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Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 12:20 pm
by J Quinton
RonK wrote:Very impressive way to quiet the doubting Thomases. Can't really see what brand/model your bike is James. What wheels are you using - they look to have plenty of spokes?

Disc brakes should not have that problem.


The bike is a re-stickered standard Taiwanese frame imported by a bike shop in Perth. It has been impressively strong actually.

The wheels are a combination of Easton Vista and Easton EA50. The older Easton Vista with Velomax hubs are tougher than a panzer. I picked up a set of EA50 for like $200 from CELL bikes, but they're not as good as the VISTA, in my opinion. I'm sure there are many cheap strong wheelsets out there. Not sure the spoke count exactly, just take some spares, although I've never broken one.

Yes disc brakes should sort out the rock issues.

I guess the thing for me is, I want a bike I will use at home as well. Seems a bit silly to have a dedicated touring bike. I might decide to go bushwalking and not go touring for a few years.

Ronk, is there much gravel in NZ?

Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 1:16 pm
by RonK
Sounds good - I'm with you thinking I'd like a roadie that I could use for a credit card tour. The Roubaix should be capable even straight off the shelf.

I can only speak of the South Island, but you can have an excellent tour without ever riding on unsealed roads.

But if you seek them out as I did last visit, there are plenty of opportunities to get your wheels dirty. I rode the Otago Rail Trail, Dansey's Pass, Hakataramea Pass, Oteake NP, Thomsons Gorge, Von River/Mavora Lakes Road on that trip, and will tackle the Molesworth and Rainbow roads on a future visit.

Then there's the North Island.

Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 2:44 pm
by RonK
il padrone wrote:Never seen any hipsters around here using them. If it flat-out works that's all that matters to me.

There must be some hipsters around there using them surely? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 4:14 pm
by GregLR
Good to see Carradice bags getting a mention. I have 'Nelson Longflap' (18 litre) and 'Camper Longflap' (24 litre) saddlebags from the early 90s - pre bike hipster days but also pre availability of the SQR & Bagman attachment mechanisms. For a long time I put up with the sway on day and weekend trips & commuting to work because I didn't know any different. But for a 4-week tour of SE Queensland in 1996 I decided to use the Nelson instead of panniers to save weight. To eliminate the sway I secured it to the carrier rack on my touring bike with an octopus strap - not very pretty but effective.

I've used the bags in the same way on many tours and weekend trips since then but I didn't get around to buying the attachment mechanisms that Carradice now offers, though a good audax friend swears by both of those mechanisms and hates the extra weight of a carrier rack on long audax rides. For the two bikes I use for audax & long day rides I have Wayne Kotzur custom-built racks made of relatively light chromoly tubing with a gauge suitable for carrying a rack pack rather than panniers - these racks weigh about 400g, which I consider isn't much of a problem.

But I don't always use a carrier rack & rack pack for audax & long day rides - I also have two bags that attach to a seatpost by way of a Rixen-Kaul 'Klick-Fix" mechanism, for example: http://www.vaude.com/en-GB/Products/Bik ... black.html & http://www.klickfix.de/index.php?mod=1&lang=en

Greg

Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 5:12 pm
by STC67
RonK wrote:
J Quinton wrote:Slap some slightly wider, more robust wheels on a carbon fibre roadie with a large saddle and handlebar bag.

If you're doing the Gibb River Road or similar get an extra wheel with panniers.

I think when I left Kunnunarra for Derby on the Gibb the entire setup weighed about 20-25kg.

More panniers just means taking more stuff you don't need.

Jeez, I'm with you there, my roadie is getting a bit long in the tooth - I've had it since 2006, and maybe it's time to think about a new one.

Perhaps a Specialized Roubaix SL4 Expert Disc

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Then I can just clip on one of these...

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and one of these, and I'll be ready to tour as well...
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Looks like it is sitting very high on the bike. Not having a crack, but why wouldn't you just fit a rack and take 1 pannier? is it a weight issue? I would have thought the little bit of extra weight would be offset by more balance on the bike.

Thanks

Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:03 pm
by RonK
STC67 wrote:Looks like it is sitting very high on the bike. Not having a crack, but why wouldn't you just fit a rack and take 1 pannier? is it a weight issue? I would have thought the little bit of extra weight would be offset by more balance on the bike.

That is actually the low position. I would want it in the high position, so that the bag is behind me and out of the airflow.

Like this.
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This is to be my roadie, and I want to use this setup for a bit of credit card touring. I will carry only a few kg on the rack. And being a roadie it doesn't have any mounting points for a rack anyway.

I met a bloke in EnZed doing exactly this - he was riding a CF roadie with a seat post rack, carrying just a set of street clothes and a rain jacket. He told me he was covering around 200km per day - not that I'd want to be traveling that fast, but 100km per day would be quite easily doable.

Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:12 pm
by Tim
STC67 wrote:Perhaps a Specialized Roubaix SL4 Expert Disc

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Nice bike Ron, but, it is fitted with a BB30 bottom bracket.
I have a Cannondale CAAD9 with the same FSA cranks and BB30. The cranks have been trouble free for over 17,000km's. I can't say the same for the bearings (BB30).
I've stated my opinion and experience of BB30 systems numerous times in the past, I don't need to again.
In short, I wouldn't go near it.
Maybe fit a conversion sleeve and conventional bottom bracket, or maybe consider a different bike.

Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:19 am
by RonK
Tim wrote:I've stated my opinion and experience of BB30 systems numerous times in the past, I don't need to again.
In short, I wouldn't go near it.
Maybe fit a conversion sleeve and conventional bottom bracket, or maybe consider a different bike.

Yeah, I hear you Tim. But there are not many bikes that have all the attributes I like in the Roubaix.

If I couldn't live with the BB30 I'd probably fit a Praxis conversion.

Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 2:03 pm
by Tim
Ron, it could be that Specialised machine the frame bottom bracket shell to more exact tolerances than Cannondale. I've not read of any BB30 problems specific to that brand. Mostly just Cannondale and Boardman.
If the bearings seat properly, with no movement, they seem to last quite well. Mine have done around 15,000km's having been held in place with Loctite.
The CAAD is a dry weather bike only though. Another BB30 drawback is the limited water resistance. The plastic grommet on the cartridge is the only bearing seal, at least it is on my CAAD9, it might be better enclosed on the Specialised bikes.

I had this reply from Praxis re their BB converter a year or two back when I contacted them. It seems to be the best option;

Tim,
Just measure your frame bb shell width.... most likely it's a 68mm road width, but just check.

You'll want the 68mm BB30 Conversion most likely.

We can't guarantee it won't creak as frames mfg'ers have too many tolerance issues... it's just the reality.
BUT...we will guarantee ours has the best chance of NOT creaking in your frame as our collet design is made for even pressure throughout the frame shell.

We think you'll like it!



THE PRAXIS TEAM
Santa Cruz County, Ca
831-708-2161 p
831-708-2511 f

I do like the look of the Roubaix. Very nice.
I just splurged on a new road bike. 2013 Giant TCR Advanced SL 1 (11 Speed Mechanical Dura Ace). (Too flash for me.) I couldn't resist the $1500 discount on RRP.
I find it hard to admit that I am now a fully-fledged carbon fibre convert :D . I love it.

Re: Lightweight Touring Considerations

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2013 4:25 pm
by grasshopper
STC67 wrote:Has anyone considered a MTB double on their tourer?

Bit late but I've been away. I've been using a double (SRAM road compact/XX rear) on my tourer/cx bike for over three years. No problem, except for confusing the occasional wrench. :wink: