Perth Waterfront

Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby rolandp » Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:26 am

To add to Colin's post, this is what is occurring:
Image

Image

Image

I don't know if it is a new standard for shared paths, as certainly a lot of the PSP do not have it, but looks like a good thing.

My concern is that is technically reducing the width of the path, as they are cutting it smaller to lay the concrete edging.

Wish that they going to this much effort, they would install over head lighting at the same time.
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by BNA » Fri Jun 13, 2014 10:46 am

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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby jonhanson » Fri Jun 13, 2014 10:46 am

Thanks guys for the explanation. Yeah it is a concern that the rideable part of the path is getting thinner as it isn't a very wide path at the best of times.
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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby ColinOldnCranky » Fri Jun 13, 2014 4:56 pm

jonhanson wrote:Thanks guys for the explanation. Yeah it is a concern that the rideable part of the path is getting thinner as it isn't a very wide path at the best of times.

Yep- And that cooch that Roland shows started popping up within six months. I don't expect the curbing to keep it out (the curbing would need to go deeper than 300mm to do so) but it may make the underside a little drier and less comfortable for it.

The history of that stretch shows a variety of good intentions, bad decistions and good decisions over the years.

Building frmm my vague observations, dicussions with workers and contractors and the odd phone call, it is something like this
  • There used to be a path all the way along the river wall to Plain Street, East Perth. (1980s)
  • Most of the river wll path was torn up and the meandering path we have been discussing was constructed in it's place. However they left most of the river-wall road base and simply top dressed it and let the grass grow. So over the years the grass did not grow well at all due to poor drainage during storms (I'm guessing). So the grass grew very badly and lots of loos rubble came to the surface/erosion etc, and they ceased any meaningful maintenance on the actual wall.
  • They reintroduced the river wall path, doing some much need repairs to the river wall in the process. They laid a good base and were, I guess, running on schedule. But the Swan River Trust then delayed by many months the laying of hotmix over the road base. They were concerned about runoff hot-mix when it is melted during construction (in that state it's basically oil).
  • With the delays which were affecting events including the Air Race they had to dump heaps of sand to protect the base and to protect themselves from public liability. More complications
  • They cleared the sand away, got the river wall path done but retained the meandering path as dual use. I was initially told that it was intended to be bike-only. IMO they were right not to encourage fast traffic along it with a dedicated bike path. Tourist/pedestrian hazards
  • They did a pretty solid effort to relay the winding path. Beeeeeeautiful!
  • Cooch started doing it's thing very quickly and encroaching in short time anywhere up to 150mm. (See Rolands pics above.) The cooch is even lifting the surface in places like tree roots do.
  • Now adding curbing.

Somewhere in among all this Perth City Council developed a fantastic reticulation and recycling system to stop feeding algal blooms in the river with nitrogen rich runoff. That involved a lot of ripping up of lawn and bitument etc. (The wetlands at Fraser Point were constructed to take the returning water, letting nature do it's cleaning thing before returning those those reclaimed nutrients into the reticulation to keep Langley Park well grassed.) Using the lessons from the PCC, every golf course in WA should now be compelled to do the same.

Overall I think they have, by accident or design, arrived at a pretty good place.

It is a thin track as you say. But I doubt they have any intent to make it wider/straighter/faster for cyclists. Even though peds have their own path the environs really are the sort of park space that people amble across in a daze. I am sometimes concerned when we get good morning easterlies. There seems to be an over-representation of e-bikers coming in from the east and they really do motor along there when the summer easterlies are in their back. Which is the time when strangers to the city are about watching for birds, taking happy snaps of dolphins and generally waking up. More than a few non-e-bike cyclists could also rethink their need to shave off a little time along there.

It's not a good look when a city returns visitors home on a gurney or in a body bag. :cry:
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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby jonhanson » Sat Jun 14, 2014 3:40 pm

Thanks for the history Colin. V interesting. It's neat though how we have a separated walk and (semi) cycle path on both north and south of the river in Perth - south is better delineated but north still works well separating cyclists and peds most of the time. I was riding today on the bike path south of the river ( was it melville? ) can't remember exactly where and noticed they'd done the same thing with the concrete edging there too.
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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby ColinOldnCranky » Sat Jun 14, 2014 8:13 pm

jonhanson wrote:Thanks for the history Colin. V interesting. It's neat though how we have a separated walk and (semi) cycle path on both north and south of the river in Perth - south is better delineated but north still works well separating cyclists and peds most of the time. I was riding today on the bike path south of the river ( was it melville? ) can't remember exactly where and noticed they'd done the same thing with the concrete edging there too.


I'm guessing around Alfred Cove and amybe the eastern end of Attadale. These are places where the earth can hold water for a long time, expecially the wetlands areas.

The sealed shoulders of our major roads and freeways are another way. THese are mostly put in place in order to protect the main portion of the road from degradation of the road base. The damage is then largely limited to road that does not carry the volumes and loads and so does not break up like the traffic lanes would if more exposed to water underneath. That they can be used as emergency stopping lanes is a bonus. They are also OK for bikes which do not apply significant loads.
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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby wellington_street » Sun Jun 15, 2014 4:04 pm

Cycle lanterns have finally gone up at Barrack St/The Esplanade intersection. Only 3? 4? months late.
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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby Talks_to_Swans » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:50 am

I noticed the cycle lanterns this morning. It was very welcome and gave me a big smile for the rest of the ride in.
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Re: Perth Waterfront

Postby rolandp » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:19 pm

The West has an update video on this project.
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