Hansen make a nice walking/climbing gortex jacket that would be decent for a Commute. Has ability to take a fleece if need be but its super wind resistant and great for all weather below say 15deg as its light too.
2 pairs of thin socks are better than one wooly pair !

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:20 am
by il padrone
wurtulla wabbit wrote:Anything above 5deg, wouldn't wear anything special, just nicks and jersey as you'll heat up real quickly and want rid of all the excess clothing.

Speak for yourself :shock: I guess I do see many people riding about with the 'built-in thermal layers' :wink:

As the archetypal 'thin man', in 5-10 degs I will be wearing knicks under tights and on the torso a merino-thermal, long sleeve jersey and my Frosty Boy windstopper fleece. Maybe with full gloves as well to begin with if it's closer to 5 deg.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:35 am
by kunalraiker
elStado wrote:I wrote an article about winter cycling last year on my website, it's Perth-oriented but most rules still apply (especially rule #5). ;)

Check it out: http://www.velophile.com.au/2012/06/25/ ... commuting/

For temps below ~10 degrees C, I'd recommend a wool cycle cap: http://www.walzcaps.com/caps_wool.html

I own a couple of moisture wicking caps from Walz and they are awesome. Have a cotton cap and also a wool cap with ear flaps en-route which I'll test and post a review on my website once done.

What else..
Fenders/mudguards essential to keep yourself and your components clean/dry
Good quality, bright lights (plus a spare blinky for extra safety)
Water resistant jacket (don't skimp too much here)
Merino wool jersey base layer all winter
3/4 or full winter tights for those cold days, keep those knees covered and warm!
Waterproof covers for your shoes (less important if you have mudguards though)
Thick full finger gloves (I use a pair of merino wool gloves as an inner layer and an old pair of MTB gloves over the top for durability/extra warmth on cold mornings)

All that stuff can be bought pretty cheap online.

Ground Effect aren't exactly cheap, but they are good.. check them out (especially the jackets): http://www.groundeffect.co.nz/


That is a very informational article, thanks for all the tips.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 7:03 am
by barefoot
il padrone wrote:As the archetypal 'thin man', in 5-10 degs I will be wearing knicks under tights and on the torso a merino-thermal, long sleeve jersey and my Frosty Boy windstopper fleece. Maybe with full gloves as well to begin with if it's closer to 5 deg.

As an archetypal not-thin man :oops: , and one who is acclimatised to cold weather, I concur.

Below about 15, I'll wear a merino undershirt. Long sleeved if it's below 12. I'd have a good think about adding a fleece vest or (lightweight) tights below 10, depending what the temperature is likely to do while I'm out. Almost certainly wearing both at 5.

Below 5dgC, there's a fair likelihood that I'll stay in bed instead of going for a recreational ride... and my commutes (at any temperature, I have no other feasible way of getting to work) are short enough that different strategies apply. But I'd be into the scull caps and a shell layer to keep the wind out.

Knicks and jersey at 5dg is hard, mad or Scottish.

tim

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 8:07 am
by Kwaichang
Isn't baklava a middle eastern desert? Probably not a bad idea to pack some on a cold morning anyway!

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 8:10 am
by Kwaichang
Kwaichang wrote:Isn't baklava a middle eastern desert? Probably not a bad idea to pack some on a cold morning anyway!


Dammit didn't see the earlier post that you guys were already all over the baklava!
I should have know better!
Cake for all!

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:02 am
by il padrone
barefoot wrote:Knicks and jersey at 5dg is hard, mad or Scottish.

WW comes originally from the UK, so maybe it's the Scot in him :wink:

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:08 am
by wurtulla wabbit
5 deg isn't cold really, used to go out in a T shirt, denims and waterproof camo over trousers on my quad bike mid winter :D.
Would also walk 3 mile home from pub to farm in the hills while about zero deg and snowing if I couldn't get a taxi ! Haha !
mad and Scottish but certainly not hard :D

I am climatised now but still, 5 deg isn't cold while your heart rate is up and keeping you warm !
At least there's not many Mosquitos at that temp , yay ! :)

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:20 am
by skull
DavieB wrote:No way is it going to get that cold here, through winter here I Imagine ill be wearing the tights and a long sleeved jersey, possibly a rain jacket, don't go over the top with thermals you'll end up too hot and carrying it all...


You obviously aren't including Canberra in that. I think the coldest was a few minus 9 mornings. The rest were usually around minus 3 to minus 6 range.

You know it's cold when the water in your bidon freezes


Sent from my HTC Desire using Tapatalk 2

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:23 am
by il padrone
wurtulla wabbit wrote:5 deg isn't cold really, used to go out in a T shirt, denims and waterproof camo over trousers on my quad bike mid winter :D.

These guys probably "weren't cold" either. Not what I'd be doing though :shock:

Image

Re: Cycling in Winter

Posted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:42 am
by Red Rider
I know in Perth, if it is raining it generally isn't too cold, so waterproof overshoes, gloves and rain coat is adequate. When the skies are clear it is usually cold, under 5°. I tend to use the same overshoes, gloves and rain coat, and then add a jumper and/or beanie. I almost never put something on my legs, it only gets down to 0° here. I might try some sort of thin leggings though, and some of the merino stuff mentioned sounds very cosy :)