Toe Pointing

ironhanglider
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Location: Middle East, Melbourne

Re: Toe Pointing

Postby ironhanglider » Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:01 pm

human909 wrote:
mikesbytes wrote:Personally I wouldn't be too concerned with the toe pointing. The first thing is to fix your ankle or as close as you can get it and you've had advice on how to address that off the bike, After that you can review and refine your cycling.

Another thing to be careful of is that the injury isn't causing adjustments to how you are using your knees, pelvis/hips. To self assess this you can get someone to video you on a stationary bike with different loads, cadences and even standing. If you suspect there is an unwanted adaption happening then get it checked out by an expert. At the end of a day you don't want that ankle to cause issues elsewhere


I agree with this.

Like all sports there is no single one correct technique. On the other hand the orthodox technique is usually like that for a reason. A different technique is fine, but you don't want to be doing yourself damage.


I am a bit perplexed by all this talk about toe pointing as being some kind of fault.

Check out this blokes technique.



I wasn't there, but by all accounts he was a pretty good bike rider...

Besides, it is a much more graceful and elegant style of pedalling. Don't succumb to the peer pressure of the flat-footed pedal crushers.

My problem is that my foot angle varies with cadence. At high cadences I have a distinctly toe down style. At low cadences I have more of a flat-footed style. When I am in good form I am riding with a high cadence in low gears, but when I am suffering in the hills or into a headwind my cadence drops and I am flat-footed. The big question is with my size 46 feet, where do I set my saddle hight; for where I want my form to be, or where it is actually at? The difference is about 15mm so it is significant.

Cheers,

Cameron
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eeksll
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Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 10:36 pm

Re: Toe Pointing

Postby eeksll » Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:17 pm

ironhanglider wrote:My problem is that my foot angle varies with cadence. At high cadences I have a distinctly toe down style. At low cadences I have more of a flat-footed style. When I am in good form I am riding with a high cadence in low gears, but when I am suffering in the hills or into a headwind my cadence drops and I am flat-footed. The big question is with my size 46 feet, where do I set my saddle hight; for where I want my form to be, or where it is actually at? The difference is about 15mm so it is significant.


the simple answer is to train yourself to always ride flat footed :twisted:

or you could get a dropper seatpost.

you cannot be sirrus
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Re: Toe Pointing

Postby you cannot be sirrus » Tue Oct 03, 2017 9:31 am

I was born with deformed feet and had multiple corrective surgeries up to the age of 7. I'm just glad I can pedal at all tbh, I just let my feet do what feels right for me, it's working so far. My right heel does strike the chainstay a bit but I can live with a bit of paint damage, as long as I can ride I'm happy.
Kuota Kharma, Fuji Altamira, mongrel of an Orbea TT bike and an MTB thingy.

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silentC
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Location: Far South Coast NSW

Re: Toe Pointing

Postby silentC » Tue Oct 03, 2017 10:51 am

I'd say I'm not as pronounced as Anquetil but close.

I found a blog post by Steve Hogg about it: https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bi ... t-is-best/

Basically "accept what comes naturally to you and refine it by doing it lots".

Next time someone comments I'll just remind them that Anquetil won the TdF 5 times :)
"If your next bike does not have disc brakes, the bike after that certainly will"
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