building a shopping bike

building a shopping bike

Postby toofat » Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:15 pm

Advice needed please
most of the shopping i do (groceries, hardwareetc is within a 3.5 km radius but parking and congestion is getting worse so
I want to build up or buy a shopper
Cargo bikes are quite pricey and might be overkill, and i still have the ute for oversize/ weight items
I buy fresh food almost daily and add in other stuff as needed so its usually what I can carry in two recycle bags or a small trolley
so im thinking rack and panniers but ive never used them so need advice
is two large ones on the back ok, or am i better off with front and back
I want this rig to last and was looking at some of the ortlieb ones with the quick release and shoulder straps that you can take into the shops and load as you buy.

Also what bike would you use, it would be usefull to have something multi purpose that could be used for the odd commute or light tour
also been considering alfine gearing and disc brake options
I have never carried anything more than a messenger bag so no idea what works,
is a kick stand needed, I can see the use at farmers, growers market where there are no walls post to lean the bike on.
Image
toofat
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2008 9:38 am
Location: East Victoria Park,Perth

by BNA » Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:49 pm

BNA
 

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby def » Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:49 pm

Hi TooFat,

I have a bike set up that does all those things.

It's an alu frame MTB hard tail with suspension forks (not really needed). I have got road tyres on both wheels so it's not for off-road.

I have a rack on the back that takes two large panniers (I have some old Karrimor Iberians if anyone remembers them). Each pannier will easily accommodate one shopping bag. The rack is also designed to take a child seat (although not at the same time) which I used when the kids were small. Now they ride their own bikes.

I also use the bike for commuting with just one pannier holding my bag - I don't like riding with a backpack or shoulder bag.

Another significant mod I did was swap out the large range (11-32) rear cassette for a closer range (12-21) which has more useful gears for the generally flat riding I do.

I don't have a rack on the front - I think they're hard to get that fit suspension forks. Might get a handlebar bag one day but adding too much stuff to the basic bike makes it more of a target for thieves.

I'd post a picture but I'm not sure how to!
def
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 3:31 pm

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby jaseyjase » Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:52 pm

for the budget conscious

Image
Image
Image
Image

this might even handle ok
Image

if you have time, money, skills and access to a metal shop - a great read to

http://fixedgeargallery.com/contest/grocerygetter/DavidMahan.htm

Image
Image
Image
Image
User avatar
jaseyjase
 
Posts: 1943
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 2:00 pm
Location: Perth

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby find_bruce » Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:08 pm

And for something between the two extremes see http://tomscargobikes.com/
Image
User avatar
find_bruce
 
Posts: 3166
Joined: Mon May 09, 2011 8:42 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby Joeblake » Fri Sep 07, 2012 6:09 pm

I just added extra carrying capacity to one of my existing MTBs.

Just a few U-bolts with wing nuts and washers, you can remove/replace it in a couple of minutes by hand.

Image

So it wouldn't overhang the back of the carry rack and possibly upset the balance, I bought a box which had the cutout at the front, and even with my big butt, it fits neatly in there.

Image

I've also got the BoB trailer which has optional extra sets of axle nuts. I can tote it behind several different machines.

Image

Image

Image


Joe
To acquire immunity to eloquence is of the utmost importance to the citizens of a democracy
Bertrand Russell
Many people feel their lifestyle has a high price, but they're quite cool with that .. as long as somebody ELSE pays the price.
Joeblake
 
Posts: 12533
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2008 9:04 pm
Location: Lesmurdie WA

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby Lizzy » Fri Sep 07, 2012 8:33 pm

Ha I totally want that red rig with the grey tub in the middle! :mrgreen:

I pretty regularly do grocery shopping on my hybrid, with a rack & dutch style market panniers (there's a pic in 'claim your bragging rights'). They stay on the bike, I lock them in with a little luggage cable lock, but I take a couple of those boxy flat-bottomed supermarket bags, fill them up and then just slot them straight into the panniers. You'd be surprised how much you can get in there, and IME that set up works fine if you shop small & often.

Kickstand would probably help a bit if there is seriously no fixture to prop against, although mine doesn't cope with a heavy load for long so I always load the opposite side first. Other tips are to keep an ocky strap or similar on hand for things like the 6 pack of dunny rolls, then you can strap these across the top of the rack/panniers (to the amusement of the public at large) & free up more bag space. I've also been meaning to get a little pack-away rucksack to keep handy just in case of accidentally biting off more than your panniers can chew.
“Lexa”: 2012 Trek Lexa S; “Bluey”: 2006 Trek 7.0FX
User avatar
Lizzy
 
Posts: 515
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2011 2:04 pm
Location: Wild West

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby mitzikatzi » Fri Sep 07, 2012 8:48 pm

Kona Minute

Kona Ute

There once was an Australian seller of copy Dutch Cargo bikes “Bakfiets”

Or Xtracycle conversion of an old mountain bike

If you route is flat a trailer eg "bob trailer or and old kids trailer
Xplora wrote: Do not get cheap SPDs, your body will hurt you.

trailgumby wrote:29ers are awesome.
User avatar
mitzikatzi
 
Posts: 1638
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:21 am
Location: Perth

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby toofat » Sat Sep 08, 2012 1:57 pm

thanks for all the imput
the super market trolley conversion is novel but id end up being chased by the trolley collection guys, some amazing options out there
Image
toofat
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2008 9:38 am
Location: East Victoria Park,Perth

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby John Lewis » Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:24 pm

Guess you don't want to builld but have a look on AtomicZombie. They have some interesting plans. In the gallery there are quite a few home made cargo bikes.

For me I'm like Joe and just hitch up a trailer although mine are all two wheeled.

John
John Lewis
 
Posts: 1143
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:12 pm
Location: Albany. 400km South of Perth

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby Thoglette » Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:08 pm

toofat wrote:I buy fresh food almost daily and add in other stuff as needed so its usually what I can carry in two recycle bags or a small trolley
so im thinking rack and panniers but ive never used them so need advice
is two large ones on the back ok, or am i better off with front and back
<snip>
is a kick stand needed, I can see the use at farmers, growers market where there are no walls post to lean the bike on.


a) panniers at the back are great for bulk items. There are some middle of the range options (I've got second hand Deuter which are fine, if not as rain proof as some). You will be suprised at how much will disappear into 80L of space.

b) Very Strong rack at the front for cartons, casks, pumpkins and the like. I've a wire basket but it's too weak for a whole carton.
I'm not sold on racks/baskets at the back - It is very difficult to mount a bike with a loaded rack on the back

c) Once you get any weight on the bike at all a side stand (or centre stand) is absolutely essential during loading.
Even then beware - especially on grass/sand. In a pinch, load up stand side panniers first and heavier than other side; straddle bike and load rack/basket at front using knees to steady bike.

On bikes - an old steel or aluminum suspension-free frame in 26" or 27" wheel sizes is the go - tyres under 32mm need not apply.
Some of the current crop of flat bar "City bikes" meet this spec with 700C/32 or bigger tyres.

Gears are not that important as long as you have slow; uphill; and uphill with a heavy load into a headwind.

You need eyelets front and rear. Flat or (better) slight riser bars (eg north road style) help with the control.
User avatar
Thoglette
 
Posts: 963
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:01 pm

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby Thoglette » Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:22 pm

Oh, I always wanted an Xtracycle FreeRadical- but I ended up getting a tandem instead*.

The catch with any of the long or wide bikes is that they really are Looong and Wiiidde. Very hard to get around anti-MX bollards and between cars

A Bob trailer has most of the carrying capacity without the permanent hassel

*Less storage, more passenger space.
User avatar
Thoglette
 
Posts: 963
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:01 pm

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby Joeblake » Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:34 pm

Was at the "Travel to the Future" show in Mundaring yesterday. Lots of electric cars, plus a few electric bicycles (and one electric tricycle - guess who? :wink: )

plus this:

Image
Image
Image

The guy says he built it from a female MTB frame and added an extra diagonal downtube(s) (to the rear hub) and then extended from the bottom bracket.

Problem is he's put 1000 watts of electric power in the rear hub.

If you want to contact him apparently he's on "Endless Sphere", screen name 1000W but I couldn't find him.

Joe
Last edited by Joeblake on Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
To acquire immunity to eloquence is of the utmost importance to the citizens of a democracy
Bertrand Russell
Many people feel their lifestyle has a high price, but they're quite cool with that .. as long as somebody ELSE pays the price.
Joeblake
 
Posts: 12533
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2008 9:04 pm
Location: Lesmurdie WA

Re: building a shopping bike

Postby rcmkII » Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:35 pm

I have a hybrid with a rear rack and a pair of Tioga panniers. I take one of those blue zip-up Coles/Woolies bags, folded up, and if I end up with too much stuff for the panniers I just fill the blue bag and strap it on top of the rack, between the panniers. I also have a cheapo set of aero-bars on this bike, and can hang a second blue bag off those if necessary. (Light/fragile stuff - bread, eggs, etc.) That's plenty of space for the average shopping trip, and the most important thing to remember is that it's so quick and easy to take the bike shopping that it doesn't matter if you go three or four times a week. Sometimes I pick a more distant shopping centre just for the exercise and a bit of variety.

I've been doing this for a couple of years now, and it's made food shopping a breeze. We're a family of four (two adults, two teens) so we get through a fair bit of stuff.

The only problem? My wife caught the craze early this year, and now she's usually done the shopping on her bike before I get a chance to go.
Riding and writing my way to health and happiness.
rcmkII
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 11:55 am
Location: Perth, WA


Return to Western Australia

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: dampier, kenji44



Support BNA
Click for online shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Cycling Express Cycling Express
Ebay Ebay AU
ProBikeKit ProBikeKit UK
Evans Cycles Evans Cycles UK
JensonUSA Jenson USA
JensonUSA Competitive Cyclist