Stoves and Cookwear

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Aushiker
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Fri Dec 16, 2016 10:50 am

The picture ...

Image

The marketing blurb ...

The newest offering from Korean outdoor company Kovea, the Hydra multi-fuel stove is compatible with both isobutane and white gasoline—and you won’t have to change nozzles to switch between fuels. Simply flick the switch and you’re ready to go. This versatile stove provides a powerful, evenly distributed flame and can boil a liter of water in about 3.5 minutes. Plus, because it’s designed to prime the fuel before it reaches the head, it makes less noise than many other stoves. The Hydra weighs [310 grams] and features stable support legs for safe, level cooking.


The crux of the "deal" ...

Massdrop have a drop on the Kovea Hydra Dual-Fuel single nozzle multi fuel stove. The price is US$119.99 + $24 postage.
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tmac100
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby tmac100 » Wed Dec 28, 2016 2:25 am

Thanks for this. It sounds like a nice alternative to other-dual fuel models (Primus, I think). However, today (Dec 27/16) the Massdrop has ended. Maybe later it will resume.

I found this critique by a Google search - with a stand for inversion of the gas canister during cold-weather use (Europe/Canada/USA).

http://sectionhiker.com/the-kovea-hydra ... ing-stove/

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Tue Jan 03, 2017 10:00 pm

Massdrop have a drop on the Snow Peak Titanium cookset. US$69.99 + $11.75 postage.

Image
Source: Massdrop
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Mon Feb 13, 2017 4:55 pm

Aushiker wrote:Massdrop have a drop on the Snow Peak Titanium cookset. US$69.99 + $11.75 postage.

Image
Source: Massdrop


It is back at Massdrop ... same price.
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tmac100
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby tmac100 » Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:27 am

In addition to those Ti cooking items, Massdrop has recently had a variety of cook stoves. Right now there a Primus, I believe, on offer.

I just received notice that my latest stove purchase has been shipped by Massdrop. It is a Kovea cannister stove. Fortunately, I
was able to purchase a used Kovea (like the one you indicate at the top of this page) in Canada on MEC's gear swap site. Now to eventually get it from my son in Canada...

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Parker » Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:38 pm

I have read the entire thread but I am still confused as to which stove and cookware to buy for two people?

Money is not really an issue in this instance, we are happy to purchase products which will be long lasting.

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:20 pm

Parker wrote:I have read the entire thread but I am still confused as to which stove and cookware to buy for two people?

Money is not really an issue in this instance, we are happy to purchase products which will be long lasting.

The questions to answer are:

1. What kind of food/preparation will you do? Are you going to actually cook, or will you simply rehydrate dried food?
2. How will you carry your camp kitchen? Is size/weight/volume likely to be an issue?

When carrying capacity is an issue, most campers will opt for freeze-fried meals/soups/beverages that only require the boiling of water to prepare, a compact gas canister stove such as the Kovea Spider, a titanium pot and mug and perhaps a folding plate or bowl. Of these, a remote canister stove such as the Kovea Spider allows the canister to be inverted for reliable operation in cold conditions.

If carrying capacity is not an issue then you might choose shellite pressure stove such as an MSR, or a metho stove such as a Trangia. Generally both the stove and the fuel is bulkier. A point to keep in mind is that most of this type of stoves have poor simmer control.

If you actually want to cook then you will probably need heavier pots which will transfer and diffuse heat much better than titanium pots.

I have used each of these types of stoves. Regardless of cooking type, my preference is for gas canister stoves. They are compact and easy to carry, quiet, have excellent simmer control and are safe to use with no risk of flare-ups. The fuel is light and burns cleanly, with no risk of messy leaks contaminating your food and gear.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Parker » Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:59 pm

RonK wrote:
Parker wrote:I have read the entire thread but I am still confused as to which stove and cookware to buy for two people?

Money is not really an issue in this instance, we are happy to purchase products which will be long lasting.

The questions to answer are:

1. What kind of food/preparation will you do? Are you going to actually cook, or will you simply rehydrate dried food?
2. How will you carry your camp kitchen? Is size/weight/volume likely to be an issue?

When carrying capacity is an issue, most campers will opt for freeze-fried meals/soups/beverages that only require the boiling of water to prepare, a compact gas canister stove such as the Kovea Spider, a titanium pot and mug and perhaps a folding plate or bowl. Of these, a remote canister stove such as the Kovea Spider allows the canister to be inverted for reliable operation in cold conditions.

If carrying capacity is not an issue then you might choose shellite pressure stove such as an MSR, or a metho stove such as a Trangia. Generally both the stove and the fuel is bulkier. A point to keep in mind is that most of this type of stoves have poor simmer control.

If you actually want to cook then you will probably need heavier pots which will transfer and diffuse heat much better than titanium pots.

I have used each of these types of stoves. Regardless of cooking type, my preference is for gas canister stoves. They are compact and easy to carry, quiet, have excellent simmer control and are safe to use with no risk of flare-ups. The fuel is light and burns cleanly, with no risk of messy leaks contaminating your food and gear.


We are working up to the Munda Biddi trail next year. I suspect in most cases for our current touring that there will be towns every couple of days but I would like to experiment with options to start with.

We will be carrying everything on our frames, no issues there, at the moment it's just Frame bags however experimentation is the key at this point. So by the looks of it we should consider small and mighty. I suspect for the Munda Biddi it will be a mixture of reheat and pubs.

I will consider the Kovea.

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Feb 15, 2017 8:34 pm

Parker wrote:We are working up to the Munda Biddi trail next year. I suspect in most cases for our current touring that there will be towns every couple of days but I would like to experiment with options to start with.

We will be carrying everything on our frames, no issues there, at the moment it's just Frame bags however experimentation is the key at this point. So by the looks of it we should consider small and mighty. I suspect for the Munda Biddi it will be a mixture of reheat and pubs.

So with frame bags you will definitely constrained for space. Here is my camp kitchen setup, selected specifically to fit into an Anything bag and carried on one fork leg. There is another Anything bag on the other fork leg as my tucker bag.

Here is a picture of my framebag setup on a shakedown tour at Xmas. I have another Anything bag to fit under the downtube for my tent, but in scorching temps I didn't need to carry four-seasons camping gear or clothing.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Sat Mar 25, 2017 3:43 pm

One for Aidan :)

The Primus OmniLite Ti stove is on offer at Massdrop. Looking at AU$188 delivered which seems a lot to me but then I am not into these flame throwers :)

Image

For something a little more gentle in the bush ... they also have the Snow Peak Litemax Titanium stove as a drop. Looking at around AU$69 delivered.

Image
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:04 pm

[quote="Aushiker"]Primus OmniLite Ti is back at Massdrop ... AU$188 on your nearest stump.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Sat Jun 17, 2017 5:30 pm

Aushiker wrote:One for Aidan :)

Primus OmniLite Ti[/url] stove is on offer at Massdrop. Looking at AU$188 delivered which seems a lot to me but then I am not into these flame throwers :)


I don't think the price per see is particularly indecent when comparing to similar units, but I would warn aficionados that the Ti version takes more preheating than other heavier built "furnaces", thus you'll use more meths preheating than some other stoves and the meths quickly adds up.

The lack of weight is definitely a bonus but all in all, this hasn't made me feel inclined to stop missing my Optimus 111T.

I did buy an adapter to use the stove in my Trangia but I think due to the weight I'd be more inclined to take one or other as opposed to both.

Info for those tempted to look at Trangia conversion can be found:
https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/p ... gia.26152/

Sorry its a page at Classic Camp Stoves whose site is currently down and to add insult to injury you will likely need to sign up to follow my link or do a search at the site.

Heres a tube page showing a conversion;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WWFyTDPueY

The conversion is achieved with one of these:
http://www.ebay.ie/itm/Trangia-Multi-Bu ... 2029151833
(Wow, I didn't pay anything like that for postage for mine :shock: )

Which is what Trangia utilised with Primus I believe to create with the Omnifuel to come up with the Trangia X2 multi fuel burner.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Sat Sep 23, 2017 4:53 pm

RonK wrote:Since I now use a Kovea Spider instead of a Pocket Rocket, I don't have to precariously balance the pot on top of a canister-mounted burner, so the small ones are just fine.


Are you still using the Kovea Spider Ron?
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:10 pm

Aushiker wrote:
RonK wrote:Since I now use a Kovea Spider instead of a Pocket Rocket, I don't have to precariously balance the pot on top of a canister-mounted burner, so the small ones are just fine.


Are you still using the Kovea Spider Ron?

Yes, it's a winner for mine.

It is part of a carefully considered kit for bikepacking. Note how it all fits together in this post.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:31 pm

RonK wrote:Yes, it's a winner for mine.


Thanks. That was the information I was looking for earlier. BTW your mention of the carbon felt wind shield caught my eye. Did you buy this or make it up yourself?

Also good to see you are using the 220g canisters. I had assumed they would be too big, but maybe I should actually test that theory with my kit :)
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:48 pm

The carbon felt windscreen came from Tier Gear in Tassie. I don’t see it on the web site anymore but it wouldn't hurt to email them.

I use either size canister depending on need. But in my anything bag it doesn’t make much difference which size I carry.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:26 am

Image

The EZ Eco is the “canisterless” version of the Kovea Alpine Pot. The Alpine Pot is Kovea’s take on a Jetboil type stove. What this means is it has a tank which you refill.

More information in Hikin Jim's review at Section Hiker.
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