My touring rig - post yours

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:30 am

mlavis wrote: I am preparing for a 2 year expedition style tour of SE and Central Asia. I am on a bit of a budget (would prefer to keep spending under control so I can fund the 2 years I'll need to complete the trip!).


Mark, considering the scope of the expedition you are planning I question the economics of upgrading this bike. If you are on a tight budget then last thing you want is a bike failure in some remote location where obtaining parts or repairs might be very expensive and time-consuming. Better to spend a little more up front to buy a new Surly Long Haul Trucker or similar bike and have confidence that there will be no unexpected imposts on your budget once on the road. If you do this up front then at least you are in control of your budget. You may have to work/save a little longer to raise the funds, but it will be worth it for the peace of mind.

BTW, I've posted some links on your thread about maps in the Touring Overseas forum.
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by BNA » Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:50 pm

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mlavis » Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:50 pm

So I went with the Sun Rhyno Lite rims (32h) laced to Shimano Deore XT hubs with DT swiss 2.0 spokes. I got the wheels for a total of $200AU with postage. I know the Rigida rims are better- but with such a good deal i'm ok with buying another set of these wheels mid way through the trip. That way i get brand new hubs too! I've also gone for a set of the 2010 shimano XT v brakes to replace the current cantilevers.

I considered your advice before I started, RonK, but i am happy with my decision to convert this bike. The frame is solid and fits me well- and after my completion of the build, I don't see why this bike won't be as reliable as the Surly and other similar bikes. There are no bespoke components so if anything does go wrong, I'm sure I will be able to fix it- or find replacement parts quite easily. I think too many people get caught up in the idea that you need the best new equipment out there to make a trip happen. If you do it yourself and are content with basic, older gear, you can do pretty amazing things with not a lot of money. Thats how i've managed to restore a wooden sailing boat, and get into kayaking by repairing tip finds while all on a student budget!

Thanks for all your help,
I'll post some completed pics in a week or two!
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby rustguard » Tue Jun 14, 2011 3:12 pm

mlavis wrote: I think too many people get caught up in the idea that you need the best new equipment out there to make a trip happen. If you do it yourself and are content with basic, older gear, you can do pretty amazing things with not a lot of money.
Mark

The new kit is nice but I agree with you here
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby hartleymartin » Tue Jun 14, 2011 11:38 pm

mlavis wrote:I think too many people get caught up in the idea that you need the best new equipment out there to make a trip happen. If you do it yourself and are content with basic, older gear, you can do pretty amazing things with not a lot of money. Thats how i've managed to restore a wooden sailing boat, and get into kayaking by repairing tip finds while all on a student budget!

Thanks for all your help,
I'll post some completed pics in a week or two!
Mark


I get by quite well using a touring bicycle nearly 30 years old. Unfortunately, it was the grit roads on my last tour that defeated the freewheel. I could have finished the tour, but I was not particularly enthused with the idea of having to ride a geared fixie for two days.

So a spare freewheel and its removal tool is now part of the spare-bits kit, which includes a spare brake and gear cable, chain, lubricant, shifter, 3x inner tubes, patch kit, etc.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Wed Jun 15, 2011 8:26 am

hartleymartin wrote:So a spare freewheel and its removal tool is now part of the spare-bits kit

I like to carry sufficient spares on remote trips, but even I would describe that as overkill :o

In many years of touring I have never struck a situation where a freewheel needed replacing. I've faced almost all other types of problems but freewheels/freehubs are pretty bomb-proof. At a pinch, with some kero and a container you should be able to flush out a freewheel to get it free-running then re-lube it. I don't deny you had problems, but I still don't advocate carrying a spare freewheel.

Must have been some grit you faced. Or else a broken pawl :?:

One trip I was on my son got an ocky strap caught in his rear wheel. Wound tight around the cassette. When cleared away we still had a fixed wheel :shock: . After removing the cassette (luckily we had the tools) it was still fixed. So between the group we had all the tools needed to do this job - cone spanners, cassette tool, chain whip and even some grease (just needed a 10mm hex key from the town garage). We took out the wheel bearings and axle, removed the freehub, cleared the tiny bits of elastic that were jamming it up, then rebuilt it, greased bearings and all. A few of our group learnt a few tips about bike repairs on that trip :wink:
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:37 am

mlavis wrote:I considered your advice before I started, RonK, but i am happy with my decision to convert this bike. The frame is solid and fits me well- and after my completion of the build, I don't see why this bike won't be as reliable as the Surly and other similar bikes. There are no bespoke components so if anything does go wrong, I'm sure I will be able to fix it- or find replacement parts quite easily.


Fine - if you are capable of building and maintaining your bike, and you are resourceful and tolerant when field repairs are needed, then you should have no problem.

I would be less confident about finding replacement parts. It depends exactly where you are of course, but there are many journals on CGOAB that report difficulty sourcing parts, high prices, and problems trying to have goods shipped when you don't have a fixed address. I would include the bottom bracket and possibly even the headset in your list of components to service or replace.

I'm intrigued by your choice of XT hubs. Don't get me wrong, they are a good choice - I used them myself on my last build. But you mentioned that the bike is 7-speed. Are you going to upgrade to 9-speed? And will the XT hubs fit within the frame spacing? It's my understanding that 7-speed hubs fit 126mm spacing and I know the XT hubs require 135mm spacing. A 9mm difference sounds quite a lot, but perhaps the frame can be stretched enough. Also it's possible the change of spacing will affect the chain line.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:45 am

il padrone wrote:
hartleymartin wrote:So a spare freewheel and its removal tool is now part of the spare-bits kit

I like to carry sufficient spares on remote trips, but even I would describe that as overkill :o

In many years of touring I have never struck a situation where a freewheel needed replacing. I've faced almost all other types of problems but freewheels/freehubs are pretty bomb-proof. At a pinch, with some kero and a container you should be able to flush out a freewheel to get it free-running then re-lube it. I don't deny you had problems, but I still don't advocate carrying a spare freewheel.

Must have been some grit you faced. Or else a broken pawl :?:


Yes, I've been wondering how grit got into the freewheel, and what would prevent it from happening again on the next dirt road. Martin would need a bucketful of spare freewheels to undertake the tour Mark is planning.

I learned to disassemble and service my freewheel, with the most basic of tools, at around age 13, so you could say it's child's play. :D :wink:
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Wed Jun 15, 2011 11:35 am

RonK wrote:I would be less confident about finding replacement parts. It depends exactly where you are of course, but there are many journals on CGOAB that report difficulty sourcing parts, high prices, and problems trying to have goods shipped when you don't have a fixed address. I would include the bottom bracket and possibly even the headset in your list of components to service or replace.

A standard sort of bike like Mark's mid-90s Trek 870 shouldn't be too much problem for spares. Make sure that you have quality BB and headset and you'll go thousands of kms. My old Sedona had an upgraded mid-range HG72 BB fitted mid '95 and it is still in it. Some creaking in Adelaide but fixed with a 'remove and lube threads'. The heaset was also upgraded to the Shimano M system cartridge in 1 1/8" size, but this is now not made. It has great cartridge bearings and I have spares for it, but never given me any problems.

Headset ball bearings for conventional loose ball headsets are still very readily available.

RonK wrote:And will the XT hubs fit within the frame spacing? It's my understanding that 7-speed hubs fit 126mm spacing and I know the XT hubs require 135mm spacing. A 9mm difference sounds quite a lot, but perhaps the frame can be stretched enough. Also it's possible the change of spacing will affect the chain line.

7spd MTB hubs of the mid-90s are 135mm spacing, same as for 9spd (7spd road hubs were 126mm and some earlier MTB hubs were 130mm). A change from 7 to 9 speed will require some changes to the wheel, but really just a swapping of a spacer from right-side to left-side. It's pretty simple, you just swap the freehub body, no redishing needed and chain-line was not an issue. I've done this change on two bikes now.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby hartleymartin » Sat Jun 18, 2011 1:25 am

RonK wrote:
il padrone wrote:
hartleymartin wrote:So a spare freewheel and its removal tool is now part of the spare-bits kit

I like to carry sufficient spares on remote trips, but even I would describe that as overkill :o

In many years of touring I have never struck a situation where a freewheel needed replacing. I've faced almost all other types of problems but freewheels/freehubs are pretty bomb-proof. At a pinch, with some kero and a container you should be able to flush out a freewheel to get it free-running then re-lube it. I don't deny you had problems, but I still don't advocate carrying a spare freewheel.

Must have been some grit you faced. Or else a broken pawl :?:


Yes, I've been wondering how grit got into the freewheel, and what would prevent it from happening again on the next dirt road. Martin would need a bucketful of spare freewheels to undertake the tour Mark is planning.

I learned to disassemble and service my freewheel, with the most basic of tools, at around age 13, so you could say it's child's play. :D :wink:


Well, the engineering shop in Taralga couldn't do anything to revive it. I gave the fellow $10 for his trouble.

I had noticed the freewheel running a bit rough at the end of the second day. I intended to flood it with some motor oil to smooth it out, but something went seriously wrong. Grit in the freewheel mechanism evidently destroyed one of the ball bearings which in turn destroyed the rest of the mechanism. I have never known a freewheel to die like that EVER, which is why I never carried a spare. Apparently the grit from Wombeyan Caves road is a particularly harsh sort. I reckon that the grit would have stayed out if I had got around to purchasing a couple of mud-flaps for my mudguards.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby gordy » Sat Jul 02, 2011 5:25 pm

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby mlavis » Thu Jul 28, 2011 6:09 pm

Hi guys,
Its been a while but i have been chipping away at my touring bike build. I got the sun rhyno-lite/shimano deore wheels, a new rear cassette and new Deore V brakes. Its completely functional now-however i'd like to replace the continental travel contact tyres with some Schwable Marathon Extreme 26x2.25 tyres and replace the bottom bracket head stem bearings before I go on any great expedition. The whole experience of building the bike has been really great and i'd like to thank you all for your wealth of information and advice. I think I've achieved a pretty nice compromise between quality components and value for money. All up the whole build has cost me under $750 so far. Once the weather has warmed up a little bit i'm keen to put it to the test with some long weekend rides in an around Namadgi national park here in the ACT.

Here are some pics of the 'nearly' finished product!
Image
Image
Image

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby elStado » Thu Jul 28, 2011 11:13 pm

Mark; looks pretty good and I'm impressed that you did it for that price. Good job.

I would agree on getting the bottom bracket and headset replaced or at least reconditioned before you head out.

I think I might do something similar, rather than spending lots of cash on a fancy a titanium bike. ;)
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Wingnut » Fri Aug 05, 2011 8:31 pm

Updated my touring bike from my old Norco mtb...

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Baalzamon » Fri Aug 05, 2011 8:37 pm

Wingnut wrote:Updated my touring bike from my old Norco mtb...

Image
Image



OOH nice a troll :D
Got plans to run a rohloff on that in future?
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Wingnut » Fri Aug 05, 2011 8:51 pm

If I could afford to update to a Rohloff I would do it asap! A bit hard at the moment as I've gone back to school so now I'm a poor student. :cry:

I also plan to get a BOB Ibex later in the year as I would like to tour Tassie with my specially made surfboard cut down for touring...

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby il padrone » Fri Aug 05, 2011 8:58 pm

Sounds like the Xtracycle/Big Dummy could be more your sort of touring kit :wink:

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Wingnut » Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:24 pm

I was thinking more like this...my custom surfboard is a foot shorter than the one in this pic & lighter too. I could also carry my wetsuit & other gear in the trailer.

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:06 pm

Wingnut wrote:Updated my touring bike from my old Norco mtb...

Nice rack - nice pump - nice colour - in fact it's very nice all over. Well done...
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Wingnut » Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:16 am

RonK wrote:
Wingnut wrote:Updated my touring bike from my old Norco mtb...

Nice rack - nice pump - nice colour - in fact it's very nice all over. Well done...


Thanks for the nice comments. :D I'm sure there are nicer bikes out there but I like it.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby RonK » Sat Aug 06, 2011 8:14 am

Wingnut wrote:
RonK wrote:
Wingnut wrote:Updated my touring bike from my old Norco mtb...

Nice rack - nice pump - nice colour - in fact it's very nice all over. Well done...


Thanks for the nice comments. :D I'm sure there are nicer bikes out there but I like it.

And what a leap up from your old Norco MTB.

I've never seen a picture of a completed Troll before - and looking at pics of the bare Troll frame I thought all the unused attachment points would be a little fussy and untidy. But now I can see they are hardly noticeable. For anyone looking to build a bike your example gives plenty of incentive to consider the Troll.

The Cosmo and Nova racks really do add a touch of class, which is the reason I used them on my Sabbath, and will also use them on my VN Pioneer, so it's good to see how they look with 26" wheels.

So all up a very nice looking bike built with quality components - no doubt you'll get a lot satisfaction and pleasure from it...
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Aushiker » Sat Aug 06, 2011 10:53 am

Wingnut wrote:Updated my touring bike from my old Norco mtb...


That looks really good. Now you have me thinking ... :)

BTW you should post your pictures over at http://forums.mtbr.com/surly/post-pics- ... 76-16.html . I am sure they will be awed at :)

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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby stubbie » Sat Aug 06, 2011 1:29 pm

Wingnut wrote:I was thinking more like this...my custom surfboard is a foot shorter than the one in this pic & lighter too. I could also carry my wetsuit & other gear in the trailer.

Image


Slightly OT but what brand of rain jacket are you wearing in that pic Wingnut?
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby LHT » Sat Aug 06, 2011 1:59 pm

I met a guy who had cycled from Melbourne to Hervey Bay towing his surfboard on a trailer, and he was riding a fixie too! - said he would never do it again..

Love the pics. 8)
Last edited by LHT on Sat Aug 06, 2011 4:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby LHT » Sat Aug 06, 2011 2:07 pm

My ever faithful mule and I have been solo touring Aus for 13 months now.

Here it is resplendantly impersonating a metal and plastic camel somewhere down in the south east Kimberely, carrying 20 litres of water and food for 4 days.

Bike has been truly great, I built it all myself. Only the usual things have worn out from hard work, I can't complain about it one little bit.

Cheers from Steve; quite often humbly meeting cyclists that have been touring the world for 2-3 years, they make me look intermediate and especially some of you noisy lot here look like rank beginners!!!!

edit; not even the mighty marathons can resist the three corner jacks of the north, sadly.


Image

Image
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Re: My touring rig - post yours

Postby Wingnut » Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:11 pm

stubbie wrote:
Wingnut wrote:I was thinking more like this...my custom surfboard is a foot shorter than the one in this pic & lighter too. I could also carry my wetsuit & other gear in the trailer.

Image


Slightly OT but what brand of rain jacket are you wearing in that pic Wingnut?


Lol, that's not me...just a pic from a blog I found on the net.
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