My touring rig - post yours

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rustguard
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby rustguard » Sat Mar 26, 2011 5:32 pm

Very nice, what are the specs of the forks? What is the chainstay length?

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RonK
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Sat Mar 26, 2011 9:55 pm

rustguard wrote:Very nice, what are the specs of the forks? What is the chainstay length?


There is no detailed spec available for the forks. The stays are 44cm - and designed to accommodate the 26" x 2" Schwalbe Big Apple, so bags of clearance.

You can find all the details here.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Baldy
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Baldy » Sun Mar 27, 2011 3:29 pm

Il-Padrone , building that bike must have been near as much fun as riding it. Well thought out bike with bits that I love. Reading about your trips it suits you down to a tee 8)

Riddley, I had never heard of Learsport before. How old is it mate? It obviously works just look at that grin :mrgreen:

Ron.......I'm an Atheist but.......my god, that is nice :lol: . That is right up my alley, nice and flashy 8) Now that is going to be fun to build up! What do you have in mind? spill the beans man!!

cheers
Baldy

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RonK
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Mon Mar 28, 2011 12:26 am

Baldy wrote:Ron.......I'm an Atheist but.......my god, that is nice . That is right up my alley, nice and flashy Now that is going to be fun to build up! What do you have in mind? spill the beans man!!

Well it's even nicer in the hand than in the picture, and weighs only 1.88kg :D.

When I built my first bike last year I discovered how just much I enjoyed the process of researching and selecting the components, hunting down the best prices on the internet, and finally putting it all together and taking it on tour to New Zealand. In fact I enjoyed it so much I just can't resist doing it again, but this time I want to build a bike that can handle the back roads.

So, the SON 28 dynamohub and Rohloff Speedhub and the Andra rims had already arrived, and I've built them into wheels. The frame and fork arrived last week, so that is all the major components procured, and I haven't had to pay any import duties (lucky) :wink: . Since my bank balance has by now taken a severe battering, there will be a short hiatus before the rest of the components can be ordered. With luck it'll all be finished by touring time (October).

Here's the likely specification:
    Frame: Van Nicholas Pioneer 3AL/2.5V Titanium Frame + Bushnell EBB, 55cm
    Fork: Van Nicholas VNT TRX Alloy Expedition / Touring
    Crankset: Truvativ Stylo SS GXP X-Drive Single-speed, 38T, 175mm
    Brakes: Avid Single Digit SL
    Wheels: Rohloff SpeedHub & SON Dynamo Hub, Sapim Race Double-Butted Spokes, Rigida Andra 30 CSS Rims 26" 32H
    Tyres: Schwalble Marathon Dureme 26" x 2.00"
    Headset: FSA Orbit Z, Internal Threadless Sealed Bearing, Silver 1-1/8''
    Headset Spacers: Van Nicholas 3AL/2.5V Titanium, 30mm
    Stem: Van Nicholas 3AL/2.5V Titanium, 100mm
    Handlebar: Van Nicholas 31.8mm OS 3AL/2.5V Titanium
    Grips: Ergon Rohloff GC3 Multi-Postion Ergonomic
    Seatpost: Van Nicholas Titanium 300mm, Laser engraved, Polished Ti, Zero Setback
    Seat Collar: Van Nicholas CNC Machined Titanium
    Saddle: Brooks B17 Titanium, Antique Brown
    Pedals: Shimano 2011 PD-M770 XT SPD Clipless, double entry
    Mudguards: Velo-Orange Stainless Steel 26" x 60mm
    Kickstand: Pletscher ESGE Comp, Silver
    Front Rack: Tubus Nova Stainless Steel
    Rear Rack: Tubus Cosmo Stainless Steel
    Light: Schmidt Edelux, Silver
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Riddley
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Riddley » Wed Mar 30, 2011 8:28 pm

Baldy wrote:
Riddley, I had never heard of Learsport before. How old is it mate? It obviously works just look at that grin :mrgreen:


It's an Australian company but I think they have re-branded to some Italian sounding name. It was not expensive, I think about $500 - $600, can't really remember, from Lygon St Cycles. You do see them around Melbourne occasionally.

My friends on that particular tour were riding custom built German "Rotor" bikes (with Rohloff) which they really love. They are now in Eastern Tibet, and by the look of the mud on their gear, you wouldn't really be wanting to run derailleurs out there! http://pedalum.wordpress.com/

I can't really compare it to other bikes, but yes, it goes fine, handles pretty well, and importantly for touring, it handles very well all loaded up.

The only regret I have re touring gear as pictured is the front rollers. I find them a bit small, wish I had got 4 rear rollers.

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elStado
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby elStado » Sat Apr 23, 2011 10:21 pm

I've been doing a bit of research into a long distance touring bike. This thread is great. It's helpful to see what people are using, how they have it set up and how it fares in real-world usage.

Keep it coming!
Check out my practical cycling and cycle touring website: VELOPHILE AUSTRALIA

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby hartleymartin » Sun Apr 24, 2011 9:29 pm

If I were starting from scratch again, I'd probably consult Europa about a custom touring frame for 26" wheels. At about $600, it's not bad!
Martin Christopher Hartley

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mylesau » Wed May 04, 2011 8:37 pm

Since we don't have a Folding section, and this will be used for light touring...

Image
Season Tikit

Image
Rear View

Image
IGH Goodness - Nexus 8

Image
Brooks Goodness - Flyer

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Side View

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Folded or a pile of parts...

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Folded from Above

I've got the front rack but will only fit it if I need front panniers for extra space. I'm waiting on a Carradice Camper Longflap to go on the back, which should hopefully provide enough space for some light touring. I'm heading off to New Zealand next month and this is coming with me. Will be travelling from place to place by car but hope to explore places using my Season Tikit :)

Only arrived today and took it for a quick ride. All up it's excellent. There is a bit of flex in the stem riser, but that was expected (it's not too bad). It rides/feels like a full sized bike, which is why I went with a Bike Friday. The Nexus 8 is slick. I ride a Rohloff everyday, and the Nexus actually feels a bit 'lighter/more precise' on the changes. The Nexus changes are opposite to the Rohloff - will take a while for my brain to make the switch automatically...why isn't there a standard???

Chris King sealed headset and sealed front hub, along with the Nexus, should give a very low maintenance bike.

Both the Nexus 8 and the Chris King headset are very 'tight', I can only assume that they will loosen up with a few miles.

Now that I've got it I need to sort out a carry bag. I'm thinking of getting one custom made, not sure yet.

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hartleymartin
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby hartleymartin » Wed May 04, 2011 10:01 pm

mylesau wrote:I've got the front rack but will only fit it if I need front panniers for extra space. I'm waiting on a Carradice Camper Longflap to go on the back, which should hopefully provide enough space for some light touring. I'm heading off to New Zealand next month and this is coming with me. Will be travelling from place to place by car but hope to explore places using my Season Tikit :)


If you play your cards well, you can fit a sleeping mat, compressed sleeping bag, spare jersey and nicks and a few other items into the Camper long-flap. I would recommend replacing the leather straps that hold it onto the brooks saddle with some nylon webbing toe-clips. Strap you rain gear to the exterior loops, and you should be pretty sweet. Pack a spare tube, patch kit and tyre levers into one side pocket, and some trail bars in the other side pocket and you should be pretty sweet. I've also carried my tentpoles and camera tripod under the longflap

mylesau wrote:The Nexus changes are opposite to the Rohloff - will take a while for my brain to make the switch automatically...why isn't there a standard???


The great thing about standards is that there are so many to chose from!
Martin Christopher Hartley

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mylesau
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mylesau » Thu May 05, 2011 11:51 am

Sounds like good advice for the Camper Longflap straps. Thanks Martin.

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby avalon » Sun May 15, 2011 11:54 pm

HELP PLEASE. How do I post a Photo?

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il padrone
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Mon May 16, 2011 12:20 am

avalon wrote:HELP PLEASE. How do I post a Photo?

FAQ - How to post a photo
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mlavis » Thu Jun 09, 2011 9:00 pm

Greetings all! Firstly, I'd like to say i've had a great time trawling this thread (and many others) for inspiration on my touring bike build. It is a work in progress and I would really love some advice on a few things that i'm working on at the moment. I am preparing for a 2 year expedition style tour of SE and Central Asia. I am on a bit of a budget (would prefer to keep spending under control so I can fund the 2 years I'll need to complete the trip!).

My starting point was a Trek 870 fully rigid Cromo Mountain bike. The model is called the Mt. Track. Its a nice sturdy beast with simple mechanics, 21 speed with twist shifters, V brakes etc. Since receiving it i have changed out the flat handle bar to Butterfly one, got a brooks b17 saddle and made my own Heavy duty rear rack and mud guard frames out of 316 stainless steel flat bar. On the front will be a Tubus Tara rack (I would have gone with the Tubs cargo on the rear as well but had to compensate for short chain stays).

I'm looking for some advice on wheels. The stock wheels appear to be single walled alloy rims laced to Shimano STX hubs. I know at least the rims will need to be changed but am unsure about the hubs. If they are of a good quality I would just replace the rims- something along the lines of the Velocity Psycho, sun Rhyno, or Rigida Andra from what i've been reading. I don't mind paying decent money for good quality products- but there is no way i'll be forking out all my savings for the cutting edge Phil wood/ Rohloff/ schlumpf hubs etc. Otherwise i'd end up with a hot bike but not the ability to put it to use! What would you suggest to be a good quality- medium cost solution for my wheel issues? Keep in mind that It would need to fit a 7 speed rear cluster.

Once the wheels are up to scratch the bike will be laden with ortlieb front roller classics, the classic handle bar bag, some crosso waterproof rear panniers and a ortlieb rear rucksack.

Also, does anyone know a good inexpensive wheel building/truing stand? I have a bit of technical knowledge when it comes to things with spoked wheels but would like to be able to build my own wheels before I head off. It would give me a bit of confidence knowing I could replace spokes, true taco's etc when i'm out in the wilderness.

Thanks everyone,

Mark

Image

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mylesau
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mylesau » Thu Jun 09, 2011 9:44 pm

Regarding the truing stand - save your money for the trip and just flip the bike upside down and use the bike itself as a truing stand.

I've built a few wheels using an old frame as a truing stand and they have turned out very well.

A couple of tips:
* use a piece of wire (I use a twist tie) wrapped around the chain stay to see the rim variations - if you set it right you can get it just rubing on the high spots.
* use a bit of white tape between the chain stays to check for centre - mark the rim position and then flip the wheel - adjust until there is no diff. when flipped.
* use quality spokes - I recommend DT Swiss Competition DB

Read Sheldon Browns wheel building guide and take it slow. It's actually pretty easy to do and a good skill to have.

Any of the three rims you mentioned should be a good choice. Note that the CSS Rigidas need special pads, but they are awesome on both stopping power and wear.

[Competition not Champion - edited]
Last edited by mylesau on Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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RonK
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Thu Jun 09, 2011 10:57 pm

mlavis wrote:Also, does anyone know a good inexpensive wheel building/truing stand?


I bought one of these- it's fine for occasional home use.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

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rustguard
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby rustguard » Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:40 am

The trek 800's have decent chainstay length so I wouldn't worry about fitting a rack if you want too; 435mm is my guess. I rode mine a long time never had a problem with normal panniers. the rack you have made has no lateral support for the panniers ( to stop them flexing and rubbing on the tyre ).
As long as you are spending money grab some decent canti-brakes, otherwise grab a half decent set of V-Brakes from the dump, or someone's sister's bike.
What is the front Guard thingy on the front?

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mlavis » Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:05 am

Wow, thanks for all the responses and advice so far. It is greatly appreciated. That wheel building stand looks to the a good bargain so I'll jump on one- Thanks for the link RonK!

(AT) Rustguard. The rear rack is actually surprisingly rigid thanks to the twists in the rack supports. The design pinches elements of traditional Japanese Cargo bike racks that were often used to haul 50kg+ loads. Its true that I haven't loaded it up and given it a good shake just yet but I am confident It will be up to the task and not rub on the wheel. The front Guard thingy you noticed on the front wheel is the basis of my own mud guard. It is made with some left over 13mm stainless steel flat bar. For the actual guard I am thinking of riveting or bolting some flat perspex or polypropylene plastic to it- depending on what material has better weathering qualities. I wanted extra clearance for my tyres and the ability to clean them easily- something I hope this design will achieve. The bike already has V brakes and they have a fairly good amount of stopping power so I don't think I'll need to replace them.

As for the wheels I am still a bit undecided. For the price and the amount of positive reviews I am liking what I hear about the Sun Rhyno Lites. I know the others I mentioned earlier are quality hoops as well, but for price and availability these ones are leading in my mind so far. A friend of mine actually had some good things to say about the SLX hubs from my bike's era- but i'd like more than just one opinion on these things. I haven't been able to find a clear bargain pack leader in hubs though. From what i've read people with the shimano XT hubs have had mixed experiences. I like the idea of using a set of Shimano hubs- if only for the sheer number of them out there and thus the availability of spares and parts. Any help would be great!

This is a great forum- thanks for all your help,
Mark

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rustguard
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby rustguard » Fri Jun 10, 2011 4:17 pm

I really like the rack, you could pile a house on top of it. not doubting the strength of the rack. It has nothing to do with strength. Just the design, although the corners on the twisted flat bar may wear through the skin of panniers.
Lateral, meaning side. Japanese racks probably weren't designed to carry panniers You need side support to stop the panniers rubbing on the tyres over the bumps.

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il padrone
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Fri Jun 10, 2011 6:11 pm

Your brakes (in that picture) are cantilever brakes. V-brakes have greater brake power than these.

I believe Sun no longer make the Rhyno-lites. Their top-level rim is the CR18, but I think the Rigida Andra 30 CSS are much tougher, and very hard wearing with their carbide treatment on the brake surface.
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mylesau
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mylesau » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:46 pm

Are you sure Sun Rhyno Lites are not longer made?

Still listed on SUN Ringle site along with the CR18s, which is a narrower rim, and there are plenty of Rhyno Lites still around. (They don't make the Rhyno any more.)

One I built up last weekend for a Cargo Bike I'm building:

Image

SUN Rhyno Lite XL, DT Swiss Competition DB spokes (32), an Alfine 8 and a Schwalbe XR from my dwindling supply (will be disc brake). I found about the same number of people suggesting 3-cross over 2-cross for the Alfine hub, so I stuck with 3-cross. Plenty strong, though I think 2-cross would have been fine too.

[Competition not Champion - edited]
Last edited by mylesau on Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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il padrone
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:56 pm

OK, seems like the Rhyno Lites are still made. Must have been the Rhynos that I was thinking about.

Anyway they are a bit too wide for my liking, but these complete wheels come at an amazing price !!

Image


[edit] I still reckon the Rigida Andra CSS rims would be better than the Rhyno Lites.
Last edited by il padrone on Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Vintagetourer » Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:09 pm

My Thorn Sherpa rigged and ready to go. Pics and Specs are at:

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page ... 88575&v=9V

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mylesau
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mylesau » Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:18 pm

It does look like a fire extinguisher. Nice bike that :)

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mlavis » Sat Jun 11, 2011 10:44 pm

Thanks for the link Il Padrone. It seems as though the Deore/Rhyno lite wheel build is a popular one with touring riders. Just a quick question, The one you linked to is built up in a 32 hole pattern and has the disc compatible hubs. Would the combination of the narrower flanges and the lower spoke count make the wheel too weak for big loads? I'm a slight rider (65kgs) but will have a substantial amount of gear as well. I know a lot of the wheel strength has to do with the spokes used and the skill in the truing. If the hub and rim are adequate would It be best to buy some really good spokes and re-build them myself?

Sorry about clogging up this thread with posts- I'm new to the forums. Should I start a new thread dedicated to my build or am I ok to keep doing what i'm doing?

Thanks everyone,
Mark

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il padrone
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Sat Jun 11, 2011 11:20 pm

I'd rate the Rigida Andras as better than the Sun Rhyno Lites due to their harder wearing brake surface and their slightly lighter weight. I've found all my rims in the past 18 years have failed due to brake wear. This is usually about every 5 years or so (20-25,000kms)for me, and people using the Rigidas report up to 20,000kms before there is even any initial signs of rim wear :shock: . I reckon I'll get about 10 years from my Rigidas. As an example of their wear, you know how normally you get a lot of brake dust on your rims? I always thought it came from the brake pads, but I'm not sure, now I think it's the rims mainly. Well the Rigidas have been in use for about 4 months now. I've only cleaned the bike two or three times and each time the rims have been clean - no black brake dirt. That means no rim alloy being worn off.

Sun have been the expedition rim for a long time, but now the Rigida Andra CSS rims are going to exceed them I believe.

With your weight (about the same as my son) you'll have few problems even with 32 hole rims. That is what he's been riding for the past 5-6 years, including a fair share of rough rides carrying a full touring load. If it really bothers you look around for a good deal on 36 hole rims.
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