STI levers on Drop Down Bars

open topic, for anything cycling related.

Reach Brake Lever easily in Crouch Down position

No Worries Mate!
3
43%
Not as quickly as you'd like to
4
57%
Can't reach from that position
0
No votes
Had to change Handle Bars to be able to do it
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 7

STI levers on Drop Down Bars

Postby Bernard » Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:53 am

This brings me to a topic I've been wanting to discuss for a while. Its all about the comfort / reach of pulling the STI levers.

I've noticed that on my new bike, I literaly have to wiggle my 2 fingers on to the levers so I can get enough grip to pull the levers properly to brake. I'm 5'11 and don't have small hands. To me that's not a particularly safe option as I either have to ride with my fingers in the position of having my fingers on the levers which gets uncomfortable as my hands are strecthed or take a risk of not being able to brake quickly enough. I ride defensively and try to pre-empt everything but they are called accidents for a reason...

Why don't the manufacturers design handle bars better in that aspect? I'm aware that if I go look for another handle bar I'll eventually find one that fits better (i.e. closes the gap between the bar and the lever)

What is the comfort level of everyone out there in regards to grabbing on to the levers in the crouch down position (as opposed to having your hand on top of the levers)

Bernard
User avatar
Bernard
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 2:20 pm
Location: Artarmon

by BNA » Wed Nov 22, 2006 11:21 am

BNA
 

Postby europa » Wed Nov 22, 2006 11:21 am

No problems with mine and my hands aren't huge (not small either but ...).

You can address this in two ways. One is to shift the levers on the bars themselves - it could be yours are too high on the hook. The other is to adjust some slack into the system so that you reach max braking just before the lever hits the bar. While this doesn't change the reach, it means that first bit of pull doesn't need a lot of pressure.

The other thing is, you haven't told us what levers you're using - Sora, Tiagra, Ultegra etc are all different shapes, maybe not by much but it all matters.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby Bernard » Wed Nov 22, 2006 12:25 pm

I'm using Tiagra levers but I have a pair of practically brand new Ultegra levers that I'm considering throwing on. I think on the Ultegras you can do an adjustment shift on the front derailleur ie after putting it in gear your can move the derailleur slightly so the chain doesn't hit it? is that right?
Merida CX 4
User avatar
Bernard
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 2:20 pm
Location: Artarmon

Postby europa » Wed Nov 22, 2006 12:49 pm

No mate. On Tiagra you can. On an Ultegra setup (nine speed), it's not needed.

If you do look at the change, make sure you aren't going from 8 speed to 9 speed - the spacings on the freewheels is different and you won't get clean shifts.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby LuckyPierre » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:53 pm

I think that you're both right - in different ways.
Bernard - the Ultegra (and other models) shifters have what Shimano calls a 'trimming' feature that let's you move the front derailleur slightly to prevent rubbing caused by the chain angle as you move across the rear cassette. It works and it's necessary if you try to work right across the cassette. But, my mate Bill yells at me if I need it, because he reckons you should work your front / rear changes together to keep the chain pretty straight - and if you do that, then you don't need it!
Richard - that's right, you do have to match models enough to make sure that the indexing is compatible. It's all 'explained' here
http://www.shimano.com.au/publish/content/cycle/saus/au/en/technical_service/compatibility_charts/road_compatibility.-MainContent-0002-DownloadFile.tmp/Rear%20drive%20road%20compatibility.pdf.pdf but I have to re-think it every time I look at the chart. :?
User avatar
LuckyPierre
 
Posts: 1432
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:37 pm
Location: Canberra, ACT

Postby LuckyPierre » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:55 pm

Bernard wrote:I'm using Tiagra levers but I have a pair of practically brand new Ultegra levers that I'm considering throwing on.

If you need somewhere else to throw them, you can use my bin!
User avatar
LuckyPierre
 
Posts: 1432
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:37 pm
Location: Canberra, ACT

Postby europa » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:04 pm

peterrjleach wrote:I think that you're both right - in different ways.
Bernard - the Ultegra (and other models) shifters have what Shimano calls a 'trimming' feature


Sorry Peter, but my Ultegra shifters do not have the trimming feature ... and they don't need it - the only place you get rubbing is on small to small or large to large, which you shouldn't be doing anyway. :D

Of course, my units are the current model and things might have changed from earlier :?

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby LuckyPierre » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:18 pm

That's what my mate Bill has drummed in to me, too!
Shimano still think that it's there. I thought it might just be double chain ring thing, but they talk about it for the triple chain model too
Double (ST6600)http://www.shimano.com.au/media/cycling/techdocs/en/bikecomponents/ST/SI-6K20A_v1_m56577569830537931.pdf
Triple (ST6603)http://www.shimano.com.au/media/cycling/techdocs/en/bikecomponents/ST/SI-6K60A_v1_m56577569830537939.pdf
Anyway, who cares - you don't use it if your riding technique is right! :wink:
User avatar
LuckyPierre
 
Posts: 1432
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:37 pm
Location: Canberra, ACT

Postby Bernard » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:48 pm

The Tiagra is a 9 speeder, so no problems with compatibility.

I guess I might as well change them since I already have the Ultegras, there must be something better in them (or does Shimano just make the same levers and stamp them with the different models?).

Anyone want to buy a pair of not even 1 week old Tiagra levers?
Merida CX 4
User avatar
Bernard
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 2:20 pm
Location: Artarmon

Postby heavymetal » Tue Nov 28, 2006 12:27 am

Bernard wrote:I'm using Tiagra levers but I have a pair of practically brand new Ultegra levers that I'm considering throwing on. I think on the Ultegras you can do an adjustment shift on the front derailleur ie after putting it in gear your can move the derailleur slightly so the chain doesn't hit it? is that right?


The Sora has the trim as well but they were useless shifters, so I disconnected them and stuck some friction shifters on. I think most of the shifters have trim adjustment. Now I don't need it anymore.
heavymetal
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 1381
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:32 pm

Postby sogood » Tue Nov 28, 2006 5:34 am

I note that the distance b/n the brake lever and the curvey part of the drop bar can be varied depending on how you set up your front end. Some people's STI pokes up in the air and there's no way you can reach it from the drop unless you have the hand of a king kong. I would suggest that OP should try a few different arrangement and see if the lever can be brought in a bit. I also read somewhere that there are shims that you can get, which is designed to bring the levers in. It might even be a Shimano product.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16898
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby mikesbytes » Tue Nov 28, 2006 8:24 am

There are spacers you can get for shimano leavers that bring them closer to the handlebars.
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14719
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby Mr888 » Tue Nov 28, 2006 5:26 pm

There should be a small screw hidden under the hood that allows you to adjust the levers closer to the drop bars (you have to look closely as its recessed in deep). You might have to readjust the tension of the brake and gear cable if you want to fiddle around with this though. Have fun! 8)
User avatar
Mr888
 
Posts: 409
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 11:06 pm
Location: Glenwood to Sydney CBD

Postby mikesbytes » Tue Nov 28, 2006 6:46 pm

Assuming that the adjustment solutions suggested by Mr888 and myself don't do the deed, you can also get different shaped handlebars, which may be a cheaper solution to new leavers.
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14719
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney


Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot]



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter