Touring weight

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Touring weight

Postby Davidkmendel » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:46 pm

I was wondering what peoples packed weight is for touring including bags panniers etc. But not weight of bike and racks.
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by BNA » Mon Feb 04, 2013 5:45 pm

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Re: Touring weight

Postby RonK » Mon Feb 04, 2013 5:45 pm

20 kgs max, including 4 season clothing and equipment - no exceptions.
Last edited by RonK on Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby il padrone » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:04 pm

That is going to depend a lot on where you are going to ride, what sort of terrain, and how long you will be out between supply points and/or in total.

I would normally pack about 23kgs of gear including some basic food (for one night/two days). In the mountains I might try to keep this lower but you do need more clothes for bad weather changes and food for the days away from civilisation. In Central Australia recently we had up to 60kgs of gear (20kgs clothing, camping gear etc; 23kgs water; 15-20kgs food). We still rode 70-90kms on the sealed roads, often in half a day due to the heat, and 50-60kms on the dirt.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby Vintagetourer » Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:45 pm

Davidkmendel wrote:I was wondering what peoples packed weight is for touring including bags panniers etc. But not weight of bike and racks.

Depends...but somewhere between 14 and 25 kg.

e.g.Equipment list, inc. weights at
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page ... 79753&v=LM
for a reasonably challenging tour which included remote country.

This luggage list has been made lot lighter for other types of tours.

20 kg is a good target, but higher or lower is reasonable if appropriate for the type of tour.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby Mike Ayling » Tue Feb 05, 2013 7:37 am

You can save a few grams here and there.
I never bring a fork and manage to get by with a spoon and my small Swiss Army pocket knife (there is also a blade on my Leatherman Wave
but this is heavy and I am considering leaving it at home in future.)
I don't bring a bowl but eat (including breakfast cold cereal) from one of the Trangia saucepans.
Do you need two Trangia saucepans?
Do you need the Trangia frypan?

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Re: Touring weight

Postby iacl » Tue Feb 05, 2013 8:19 am

Mike Ayling wrote:You can save a few grams here and there.
I never bring a fork and manage to get by with a spoon and my small Swiss Army pocket knife (there is also a blade on my Leatherman Wave
but this is heavy and I am considering leaving it at home in future.)
I don't bring a bowl but eat (including breakfast cold cereal) from one of the Trangia saucepans.
Do you need two Trangia saucepans?
Do you need the Trangia frypan?

Mike


Sounds a bit complicated. If its just me, I use the mini trangia. I use / prefer a dedicated knife for cooking / eating with a spork.

Everyone's a bit different.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby RonK » Tue Feb 05, 2013 8:32 am

Mike Ayling wrote:Do you need two Trangia saucepans?
Do you need the Trangia frypan?

Do you need a Trangia? :lol:
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Re: Touring weight

Postby rifraf » Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:14 pm

RonK wrote:
Mike Ayling wrote:Do you need two Trangia saucepans?
Do you need the Trangia frypan?

Do you need a Trangia? :lol:

Is "Not if your strong enough to carry an Optimus" the right answer? :lol:
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Re: Touring weight

Postby iacl » Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:20 pm

RonK wrote:
Mike Ayling wrote:Do you need two Trangia saucepans?
Do you need the Trangia frypan?

Do you need a Trangia? :lol:


Everyone needs a trangia :geek: just takes some longer than others to realise. I need a cuppa when I want one, not when or if I find the next open store.

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Re: Touring weight

Postby il padrone » Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:31 pm

Don't start the Trangia versus MSR flame-war :o

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Trangia wins anyway :mrgreen:
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Re: Touring weight

Postby Tim » Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:49 pm

rifraf wrote:Is "Not if your strong enough to carry an Optimus" the right answer? :lol:


Of course it is. Svea123, better than any of 'em.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby rifraf » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:03 pm

I have to admit, I've gotten used to my Trangia and have come to appreciate its lack of needed maintenance and its relatively lightness of weight.
I doesn't bring out the boy in me like the Optimus 111C did but then I doubt it will raise the ire of airport authorities either. Theres arguably less bulky and somewhat lighter alternatives, but they tend to cost more and arnt as self contained and potentially clean an alcohol stove as the Trangia. Packed up correctly, its unlikely to leave a carbonated mess in my panniers like some might (another reason I liked the Optimus). I think the change in attitude came about more from not being in a mad rush whilst on tour. The Trangia is a little slower than my past multi fuel stoves but I'm now more C'est La Vie and relaxed in general.
If my cuppa takes a couple of minutes longer to appear thats a couple of minutes longer to gaze around and appreciate my surroundings and wonder why it took me so long to get on the bike and tour since last time. :D
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Re: Touring weight

Postby RonK » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:13 pm

MSR be damned!

We've been through this before. The Clikstand Denali combo is less than half the bulk and half the weight of a trangia. The entire stove fits in the 900ml pot, along with lighter, Chux and sponge/scourer. Then it all snuggles neatly into the radiused bottom corner of an Ortlieb Front Roller pannier.

And it passes the ultimate cooking test for lightweight stoves - making scrambled eggs and omelettes.

Image
Just 226 grams.

Image
5.35 inches in diameter, 2.52 inches deep.
Last edited by RonK on Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:20 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby rifraf » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:17 pm

Tim wrote:Of course it is. Svea123, better than any of 'em.

There are things I do love about the Svea123, especially since its "about" the lightest petroleum fuel stove I've used. I do find having to go to Bunnings to get fuel for one a bit of an inconvenience and I have an inherent dislike of aluminum cookware (referring to the top/pot). The hardest thing about going to the Trangia for me was trying to trust the alloy pots despite the hard anodised "plating". I'm not a fan of cookware that isnt inert. (Long pause here awaiting Ronks pump of Ti pot :wink: ).
Tim how did you get on getting a substitute pot for your 123?
I seem to remember you had an idea of a close fit replacement. I dont remember asking you if you were aware that you could run alternative fuels in your stove via a change of jet and the addition of the pump marketed as an 8R optional extra. :idea:

Above - pipped at the post :wink:
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Re: Touring weight

Postby rifraf » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:29 pm

RonK wrote:We've been through this before. The Clikstand stove is less than half the bulk and half the weight of a trangia. The entire stove fits in the 900ml pot, along with lighter, Chux and sponge/scourer. Then it all snuggles neatly into the radiused bottom corner of an Ortlieb Front Roller pannier.

And it passes the ultimate cooking test for lightweight stoves - making scrambled eggs and omelettes.
Just 226 grams.
5.35 inches in diameter, 2.52 inches deep.

This is the "only" alcohol stove alternative I'd consider :!: However its lighter "partly" because it doesnt come with two pots and a kettle (for one granted) :!:
What is the outer measurements of the pot it all sits in? (Out of curiosity) I mean "how much" less bulky :?:
Damn it you've answered before I've managed to post :roll:
I've been meaning to ask you what you wrap it in to keep any soot off the innards of your pannier? The fact that it is "any" less bulky and weighty means it is a serious contender when next I upgrade as I tend to only really use one post when cooking on tour but I do wonder about the lack of kettle. I like to relax with a cuppa during cooking and after my meal and having to wash up first doesn't appeal at all to me.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby Vintagetourer » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:56 pm

Stoves (or not) is a weight saving consideration ...

but clothing, and footwear, is probably the luggage category where less experienced tourers tend to over cater, and where the main weight savings potential is.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby RonK » Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:58 pm

rifraf wrote:I've been meaning to ask you what you wrap it in to keep any soot off the innards of your pannier? The fact that it is "any" less bulky and weighty means it is a serious contender when next I upgrade as I tend to only really use one post when cooking on tour but I do wonder about the lack of kettle. I like to relax with a cuppa during cooking and after my meal and having to wash up first doesn't appeal at all to me.

C'mon Aidan, it's a premium product and comes with its own stuff sack. :lol: The Evernew burner burns very cleanly and does not produce much soot. And titanium is easy to clean - the small amount of soot that is deposited on the pot is easily removed with the sponge scourer and Chux.

To live with one pot, you just need to be organised. For breakfast, I measure and boil the right quantity of water for tea and porridge. For dinner I boil water for soup, then make or heat my meal, then give the pot a quick wash and boil water for tea.

I also carry a Sea to Summit 3-piece Xset. The plate make a good base for the stove if I have to use it in the tent, and is also a good cutting board. Packed in the pouch, it fits neatly behind the mesh pocket of the same Ortlieb Front Roller Plus as the stove. The rest of the space is then available for food and also a few odds and sods.

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Re: Touring weight

Postby rifraf » Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:04 pm

Vintagetourer wrote:Stoves (or not) is a weight saving consideration ...

but clothing, and footwear, is probably the luggage category where less experienced tourers tend to over cater, and where the main weight savings potential is.

I agree with this sentiment. Riding from NSW to WA I left a trail easily followed, by Hansel and Gretal, of clothing instead of breadcrumbs.
For the first part of the journey anyway - I learnt quickly about the clothes.
I didnt do so bad with the footwear department though as I only took my cycling shoes and a pair of thongs/Jandals.
For extended tours in future I think I'll rely on Op shops for extra warm clothing if the weathers turns south.
Carrying too much water and food due to not enough research hindered me a lot right up until about the half way mark where I was probably dragging about
10 - 15kg more than I should have on my trailer. I was a slow learner in this regard.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby il padrone » Tue Feb 05, 2013 5:20 pm

RonK wrote:We've been through this before. The Clikstand Denali combo is less than half the bulk and half the weight of a trangia.

Glad you like it. Doesn't suit my needs :wink:
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Re: Touring weight

Postby Vintagetourer » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:03 pm

"Carrying too much water and food"

Yes I still find it hard to estimate the consumables without under- or over- catering. It is of course always pleasant not to carry the excess weight, but it is less pleasant being caught short of supplies because of unexpected circumstances when travelling in unfamiliar areas where food outlets and/or water are unpredictable.

Speaking of consumables, on my most recent tour I gave 1 litre of stove fuel a free 1000 km ride because I used less than expected for various reasons. A bit of a bugger but that's the way it turned out.

Spares and tools are another luggage category which I think tourers tend to carry too much of. I carry very few these days. Slightly risky but so far so good. On numerous tours in the early years I didn't mind carting them out, then carting them back unused but now I'd prefer to save the weight.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby Mike Ayling » Wed Feb 06, 2013 12:59 pm

il padrone wrote:
RonK wrote:We've been through this before. The Clikstand Denali combo is less than half the bulk and half the weight of a trangia.

Glad you like it. Doesn't suit my needs :wink:


Pete,

Could you share with us why you prefer a Trangia over the new fangled Clikstand Denail combo.

Mike
(Who is not contemplating dropping $160 on a new stove any time soon)
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Re: Touring weight

Postby il padrone » Wed Feb 06, 2013 1:44 pm

My Trangia has two pots, and a kettle to boot. These pots are 1.75 and 1.5 litres (I have always used the larger 25-1 model) which I find to be a useful size for cooking in - a bit small to do pasta for >1 person, but OK. The whole kit packs together very neatly with everything I need apart from fuel, to do the evening meal.

I hear of and at times see people cooking some dehy meal in a 600ml soup mug. It's not the way I fly.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby elStado » Wed Mar 06, 2013 12:09 pm

I had around 14kg of gear, plus ~4kg of consumables like food/fuel/water etc. The weight of which varied throughout the day. My pannier and handlebar bags were the heaviest items!

Add this to a ~15kg bike (inc the racks, lights and guards).. the weight quickly adds up. Not much fun when you have to carry the bike and all the gear up and down stairs either.
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Re: Touring weight

Postby bumblebea » Mon Apr 15, 2013 8:43 am

changing the subject from cooking but still on weight - what kind of locks do people use for touring? i've noticed on websites that the weight of locks is rarely listed. are there any good secure locks that are fairly light or do you just have to find some happy medium and balance out whether you prefer light weight or security?

appreciate any advice!

thanks, b
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Re: Touring weight

Postby RonK » Mon Apr 15, 2013 8:58 am

bumblebea wrote:changing the subject from cooking but still on weight - what kind of locks do people use for touring?

Generally I've not found much need for a lock in tour. I have a lightweight cable lock I can use while I make a quick dash into a shop, but rarely feel the need to use it.
Ultimately, if you want to avoid theft then always keep your bike and gear in sight.
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