My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Lots of steel bikes
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby Lots of steel bikes » Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:11 pm

GaryF wrote:
Lots of steel bikes wrote:
P!N20 wrote:^

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Nice looking Pinarello "Lots" with an interesting mix of top components. It looks like a great set-up and the black decals do look the part. My favourite component is what I think is an old ITM seatpost.

Yes, I think it is an ITM. Same as on my Barecci.

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GaryF
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:32 pm

Thanks Lots of Steel Bikes. This stem really suits your yellow bike too. 2 very nice bikes indeed. Is the Barecci built from Columbus MAX?

I'd like to find an ITM post in 25mm dia. for my ALAN. There is another ITM seatpost of a similar vintage that would suit my ALAN even better but it's very rare. It is scolloped on both sides of the seatpost shaft and anodised black in the scollops.
Last edited by GaryF on Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby Lots of steel bikes » Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:50 pm

GaryF wrote:Thanks Lots of Steel Bikes. This stem really suits your yellow bike too. 2 very nice bikes indeed. Is the Barecci built from Columbus MAX?

I'd like to find on in 25mm dia. for my ALAN. There is another ITM seatpost That would suit even better but it's very rare.

It would be nice if it was MAX. It’s actually Aelle. Rides very nicely.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Thu Jan 18, 2018 8:20 pm

There's nothing wrong with Aelle. As you state, it rides very nicely.

The only problem is probably my eyesight.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:05 pm

Here we go again.....

Surely this is the last Colnago.....

But...is it my best Colnago???

"The best?" you question. Let me explain:

1- The ride qualities are typical Colnago; very predictable down hill and through the bends and corners, reasonably (forgiving) light up hill, stable at high speed and with a geometry that fits my body without having to look for components with unusual sizes. This frame's seat tube is 62cm c to c which is really too tall for me but I can ride it quite comfortably. I have got the Campy Daytona steel seatpost buried right down in the frame to suit me and it does look very old school.

2- The purchase price. Gee it was cheap. I won't tell you it's price but it was really cheap. It was completely filthy with a quite damaged paint job. The bar tape was just awful and tatty but underneath it looked OK. It had a Suntour Superbe Pro groupset in what looked to be good condition and it had a Concor saddle with a little life left in it.

The Suntour Superbe Pro didn't put me off - It could be changed to a slightly tired Campy C-Record (3rd gen.) gruppo I had doing nothing. Haha sorry 10 speedsemiracer.

3- It's a bike you can just jump on and ride anywhere. I don't have to worry about where I lean it or if it does get a bit dirty. I have ridden it quite a bit as it was my 'go to' bike for quite a while even though the stand-over height is a little close for comfort, haha. The Campy groupset is a bit old and tired but it still works but not as good as it used to (just like me).

After a strip, clean, re-grease and a paint touch-up here and there it started to look a bit presentable. In it's past it was a team bike for a Belgian team which I haven't been able to identify, thus the 'unusual' paint scheme. (Isn't purple, green and white the womens movement colours? - a bike with a conscience.) Then it looks like it had a hard life and probably ending up as a training bike.

Its a Colnago Super frame built with the good old Columbus SL tubing. I estimate it was built around 1988. And, yes, I like it. It puts a smile on my face.

Important Footnote: As you may read on Page 7, Alex Thanks Alex) positively identified the Belgian team as being the 'Collstrop - Isoglass' team. This team, using this coloured frame only existed in 1991 so I'm assuming the frame is a 1991 Colnago Super.

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Is it my best Colnago? Well, it's fun to ride and still does everything I want it to do. I like it and it has a place in my heart.
Last edited by GaryF on Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:20 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:29 pm

Nooo! Superbe Pro down to Campy? (Aneurysm in progress)

And by the way, the 1980s just called, they want their paint job back.

Seriously though, that is a properly nice bike.

Isn't it funny the compromises we make for bikes we like i.e. too big/too small/too many.

I have a Shogun which is one size too small (don't care), a Raleigh which I don't need (also don't care) and a Peugeot which I also don't need and have modded to Shimano 105 9sp with brifters but is one size too large (this is a bigger issue due to all of my prior sports-related injuries finally catching up with me last year, so am selling).

must admit to a bit of envy re your fleet. A couple of yours have me drooling, the SunTour Pinarello, the ALAN, the VS and the Rossin Prestige with the Shamals are my faves, but the entire bunch are just beautiful and finished to such a high standard, yet are all completely usable.

Congratulations GaryF,
(your Insurance broker must love you btw).
Mmm, SunTour

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:44 pm

10speedsemiracer you always have me chuckling to myself. Yes, you're absolutely right; we do make compromises for things that we probably shouldn't. And, that paint job crack....hahaha, very funny.

Insurance - there's nothing quite like a baseball bat and a hungry, nasty Bull Arab just waiting for its next plaything.

Those 4 bikes you single out are special in their own way, I sometimes get a bike off the garage wall and have it sitting in the loungeroom as I watch TV. Just looking and admiring it. You guys know what I mean - I'm not the only 'strange' one here - haha. Each bike is unique and evokes special memories. Those 4 are no exceptions. One day, when I'm well and truely gone, I hope they create pleasant memories for someone else.

Now I'm getting close to the end ( haha, I'm not really that old), I wonder which bike will be my last bike. This question really has me perplexed. Usually the answer in the blue Cinelli Supercorsa but it does change regularly.

re fleet envy, I remember visiting people like Warren, Addo, David, etc, and being very envious indeed. All great guys with some spectacular bikes. If they could be bothered to post photos of their collections....well, now then you would be absolutely blown away.

Then again, I have visited collectors with one or two bikes that have been absolute gems and some of my most memorable visits have been to old bike riders who have shown me their old racing bike with all their history together. Now that I most envy.
Last edited by GaryF on Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:54 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:20 am

Look! ....Up on that bike! .....Is it GREEN?.....Is it BLUE?.....NO.....It's CELESTE.

Yes, thats right, it's a Bianchi.

Allow me guide you through the identity and features of this Celeste Bianchi:

Bianchi Campione del Mondo 12v

1982 Columbus Tretubi frame from the Piaggio era as used by the Belgian Bianchi team. The Campione del Mondo components, as listed in the 1982 Bianchi catalogue, have been upgraded to a complete 1982 Campagnolo Nuovo Record gruppo featuring an engraved and milled seat post and large ring as well as the Campagnolo Portacatena shifting system. Bottom bracket bearings and axle as well as the headset have also been upgraded to Record/Nuovo Record. Campagnolo pedals are Superleggeri with Christophe steel toe clips and Cinelli laminated straps. Pantographed Ambrosio stem and bars with leather Ambrosio 'Bike Line' bar covering. The saddle is a celeste coloured Rolls. Cobra bidon cage and Mariplast Bianchi bottle and a celeste colours Silca frame pump feature as accessories. Wheels have Campagnolo Record hubs and now fitted with Mavic MA10 rims. Black brake cable casings with the top tube brake cable guides being repainted black round out the specifications.

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I bought this frame in the 90's and repaired the many paint chips before setting out to build it up to it's finished state as shown below. The frame was quite chipped especially around the rear triangles. I discovered the celeste colour could be made up by mixing a light blue with a grass green. About 50/50 for each colour. Once the colour is correct it needed to be toned right down. I did this by carefully adding white to the colour. A little at a time until I had what turned out to be a perfect match. I filled the pit/chip holes and painted the affected areas with an airbrush.

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Fitting a Portacatena system reduces the rear gear cluster fitment space and requires going from a 6 cog freewheel to s 5 cog allowing the chain to derail onto the rear RH side dropout attachment as seen in this photograph. You can see the Campagnolo pre-drilled and tapped the RH dropout to accommodate the derailing attachment. The 1982 Nuovo Record rear derailleur has been highlighted with celeste green to match the frame. Notice the black plastic sleeve around the derailleur adjusting screw to minimise personal injury in the event of a crash.

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I milled the 6 flutes into a two bolt Nuovo Record seatpost as well as engraving the Bianchi "B" into the seatpost - clever dick aren't I? haha. Saddle is a celeste coloured Stelle San Marco 'Rolls' The Rolls line of saddles was introduced in 1983 - a year after this frame was made.

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The 'big ring' has been pantographed with the letter 'B'. Originally this ring came off a Benotto bicycle but the "B" really does fit well with the Bianchi brand and definitely looks at home on the bike. Other features visible in this photograph is a Nuovo record clamp-on front derailleur, Superleggeri pedals with Christophe toe clips and Cinelli laminated straps and a Nuovo Record crankset and Record bottom bracket.

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The Campagnolo Super Record brake levers have been highlighted with the celeste colour and fitted with later model Campagnolo gum hoods with the 'shield' logo. The bar wrap is by Ambrosio - Bike Line and is black leather. It has been made to accommodate the bend of the bars and the fitment of the brake levers. It attaches with a black zipper that runs the length of the wrap.

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The bike features a Campagnolo Portacatena chain derailing system and the 'trigger' mechanism can be seen attached to the RH gear lever. Notice the original Campagnolo decal from the 1950's era near the gear levers. The Ambrosio stem is pantographed and red filled to match the frame decals. The headset is a steel Campagnolo Nuovo Record item. I have painted the top tube brake cable guides black similar to the more upmarket Bianchi frames of the era.

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Above: CdM with some of his mates: 82 Bianchi Campione del Mondo; 85 Cinelli Supercorsa; 90 Rossin Prestige; 83 ALAN Sprint; circa 87 Pinarello Asolo.


The Campione del Mondo's were not built in Bianchi's 'Reparto Corse' (Race Department) like the Superleggera's but they were a pretty honest racing bike.

The 12v indicated it is a 12 speed - still pretty flash for 1982 - but I have fitted it with Campagnolo's Portacatena derailling system as this frame had the 2 holes drilled in the Campagnolo RH rear dropout for the derailling system. This was 'the next big thing' introduced by Campagnolo in 1978. It didn't set the racing world on fire. But, it's Campagnolo so it must be good - I had to have one!

Basically, you're in a race. You get a flat rear tyre. To assist the race mechanic to change the back wheel, you depress the little trigger attached to the RH gear lever as you pull back the lever. This action takes you past the usual stop for that lever and allows the rear derailleur and chain to now derail onto the "C" fixture attached to the RH rear dropout. The mechanic now has the chain 'parked' out of the way and the back wheel can be swapped over much more easily.

After the wheel change you re-mount the bike and the mechanic gives you a push off. As he is doing this, you derail the chain back onto your selected cog on the freewheel by pushing on the RH gear lever. Simple.

Oh yes, I know what you're thinking. Does it work? Well, yes it does. Forget about the extra cog you went without just to attach this system - you're strong, you probably didn't need that gear (or two) anyway.

How does it ride? It's a pretty well sorted out frame and as such rides very nicely. It has nice road manners and handles road conditions with ease.

****** A little trivia mainly for myself - haha: My very first post within this forum in 2006 was about the identity of this bike. My knowledge of this bike has now progressed significantly.******
Last edited by GaryF on Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:35 am, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby Lots of steel bikes » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:38 am

GaryF wrote:Look! ....Up on that bike! .....Is it GREEN?.....Is it BLUE?.....NO.....It's CELESTE.

Yes, thats right, it's a Bianchi.

Image

Above: With some of his mates: 82 Bianchi Campione del Mondo; 85 Cinelli Supercorsa; 90 Rossin Prestige; 83 ALAN Sprint; circa 87 Pinarello Asolo.


Great bike great write up GaryF,
Here’s a similarly posed photo of my Italians with the Bianchi also taking pride of place.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:03 pm

Hi "Lots". Now let me get this straight: Bianchi, Pinarello, Colnago, Moser, Tommasini and Daccordi. And they're all my size too.

What a great photo. What magnificent bikes from my favourite era.

I searched everywhere for a Bianchi like yours for many years but no luck. Yours looks to be built with very nice tubing and constructed at Bianchi's Reparto Corse. I understand Bianchi's were imported into Australia in the 90's by a grandson of Eduardo Bianchi who happened to live in Brisbane as I recall. Unfortunately orders from bikeshops to the importer were a little unorganised with the result that imports ceased until a new importer came onto the scene a number of years later.

I particularly like the iridescent celeste paint scheme but those bikes with the uni-crown left me cold (not like yours). Yours is a dream machine.

If I can skip over the next four bikes, I am very interested in your Daccordi. being at the end of your line-up it is hard for my tired old eyes to see. If possible, could you expand on this snapshot and tell me more about it.

I know I have passed 4 other mouth-watering machines but i'm sure they will get their time in the sun at some stage.

All beautiful - a very impressive collection indeed.
Last edited by GaryF on Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:01 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby Lots of steel bikes » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:20 pm

GaryF wrote:Hi "Lots". Now let me get this straight: Bianchi, Pinarello, Colnago, Moser, Tommasini and Daccordi. And they're all my size too.

What a great photo. What magnificent bikes from my favourite era.

I searched everywhere for a Bianchi like yours for many years but no luck. Yours looks to be built with very nice tubing and constructed at Bianchi's Reparto Corse. I understand Bianchi's were imported into Australia in the 90's by a grandson of Eduardo Bianchi who happened to live in Brisbane as I recall. Unfortunately orders from bikeshops to the importer were a little unorganised with the result that imports ceased until a new importer came onto the scene a number of years later.

I particularly likes the iridescent celeste paint scheme but those bikes with the uni-crown left me cold (not like yours). Yours is a dream machine.

If I can skip over the next four bikes, I an very interested in your Daccordi. being at the end of your line-up it is hard for my tired old eyes to see. If possible, could you expand on this snapshot and tell me more about it.

I know I have passed 4 other mouth-watering machines but i'm sure they will get their time in the sun at some stage.

All beautiful - a very impressive collection indeed.

Thanks for that.
The bikes range from 58 - 60cm seat tube.
The Tommasini is the odd one out at 54cm.
The Bianchi tubing is TSX Ultralight. The fork isn’t original but I think it suits the frame very well and I like chrome. The more the better.
It was the first bike I built from a frame.
Bought it from a guy in Victoria. In my eagerness to get it built I used a mix of parts I just happened to have at the time and it ended up being such a tight and super quiet ride that I never changed it.
The Daccordi is somewhat of a sorry tale.
I found it at a tip shop. Someone had ground off the top tube cable guides and had also ground a chamfer on the crank arms! It’s a mix of Campagnolo (Victory derailleurs and shifters), Shimano and Stronglight. The gold coloured headset is a nice touch.
Not a high end frame. 501 tubing with a 27.2 seat tube diameter.
Measures 60 ST 58 TT.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sun Jan 21, 2018 4:32 pm

Both are interesting stories. I think the Bianchi build tells an important story. You don't need every little component to be matching to have a bike perform beautifully. Really, this is an 'old time' way to fit out a bike. As long as things work, thats the important thing. I think the front fork looks perfect for that frame too. It really is a top class frame.

What a shame about the Daccordi having bits cut off it. It does have a very 'classy' head set and it goes to boot! Everything works. I had a Daccordi once and I always look for another frame to replace it. I have special requirements though. It has to be late 70's or perhaps early 80's with on the top gear cable guides, built from Columbus SL (SLX would be OK), 58/59 C to C seat tube and red in colour (but that's negotiable).

The Tommasini is small but it's still a Tommasini.

Thanks very much for showing these great bikes to me.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby Lots of steel bikes » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:10 pm

GaryF wrote:Thanks very much for showing these great bikes to me.

Always a pleasure to share a common interest.

While I was typing the info on the Daccordi it struck me that something was strange. Why would an Italian made Daccordi use Reynolds 501? Also, I don’t think 501 would have a 27.2 seat post.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:10 pm

Italian builders did use Reynolds tubes but I would suspect Daccordi would predominantly use Columbus tubes for this era of bike. Then, thanks to your fine investigative work, a 'cover-up' has been exposed. It looks like the frame material is Columbus SL. Good, old, reliable SL.

Brilliant Holmes..err...ah.er should I say, Lots of Steel Bikes.


If you ever decide to rejuvenate this frame, top tube brake cable guides are really easy to replace - but you already knew this.

With the two sets of brazed in bidon mounts plus the pump peg, I would estimate this frame to be late 80's.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby ironhanglider » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:32 pm

GaryF wrote:Look! ....Up on that bike! .....Is it GREEN?.....Is it BLUE?.....NO.....It's CELESTE.

Yes, thats right, it's a Bianchi.

Allow me guide you through the identity and features of this Celeste Bianchi:


Fitting a Portacatena system reduces the rear gear cluster fitment space and requires going from a 6 cog freewheel to s 5 cog allowing the chain to derail onto the rear RH side dropout attachment as seen in this photograph. You can see the Campagnolo pre-drilled and tapped the RH dropout to accommodate the derailing attachment. The 1982 Nuovo Record rear derailleur has been highlighted with celeste green to match the frame. Notice the black plastic sleeve around the derailleur adjusting screw to minimise personal injury in the event of a crash.


The bike features a Campagnolo Portacatena chain derailing system and the 'trigger' mechanism can be seen attached to the RH gear lever. Notice the original Campagnolo decal from the 1950's era near the gear levers. The Ambrosio stem is pantographed and red filled to match the frame decals. The headset is a steel Campagnolo Nuovo Record item. I have painted the top tube brake cable guides black similar to the more upmarket Bianchi frames of the era.

Image


The 12v indicated it is a 12 speed - still pretty flash for 1982 - but I have fitted it with Campagnolo's Portacatena derailling system as this frame had the 2 holes drilled in the Campagnolo RH rear dropout for the derailling system. This was 'the next big thing' introduced by Campagnolo in 1978. It didn't set the racing world on fire. But, it's Campagnolo so it must be good - I had to have one!

Basically, you're in a race. You get a flat rear tyre. To assist the race mechanic to change the back wheel, you depress the little trigger attached to the RH gear lever as you pull back the lever. This action takes you past the usual stop for that lever and allows the rear derailleur and chain to now derail onto the "C" fixture attached to the RH rear dropout. The mechanic now has the chain 'parked' out of the way and the back wheel can be swapped over much more easily.

After the wheel change you re-mount the bike and the mechanic gives you a push off. As he is doing this, you derail the chain back onto your selected cog on the freewheel by pushing on the RH gear lever. Simple.

Oh yes, I know what you're thinking. Does it work? Well, yes it does. Forget about the extra cog you went without just to attach this system - you're strong, you probably didn't need that gear (or two) anyway.

How does it ride? It's a pretty well sorted out frame and as such rides very nicely. It has nice road manners and handles road conditions with ease.


I may have a solution... A Suntour 'Perfect' 6spd cluster, that has the spacing for 7spd, meaning it is a bit narrower than a regular 6. PM me if you would like it.

Cheers,

Cameron
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:54 pm

You're perfectly right Cameron but i'm worried about your Forum name: ironhanglider!!! That did bring a big smirk to my face. I can just imagine the consequences of an iron hang glider. It just goes to show just how mundane I must be with an unimaginative GaryF as my Forum name.

Anyway....you do have the answer to restoring the 12 speeds and still use the Portacatena. Great lateral thinking.

Thanks for the offer too. Very generous of you. Where I live is quite flat and the cycling I do now is just a relaxed ride until I get tired of it so my 5 speed block is quite enough.

Thanks so much,

Gary.

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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Fri Jan 26, 2018 3:44 pm

It's Australia Day! Happy Australia Day guys.

What better day to conclude my 'showing off' thread by posting my (almost) last bike. An Italian bike on Australia day. I could possibly defend this cross-nationality decision by dedicating this post to the many, many Italian migrants from the 50's, 60's and 70's who have contributed so very much to our way of life here in Australia. I reckon all of our migrants have made Australia a better place to live.

I just had my DNA analysed and upsettingly I have not one drop of Italian DNA in me. Oh well, my love of Italian bikes hasn't been a life long obsession yet, but it eventually will - one day.

This bike is my favourite - there I said it! It's a 1985 Cinelli Supercorsa in china blue colour. I have had a kind of relationship with this bike ever since it was imported into Australia by Shane DeGrandi for his bikeshop in Geelong. It came in with two other Cinelli Supercorsa's; one white and the other red. I'm pretty sure they were all in my size too.

I was commuting long distances in 1985 and I would very often ride through Geelong in the evening on my way home. More often than not, and after shop hours, I would stop to press my nose up against DeGrandi's window and dream. Then one evening there were the 3 Supercorsa additions positioned at the back of the displayed bikes on the floor of the store. It was love at first sight.

Which was my favourite? Eventually I had my Supercorsa pecking order: Red, then Blue then White. My only problem being a lack of funds. That's why I was riding such long distances daily - no money for a car. Ocean Grove to Broadmeadows - a bike or bike and train excursion daily. Looking back, it was such great fun.

Anyway, over the course of a year all three disappeared from DeGrandi's shop floor. Sold I thought. There goes my dream.

What do you know, about a year and a bit later, the blue Supercorsa frame re-appeared amongst the frames in Degrandi's new store. It WAS NOT going to get away again!!! By 'hook of crook' I was going to buy it. And.....I DID buy it.

I had never talked to Shane about the 3 Cinelli's he imported as they were beyond my means. But, on this occasion, I discussed the Cinelli's. To my surprise, Shane told me that the store had a break-in and the red Supercorsa was stolen. So, somewhere out there is a 1985, 58 1/2cm 'ish' red Cinelli Supercorsa that is still missed by me and most probably Shane.

Oh yeah, the blue frame had had two owners in that short space of time but it was never built-up. It was 'new' for all intents and purposes. I consider myself it's first real owner.

The frame: A 1985 Cinelli Supercorsa built with thicker walled Columbus SPX tubing for strength. the seat tube is 585mm c to c while the top tube is 575mm c to c. The seat tube angle is 74 degrees while the head tube angle is 75 1/2 degrees - In my book, and considering the tubing and geometry, I suggest this frame is pure criterium. I commuted on this bike off and on for about three years and it takes concentration to keep it from wandering off a straight line.

I wanted to build it up with the best of everything available (to me) in 1985 and that, of course means Campagnolo; no if's or but's!!! After all it's the best (mass built) frame Italy can produce. (I suppose that little statement could cause quite an argument from all sorts of idealogical viewpoints, haha.) I managed to put together a complete 1985 Super Record groupset. This featured a factory polished seatpost, and last gen. etched logo cranks with 53/42 rings. The pedals and bottom bracket are both Campagnolo Super Record titanium offerings - the BB being the stronger 2nd gen. item. I changed the brake callipers to Campy Cobalto's as the blue stone matches the china blue of the frame with Super record levers and Campy Victory'Triumphe grey hoods. The wheels are built 28 hole high flanged Record hubs and blue anodised Galli rims. The Campy gear levers have been enhanced by the Swiss ICS company being hollowed out and rubber filled, curved and chromed. All other gruppo items are Super Record. I did change many of the original Campagnolo bolts with an aftermarket OMAS titanium bolt set.

I fitted a 6 speed Zeus 2000 titanium 'corn cob' freewheel as they were beautifully built and super light weight, although they tended to be a little soft and wore easily. Mine is in very good nick as I retro fitted it after I stopped commuting on the bike. (The Zeus freewheel is another little gem I discovered in Hillman's bikeshop.)

The suede leather wrapped Cinelli Giro d'Italia bars and 110cm Cinelli 1R stem were bought as an item as they needed to be assembled at the Cinelli factory. This bar/stem combination forms part of the famous Cinelli 'VIP' set. I was fortunate enough to be able to assemble a complete Cinelli 'VIP' set in a light charcoal colour. Along with the bars and stem this 'VIP' set consists of the suede unicanitor saddle along with a Cinelli replacement alloy, socket headed seat post bolt. This bolt replaces the Campagnolo bolt on their Super Record seatpost. The Unicanitor saddle has a much thicker (ovalised vertically) alloy frame and needs a longer bolt fitted to the seatpost to allow the seatpost clamp to actually hold the saddle. In the set you also find a suede tubular tyre pouch for strapping under the saddle and a zip-up suede bidon cover to help insulate your bidon. Rounding off the 'VIP' set is a pair of non-suede laminated toe straps and the Cinelli alloy toe clips. Personally I wish my 'VIP' set was in a white colour but beggars cant be choosers, the light charcoal set is really nice to have. I have never actually seen a complete Cinelli 'VIP' set on any bike, either in person or in a photograph. I'm sure they're out there but I feel it might be quite rare.

The pump is an older model Silca with the flat topped handle in white and fitted with a Campagnolo pump head and held in place with a campy pump 'umbrella'. Last but not least, the bidon is a period correct 'Cinelli' screenprinted item. It is held in place on the bike by an iconic alloy TA biddon cage with a black plastic top.

All up, as you see it, it weighs a very respectable 21 1/2 lbs.

Oh yes, the actual bike:

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Last edited by GaryF on Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:31 pm, edited 14 times in total.

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GaryF
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:04 pm

Anyone still reading this stuff?

That's basically the extent of my not so grand collection of bikes.

I do have a couple of others, one being my wife's, uncle's Malvern Star he bought new in 1938 for his job as a PMG telegram boy. Mine only in care until another member of the family steps up and want's to care for it.

As I have stated, the Cinelli is my favourite but it is a close thing. Perhaps you will like another one of my bikes best, or perhaps none of then appeal to you.

Thanks for looking.

Gary.

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10speedsemiracer
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:26 pm

I really like the Cinelli. Around the era I love, beautifully kept but not a show pony. And proper pedals as well....my kind of bike. (Imagine how sexy it would be with a SunTour Superbe Pro driveline....only joking, it's awesome).
Mmm, SunTour

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GaryF
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:32 pm

10speedsemiracer wrote:I really like the Cinelli. Around the era I love, beautifully kept but not a show pony. And proper pedals as well....my kind of bike. (Imagine how sexy it would be with a SunTour Superbe Pro driveline....only joking, it's awesome).



Hahaha and thanks 10speedsemiracer. Wouldn't it be scary, funny if you actually converted me to Suntour - i'm probably half way there.

Footnote: re the pedals: They started out as a nice set of Campy Superleggeri pedals but I wanted a Super Record set so I found a pair of titanium axles but could find only one set of the smaller diameter ball bearings and races stripped from a single Super Record Pedal. I stripped my pedals down and pressed the races out of the inner position. I retained the original races and balls from the original pedals for the outer position. Bolted it all together and bingo - a set of titanium spindled Campy pedals - sounds simple but pressing the cups out is - well - challenging.
Last edited by GaryF on Fri Jan 26, 2018 5:50 pm, edited 6 times in total.

Lots of steel bikes
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby Lots of steel bikes » Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:38 pm

GaryF wrote:Anyone still reading this stuff?
Gary.

Absolutely still reading. I’ve just reread the lot. Thanks very much for the time you have taken in presenting your collection.
My favourite is the Vern Smith. Understated elegance.

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GaryF
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:49 pm

Lots of steel bikes wrote:
GaryF wrote:Anyone still reading this stuff?
Gary.

Absolutely still reading. I’ve just reread the lot. Thanks very much for the time you have taken in presenting your collection.
My favourite is the Vern Smith. Understated elegance.


Thanks for your support Lots of Steel (and everything else) Bikes, much appreciated. I'm now really enjoying your posts and I have re-read them all a few times too.

Re the Vern Smith - when I sold off half the fleet, I decided to keep the Vern Smith as the Columbus Max frame really had me at 'hello'. I sold off some really iconic bikes that did cast a shadow over anything I now have. Says something about the Vern Smith. I think the complete Vern Smith cost me $200 - $300 - my 3rd cheapest bike of all the bikes I have shown. It's also very nice to ride too although I do worry about the wheel strength underneath my substantial weight - all muscle of course, haha.

LG
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby LG » Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:25 pm

I'm not bored yet either, well done with the presentation.
LG = Low Gear

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GaryF
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby GaryF » Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:54 pm

LG wrote:I'm not bored yet either, well done with the presentation.


Thanks very much LG. I started out just replacing a few photos and it grew. It was fun to do a little bit at a time. To be perfectly honest, I've been suffering with a few leg problems this past 4 months and I cut down on my work so I had 'idle' hands - a dangerous situation, haha.

I just love seeing what bikes others have and the background stories really are interesting, as you no doubt appreciate too. There are so many guys (girls too) associated with this forum that have great knowledge, passion and enthusiasm as well as a willingness to help others if possible.

Your support is quite valued,

Gary.

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P!N20
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Re: My Bikes - Re-Posting a few photos.

Postby P!N20 » Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:44 pm

Phwoar, that Cinelli. Talk about saving the best til last!

Talk to me about those ICS levers - were they a special order thing or did they just show up at your LBS?

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