Touring equipment, cycling and noncycling gear. Suggestions?

All about touring, whether you are a local or visiting from overseas.

Postby il padrone » Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:00 pm

Caelum wrote:absolutely - specially when traveling in the cooler climates of aus, or in the wet. Though i'd likely rather jump inside my tent in a sleeping bag if i'm cold in the wet :)

A couple of tips for cold, wet camps. We had one such in the Jameson River valley one Christmas.

1. Light groundsheet/tarp slung between some trees for rain shelter.

2. Fire built just on the down wind side. Wet wood? Yep, but no worries. Take a sardine tin (empty) and fill it with meths (not shellite!). Light it and build kindling and small sticks around it teepee-style. Gradually add bigger and bigger branches to the teepee all the time. The meths will keep burning like a Trangia burner and eventually dry out all the wood.

We ended up with a lovely fire in the rain, and stood by it under the tarp to dry our clothes - while-you-wear style :D 8)

This site was a similar camp, in winter in the lovely Hughes Creek valley near Seymour

Image


Caelum wrote:Looks like a proper camping site that one - not sure how many of those i'll come across on my trip... in the more populated areas(ie, not in the middle of the desert) probably fairly often, and in those cases, yep, fire would be welcome if there's no ban.

Yes, a National Parks camp in the Brisbane Ranges near Anakie, Vic. It's a basic site for the walking track through the park (we had permission to use it). There are plenty of these basic bush campsites with fireplaces, toilets and water, in State Forests and public lands in Victoria Tassie and NSW, not sure about Qld. Try to get a copy of Camping in Victoria and similar Boiling Billy Guides to other states

To tell you the truth those iron fireplaces are more of a nuisance than anything. In more remote areas or true bush camps you just need to clear a suitable fire place and collect firewood for fuel. The desert regions will have some areas where you can gather wood for a cooking fire.
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by BNA » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:59 pm

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Postby geoffs » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:59 pm

Got to admit that I'm a wimp. We've been really lucky with the weather when we've been touring. The one time that it did just pour for the whole day we stayed at this place [img]http://s26.photobucket.com/albums/c111/Decerebrated/?action=view&current=GoldenerSternGasthof.jpg[img]

After 120kms of rain we thought we deserved it.
Many years ago on a GEAR ride that was based at Bowral we were car camping so I had a huge tarp with me just in case. It did rain so as I had about the largest shelter there, lots of people bearing bottles of wine decided to join me.

As for cooking over open fires. It's a great idea so long as someone else's pots are used. I hate trying to clean carbon of my nice clean pots. I'm sure there's a trick to it but I only tried this once.
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Postby il padrone » Tue Dec 09, 2008 9:33 pm

geoffs wrote:Got to admit that I'm a wimp. We've been really lucky with the weather when we've been touring. The one time that it did just pour for the whole day we stayed at this place [img]http://s26.photobucket.com/albums/c111/Decerebrated/?action=view&current=GoldenerSternGasthof.jpg[img]

Mmm... nice tandem. Did you use a different one in Tuscany?

geoffs wrote:Many years ago on a GEAR ride that was based at Bowral we were car camping....

I went on that ride one year, 1997 I recall.

geoffs wrote:I hate trying to clean carbon of my nice clean pots. I'm sure there's a trick to it but I only tried this once.

Don't bother cleaning till you get home, or to a YHA/backpackers. Then use a good scourer (plastic on the coating of the GSI pots) and lots of soapy hot water.
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Postby Aushiker » Fri Dec 12, 2008 7:09 pm

G'day

In terms of a camping stove, you might want to check out Roger's pages on fuel efficiency here. Also some good advice on various aspects of camping can be found in the FAQas well.

Oh I use a MSR Superfly (had it for a fair while now) and will continue to use it.

Andrew
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Postby Aushiker » Fri Dec 12, 2008 7:15 pm

G'day

Here is some weather camping :) It felt like we had had three months of dry season rain fall in one day (Larapinta Trail, NT). We had to use a fuel stove to try and get a fire going :wink:

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Postby Caelum » Fri Dec 12, 2008 7:34 pm

My liquid/gas hybrid stove arrived today - a primus multifuel.

Just tested it out on butane/propane gas just then, was rather impressive, though the simmer ability is better on the kovea titanium stove i previously purchased.

The obvious advantage of this stove is that it'll run on shellite, kero, even unleaded or diesel if need be.

Build quality is absolutely fantastic.

Pic of the multifuel stove:

Image

Pic of the Kovea Titanium:

Image
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Postby Aushiker » Fri Dec 12, 2008 7:39 pm

Caelum wrote:Just tested it out on butane/propane gas just then, was rather impressive, though the simmer ability is better on the kovea titanium stove i previously purchased.

What you planning to do with the Kovea? :)

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Postby Caelum » Fri Dec 12, 2008 7:59 pm

Aushiker wrote:
Caelum wrote:Just tested it out on butane/propane gas just then, was rather impressive, though the simmer ability is better on the kovea titanium stove i previously purchased.

What you planning to do with the Kovea? :)

Andrew



Vulture :P


I'll be keeping them both - the kovea weighs next to nothing, so will be using the both of them on my trip.

To be sure to be sure.
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Postby il padrone » Fri Dec 12, 2008 8:24 pm

Caelum wrote:the kovea weighs next to nothing,

Yes, the Kovea Titanium is the veritable 'matchbox' stove 8)
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Postby Caelum » Fri Dec 12, 2008 8:29 pm

For Andrews benefit - i purchased the kovea for $72.50 at Wellington Surplus, in the Perth CBD.

Can likely be purchased cheaper online, but will obviously need to take shipping into account.
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Postby Aushiker » Fri Dec 12, 2008 8:32 pm

Caelum wrote:For Andrews benefit - i purchased the kovea for $72.50 at Wellington Surplus, in the Perth CBD.

Can likely be purchased cheaper online, but will obviously need to take shipping into account.


Thanks but I am not that serious about one ... was just asking .... you just never know :)

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Postby geoffs » Mon Dec 15, 2008 8:57 am

So how much did you pay for your stove Caelum?
It's been really well reviewed on the net. It still sounds like it's just as noisy as my Dragonfly though which is the only downside of mine.

We had a new Co-Motion Mocha Co-pilot tandem custom made for us in 2005 which we picked up on our way to France and Austria.
The Tandem that I had in Tuscany was a horrible thing that the LBS in London had built for us at a cheap price as I thought a Dawes was a bit expensive. Big Mistake!
Front wheel was badly built and had a drum brake. It was the reason that I learned all about building wheels as the spokes were breaking every few days as we were riding through France. Frame was way to small for me so I was really cramped and ended up was a big sebaceous cyst in a bad place. We rode across France and through Italy which was a bit hilly. Managed to destroy the pawls on 2 shimano freewheels. The Campag free-wheel (Shimano in Italy 1990?) that we had a bike shop put on in Sarzana wouldn't index with the bar end shifters. What a fun trip! When we got back to London my stoker had put on a few kilos and I had no body fat left.
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Postby Caelum » Mon Dec 15, 2008 11:21 am

I paid $150 AUD inc postage, for the Primus Multifuel.


Only played around with it on gas so far, but cooked up some pancakes with it over the weekend, worked alright.


You're right about the noise, but i guess it is only for 15 minutes a day... the Kovea Titanium i have is much quieter.
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Postby utopia » Wed Dec 17, 2008 7:12 am

If you need to recharge your phone ipod, digital camera, gps etc on tour then you might need one of these rechargers
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Postby il padrone » Wed Dec 17, 2008 5:30 pm

Sort of neat idea :?

But I think I'd rather just plug it in at the camp kitchen in a caravan park... or at the YHA I stay at. When on truly remote tours where such facilities are not available (bush camping) chances are you don't have mobile reception anyway. As for the other gadgets, I live without them mostly. My digital camera has a long-life battery, or I use the one which uses AA batteries.
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Postby hartleymartin » Thu Feb 19, 2009 10:59 pm

For where you are heading I would strongly recommend a personal locator beacon and get it registered. Have it on your person so that in case of the worst-case scenario - you fall over and break your leg, you can simply turn it on, take your painkillers and wait for help to arrive.
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Postby Caelum » Fri Feb 20, 2009 8:27 am

hartleymartin wrote:For where you are heading I would strongly recommend a personal locator beacon and get it registered. Have it on your person so that in case of the worst-case scenario - you fall over and break your leg, you can simply turn it on, take your painkillers and wait for help to arrive.


Aleady got one on order, shouldn't be long before it arrives :)


Really getting closer to me leaving soon too... just need a trailer and i'm pretty much set now. Might be able to track one of those down in the next week or so, which would be good.


Had a fairly nice tax return come my way(for the last 3 years tax!), so i'm not going to be working for as long as i thought i should... got money to burn now :)
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