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Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 7:47 am
by Bentnose
Just a warning to all. I was riding along the Western Ring Road bike path, just after Plenty Road, heading towards Greensborough when I noticed what looked like a stick lying across the path, then it started moving. I got a very good look at it and a check on the web makes me believe it was an eastern brown snake, apparently the second most venomous snake in the world and it causes more deaths than any other snake, death occurs within minutes, even with the juveniles, the one I saw was fully grown.

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:55 pm
by drcolossus1
Come on! :o

Ignorance is bliss! I didn't need to read this dammit :lol:

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Sat Oct 27, 2012 8:05 am
by Bentnose
You'll just have enough time to ring the loved ones and say goodbye, does that help? No :mrgreen:

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:59 pm
by warthog1
Try to relax and minimise movement. :P :lol:Apply this as best you can and call the ambulance. Chances are you'll survive.

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 10:38 am
by igstar
Spare tube is a handy thing to use for applying presure over the wound.

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:41 pm
by Bentnose
igstar wrote:Spare tube is a handy thing to use for applying presure over the wound.


How are you meant to put it on, I heard the torquinette method is no longer used.

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:10 pm
by Parker
We should start a thread and call it, "how many snake bites did you get this summer?"

See who wins?

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 11:04 pm
by warthog1
Bentnose wrote:
How are you meant to put it on, I heard the torquinette method is no longer used.


It is not for Australian snake envenomation. Pressure immobilisation bandage and minimise limb movement.

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Wed Oct 31, 2012 9:59 am
by zakka101
oh thanks for the heads up, i ride that path alot and am yet to see a snake.
im hating how they are upgrading the dalton road onramp, the detour is so annoying!

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Wed Oct 31, 2012 8:43 pm
by Uncle Just
We should start a thread and call it, "how many snake bites did you get this summer?"

See who wins?


WarrenH on the touring forum was bitten by a eastern brown last week. :shock:

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:00 am
by Bentnose
warthog1 wrote:
Bentnose wrote:
How are you meant to put it on, I heard the torquinette method is no longer used.


It is not for Australian snake envenomation. Pressure immobilisation bandage and minimise limb movement.


Could you just tie the inner tube tightly around the wound, would it help a little? A little is better than death.

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 2:20 pm
by warthog1
The aim of first aid treatment for Australian snake bite is to limit the flow of lymph fluid, not blood.

First Aid for Snake Bites:

Do NOT wash the area of the bite!

It is extremely important to retain traces of venom for use with venom identification kits!

Stop lymphatic spread - bandage firmly, splint and immobilise!

The "pressure-immobilisation" technique is currently recommended by the Australian Resuscitation Council, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.

The lymphatic system is responsible for systemic spread of most venoms. This can be reduced by the application of a firm bandage (as firm as you would put on a sprained ankle) over a folded pad placed over the bitten area. While firm, it should not be so tight that it stops blood flow to the limb or to congests the veins. Start bandaging directly over the bitten area, ensuing that the pressure over the bite is firm and even. If you have enough bandage you can extend towards more central parts of the body, to delay spread of any venom that has already started to move centrally. A pressure dressing should be applied even if the bite is on the victims trunk or torso.

Immobility is best attained by application of a splint or sling, using a bandage or whatever to hand to absolutely minimise all limb movement, reassurance and immobilisation (eg, putting the patient on a stretcher). Where possible, bring transportation to the patient (rather then vice versa). Don't allow the victim to walk or move a limb. Walking should be prevented.

The pressure-immobilisation approach is simple, safe and will not cause iatrogenic tissue damage (ie, from incision, injection, freezing or arterial torniquets - all of which are ineffective).

See the AVRU site for more details of bandaging techniques.

Bites to the head, neck, and back are a special problem - firm pressure should be applied locally if possible.

Removal of the bandage will be associated with rapid systemic spread. Hence ALWAYS wait until the patient is in a fully-equipped medical treatment area before bandage removal is attempted.
Do NOT cut or excise the area or apply an arterial torniquet! Both these measures are ineffective and may make the situation worse.


from http://www.anaesthesia.med.usyd.edu.au/resources/venom/snakebite.html

Re: Brown snake on the Western Ring Road bike path

Posted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 9:59 pm
by Semar
Snakes make you pedal faster! Great natural adrenalin rush. The closer, the better the rush. 8)

Remember, people hardly ever die from snake bite in Australia.