tyres

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tyres

Postby felix » Sat Sep 26, 2009 11:43 pm

I'd like some advice on selecting a tyre for a 1000 km plus ride...roads will vary from smooth to possible semi-gravel
I'm not the most gifted in bike maintenance and would hence like to change as few tubes as possible
willing to spend and willing to sacrifice speed for durability.
Thanks for all the wisdom
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by BNA » Sun Sep 27, 2009 2:30 am

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Re: tyres

Postby Wingnut » Sun Sep 27, 2009 2:30 am

I've heard many a good word about the Conti Contact tyre I think it's called, plan to try some myself in the near future.
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Re: tyres

Postby mylesau » Sun Sep 27, 2009 11:34 am

I do that type of riding, and worse, on a set of Vittoria Randonneur, and am now over 3,000 km without a puncture. They appear to be holding up well - not half way through the tread yet. (700x37c) Good value for money in my opinion.

The fairly widely accepted 'toughest' touring tyres are supposed to be Schwalbe Marathon XR's, though they are heavy and expensive - I haven't tried them yet - but will be soon on a 26" bike. Also the relatively new Marathon Supreme are getting good reviews, again expensive, but a bit lighter than the XR's. These may be overkill for what you want?
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Re: tyres

Postby m@ » Mon Sep 28, 2009 4:08 pm

If you're not fussed about rolling resistance, some tyre liners might be the go.
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Re: tyres

Postby backroads » Mon Sep 28, 2009 7:51 pm

I have Continental Travel Contacts on my bike and cant praise them highly enoungh. On my recent tour I didn' have any punctures - nearly did from a 3 cornered Jack (cateye) but caught it in time. I was surprised I didn't have lots of punctures from the jacks and burrs when making my way into the bush to camp and from the very rough gravel roads.

They are also fast too. My brother lined his $8000.00 carbon fibre Trek with racing slicks and bladed spokes against my hybrid tourer with front and rear racks (no panniers). Much to his disgust there wasn't any difference at all. The only thing we can put it down to is that he is only slightly taller than me so might have had a little more wind resisatnce.

Anyway, at $75.00 each they are a good tyre and I wouldn't hesitate to buy them again but can't see the need happening any time soon. After 1000km the front still has the moulding rib in the centre of the tread and the rear isn't much different.
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Re: tyres

Postby RonK » Wed Sep 30, 2009 11:12 pm

Don't confuse the Conti Contacts with Travel Contacts. There are actually 5 different models in the Contact range ( Sport, City, Top, Contact, Travel).

Look at them here: http://www.conti-tyres.co.uk/conticycle/citytouring.shtml

The Travel Contacts are more ruggedly constructed - Contacts are city tyres. They were OEM on my Surly LHT and they were rubbish. I got two punctures on my first 60 km ride, both from stone chips lodged in the tread. Not what I expect for touring.

I replaced them immediately with folding Schwalbe Marathon Supremes. These are not too heavy (compared to XR's) and roll beautifully. If you are riding much on unsealed roads, the XR's are probably the best choice. But they are expensive - you can probably buy a tyre for your car cheaper.
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Re: tyres

Postby il padrone » Wed Sep 30, 2009 11:41 pm

mylesau wrote:I do that type of riding, and worse, on a set of Vittoria Randonneur, and am now over 3,000 km without a puncture. They appear to be holding up well - not half way through the tread yet. (700x37c) Good value for money in my opinion.

I am currently still using the Vittoria Randonneur Cross tyres in a 26X1.75 version and they are the best tyres I've used in over 30 years of touring. Currently they have covered 10,000kms of touring and commuting - with zero punctures. The tread still has quite a bit of life in it yet. The 'Double Defence' puncture resistant layer has withstood several cat-head thorns into the casing with no worries.

I'd rate these as better than the Schwalbe Marathon, don't know about the Marathon XR as I haven't used it or seen one in sustained use.
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Re: tyres

Postby redned » Fri Oct 02, 2009 4:22 pm

Felix. You didn't say what type of bike. I have used a range of tyres on the MTB I use for touring. Currently Maxiis Wormdrives which is a hybrid for 1200km four week Spain tour with a lot of minor road, dirt road and some off-road. I recommend thorn resistant tubes, whatever tyre choose. I have never had a flat since changing to them.
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Re: tyres

Postby backroads » Fri Oct 02, 2009 5:05 pm

Felix,

there are obviously a lot of very good tyres out there for you to choose from. No doubt there are many bad ones too.

I am very happy with my Continental travel contacts however my hybrid bike came with Continental Double Fighter 2 tyres. I wouldn't wish them on my worst enemy. I had more flats in the month after I bought the bike than I have had in 15 years of riding with skinny little road tyres.

I haven't had a very good run with Continental tubes either. KMart or Target tubes have given me better service than Continentals.

Can anyone recommend some good tubes?
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Re: tyres

Postby m@ » Fri Oct 02, 2009 5:12 pm

backroads wrote:Felix,

there are obviously a lot of very good tyres out there for you to choose from. No doubt there are many bad ones too.

I am very happy with my Continental travel contacts however my hybrid bike came with Continental Double Fighter 2 tyres. I wouldn't wish them on my worst enemy. I had more flats in the month after I bought the bike than I have had in 15 years of riding with skinny little road tyres.

I haven't had a very good run with Continental tubes either. KMart or Target tubes have given me better service than Continentals.

Can anyone recommend some good tubes?


Well, I would have recommended Continental... ;)

TBH unless the valve is failing or the tube failing along a seam, you can't really blame your tube for a flat. If something sharp gets through the tyre, it will cut through any tube just as easily. Thinner tubes will deflate more quickly for obvious reasons, but that's the tradeoff for lower weight and rolling resistance. Most brands (Conti included) have a range of weights/thicknesses - for commuting or touring I'd avoid the 'race' ones.
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Re: tyres

Postby backroads » Fri Oct 02, 2009 5:29 pm

m@,

I have had a number of continental tubes that have had faulty valves. Either the valve is poorly vulcanised to the tube or the screw part of the valve brakes off when you tighten it after pumping - this is always evident on first inflation.

You could say that it is the way that I pump the tyre and I accept that, however it has only ever happened to me with Continentals and on quite a number of occasions. Never on the el cheapo brands.
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Re: tyres

Postby Chatbox » Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:06 am

I'm currently using Continental Touring Plus Tires.
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Re: tyres

Postby Wingnut » Sat Oct 03, 2009 4:35 pm

Can anyone recommend a really durable tube as well?

How do Slime tubes rate?
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Re: tyres

Postby hartleymartin » Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:37 pm

Steer clear of slime tubes. The slime eventually settles at the bottom of the wheel and causes a horrible weight imbalance. You'd be better off with "thornproof" tubes, which have a thicker section of rubber on the outside. Increased rolling mass, but combined with kevlar-belted tyres you get a combination which is a bit of a performance compromise, but is very puncture resistant.
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Re: tyres

Postby il padrone » Fri Oct 09, 2009 8:16 pm

hartleymartin wrote:Steer clear of slime tubes. The slime eventually settles at the bottom of the wheel and causes a horrible weight imbalance.

That is not how slime (or Stan's No-tubes) works. The sealant remains liquid in the air, only glues up when compressed in tight spaces, like the hole in the tube. While liquid and in motion, centrifugal force keeps it spinning around the tyre.

hartleymartin wrote:You'd be better off with "thornproof" tubes, which have a thicker section of rubber on the outside. Increased rolling mass

Thornproof tubes are horribly heavy. You'd be better off just fitting two tyres per wheel :P

Personally I use tyres that really are thornproof (Vittoria Randonneur) and use ordinary tubes. I shall test this out next weekend when I tour the Murray Valley. Lots of bindiis about at Kerang.
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Re: tyres

Postby hartleymartin » Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:55 am

hartleymartin wrote:Steer clear of slime tubes. The slime eventually settles at the bottom of the wheel and causes a horrible weight imbalance.

il padrone wrote:That is not how slime (or Stan's No-tubes) works. The sealant remains liquid in the air, only glues up when compressed in tight spaces, like the hole in the tube. While liquid and in motion, centrifugal force keeps it spinning around the tyre.

I'm referring to having left your bicycle overnight or for a few days the slime settles at the bottom of the wheel and when you first take it for a ride it creates a massive imbalance in the wheel and mucks up the handling. (like with all things) there are probably better "slime" tubes available which don't do this, but I have not encountered them yet. I tried one slime tube and it turned out to be an expensive waste of time for me.

hartleymartin wrote:You'd be better off with "thornproof" tubes, which have a thicker section of rubber on the outside. Increased rolling mass

il padrone wrote:Thornproof tubes are horribly heavy. You'd be better off just fitting two tyres per wheel :P
Personally I use tyres that really are thornproof (Vittoria Randonneur) and use ordinary tubes. I shall test this out next weekend when I tour the Murray Valley. Lots of bindiis about at Kerang.

The thicker thorn-proof tubes do reduce your acceleration because it increases the rotating mass of the wheel, but once moving I find that it isn't a great impedance to my progress on tours or when commuting either. However, I must qualify my recommendations and say that each must find what works best for their situation. 47-559 tyres with kevlar belting and thorn-proof tubes might be heavy, but they work for me. They are not going to suit everyone's riding style.
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Re: tyres

Postby sogood » Thu Oct 15, 2009 4:13 pm

hartleymartin wrote:... You'd be better off with "thornproof" tubes, which have a thicker section of rubber on the outside. Increased rolling mass, but combined with kevlar-belted tyres you get a combination which is a bit of a performance compromise, but is very puncture resistant.

Just pay for better quality tyres with better puncture resistance and forget about those special tubes.
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