Repco Appreciation Society

Vintage, yesteryear and retro biking

Postby 531db » Wed Jul 02, 2008 4:27 pm

kukamunga wrote:I've heard of Large and XLarge sizes..... but Giant ? :roll:


Built by the Giant Bicycle Corporation.

'535' is just a fancy name for Giant's inhouse 4130 chrome moly double butted tubing. A name similar to '531', but meaningless really.
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by BNA » Wed Jul 02, 2008 10:19 pm

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Postby LuckyPierre » Wed Jul 02, 2008 10:19 pm

It isn't a Superlite, but I've got a Centurion Signet frame and fork that's about that size (seat tube 48cm centre-centre and top tube 50cm centre to centre).
Image
The frame is in pretty good nick (maybe even really good). It's got quite long chain stays, so it's more relaxed frame than a Superlite. And it uses a very basic method of attaching the rear derailleur (which might limit the derailleurs you could use. But - it's Tange Prestige double butted tubing and is about the same weight as a Superlite.
Actually, I've also got a 56cm x 55 cm (seat tube x top tube) Superlite frame and fork. It's a bit scruffier and 4130 CroMo tubing.
They're barely worth shipping up, but if you can't find anything ...
Litespeed Classic - 3Al/2.5V titanium tube set, Record 9-speed groupset, Open Corsa Evo CX
Alchemy Diablo - Columbus Zonal tubing, Ultegra 9-speed groupset, UltraGatorskins
Gitane Rocks T1 - U6 tubing, Deore/XT groupset, CrossMarks
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Postby sunshinecoast_rider » Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:08 am

LuckyPierre PM sent
Cheers

Ritchie
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Postby munga » Sun Jul 06, 2008 7:18 am

I bought a Europa for $20 yesterday (I'ts a repco under the skin guys) [Edit: no it isn't, its a tecnotrat oria frame]. Photos to come. It's shabby, with some serious rust on the top tube, so I don't know if its salvageable yet..
Stronglight cranks and headset are definitely keepers, as with the CLB brakeset and french bars.
Shifters are Shimano Exage sport. No wheels. Nice little Sugino seatpost binder bolt, and nondescript fluted post might be worth recycling.
I will get the frame cleaned up and go from there.
Anyone seen stickers/decals available for Europa's?
Last edited by munga on Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby MountGower » Sun Jul 06, 2008 9:26 am

Is this from Ipswich, Munga?
Also, Europa is still a going concern. Even if period decals are not available, something you at least didn't have to have made should be. Just get it powder coated and tell people it's a Superlite. Who cares?
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Postby munga » Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:17 am

MG: yes, this is the one from Ipswich.

Image

Maybe I can use some Septone Rust Converter and ride her as is?
Image

Nice looking calipers, levers:
Image
Image

Chrome fork has some marring, but doesn't it look nice with my mavic hub:
Image

Stronglight 300LX cranks with Shimano 53/42 chainrings, Exage Sport derailleurs:
Image
I like the pulley cage plates:
Image

[Edit: According to http://www.vintagetrek.com/component_dates.htm#shimano the bike is likely to be 1988 vintage. 26.8 seatpost has MADE IN FRANCE and 04-88 stamped on it also.]
Last edited by munga on Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby kukamunga » Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:33 am

Some nice parts there. Forks are very nice. Hope the frame comes up well. There are quite a few similarities with a couple of my Repco/Malvern Star frames
God save the ABC & SBS.....
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Postby munga » Mon Jul 07, 2008 6:30 pm

Hmm, it's not a Repco in drag after all. I emailed John Abeni and he says it's one of their 1988 Technotrat frames, so I'll copy my original post over to http://bicycles.net.au/forums/viewtopic.php?=&p=7052 , where it might serve a better purpose to other Europisti 8)
So now I have the onerous task of refurbing the frame and getting it back on the road. I have some old NOS Arabesque stuff, so maybe I can just throw that on? Not exactly the same era, but it should look nice enough with the new stickers:
Image
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Postby Paul S » Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:06 pm

A bike that is very similar to the Repco Superlite is the Kojima Eagle.

My late 80's Eagle has a lugged Tange Cro-Mo frame, 700c quick release wheelset and a Shimano Exage (biopace) groupset. In all respects it seems very much like my friend's Superlite of the same vintage. It is also about the same weight.

I haven't been able to find out very much about the Kojima brand. I understand Kojima sold at least one other model, called the Condor. I'd be grateful if anyone could provide me with more info.

I'm very fond of Repco bikes. My first real road bike was a Repco Monaco. I really wanted a Superlite - but, as a poor starving student, I couldn't afford one.

I also recently rebuilt a Repco Traveller - in all its 27" chromed steel glory - as a single speed. The Traveller received new paint, bearings, spokes, chain and (single) rear sprocket. I also filed off the braze-ons, 'chopped & flopped' the 'bars and gave it a very aggressive polishing. It now has a dead straight chain-line, rides very well and looks great. The shiny bits are very shiny.

I think its unfair for people to dismiss Repco bikes as 'low end' - even the Traveller. The Traveller was a very good quality and well specified bike for its price. Nowadays there are no longer any affordable road bikes on the Australian market.

It's remarkable to see how many Repcos are still plying the roads - particularly the Travellers. It's a tribute to how well the bikes were built, to how well-liked the bikes still are, and (of course) to the people who maintain and rebuild them.
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Postby r2160 » Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:28 pm

Here you go guys, my Superlite. Photobucket tells me they are small enough, so I hope they are OK.

I thought about upgrading the gear/brake/rims, but I actually like the fact that she is all original, so I might just shout myself a new bike :-)

Image
Image
Image
cheers
Glenn
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Postby HappyHumber » Wed Jul 09, 2008 12:33 am

Paul S wrote:A bike that is very similar to the Repco Superlite is the Kojima Eagle.


I wonder... is it a coincidence that the Indi Series of road bikes bought into Australia in the 80s (and made by Kuwahara) also had their line of bikes named after birds? I've seen Indi 500 Falcons, Eagles and was recently given a very original one owner Indi Hawk... The arabesque Shimano 600 groupset dates it to the early to mid 80s. :?
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Postby MountGower » Wed Jul 09, 2008 6:35 am

Glenn

Thanks for getting this sullied thread back on track with the pics of your Superlite. Man, that thing is in fine condition. Certainly, I would not be replacing it. Being in such good nick it's hard to throw the old stuff out. It's a case of weight and function, I suppose, but a very tough decision.

Great to see such an example.
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Postby r2160 » Wed Jul 09, 2008 8:23 am

The one thing I have discovered trying to save money on fuel getting to and from work, is that I really like riding my bike. I have cut my fuel bill around $60 a week, because I have started riding wherever I need to go rather than drive.

The superlite goes really well, I guess I just thought about shouting myself a new toy.

:-)

glenn
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Postby vitualis » Tue Jul 29, 2008 8:09 pm

I just won a Repco Superlight on eBay! :D

I'm thinking of using it to teach myself some basic bike mechanical skills and converting it to a single speed bike.

Pictures to come once I've picked it up...

Cheers.
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2009 Pegoretti Responsorium Ciavete Custom :: 1982/3 Colnago Super :: 2006 Cannondale Six13 Pro :: Late 1980s Repco Superlite
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Repco traveller

Postby westernrun » Sat Aug 02, 2008 1:10 pm

I have just been given a Repco traveller by my father in law. It has no gears or pedals. The Shimano brakes are a bit rusty-and I am wondering whether it is worth rennovating it for my commute to work. Any suggestions for suitable gears, pedals etc...I really don't know much of the technical side of things as you might tell! I am hoping that I can converted it into my commuting bike for a cost that is much less than a new bike...? :roll:
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Postby munga » Sun Aug 03, 2008 2:33 pm

You could probably get away with new brake pads, cables, pedals and a chain. Local bike shop, $50-$100
pitty43 wrote:Thanks all for your help. Better change my Gumtree add now.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/retroclassiccycling/
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Postby lisanne » Sun Aug 03, 2008 5:43 pm

I should put my shopper up in here, I finished it a week or so ago...

Here is what it looked like originally - the owner before me did a really good job in cleaning it up with WD40 and foil, but the bike was too small for her!

Image

Image

Image

Image


And here is the finished product:

http://www.imagesbylisa.com.au/gallery/ShopperBike/

Image

The mud guards were really quite rusty, but I soaked them in the bath tub with oxalic acid - no scrubbing required

Image


Image


Image

The pannier rack was also really rusty, but again a soak in a bucket with oxalic acid - came up very very well!

Image


Image
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trying to find a wheel

Postby wheelless » Sun Aug 03, 2008 6:16 pm

I have an old red Repco that I love. It needs a new front wheel (26" x 1 3/8", but not the ubiquitous mountain bike 26" x 1 3/8"). Although they replaced the tires a couple of months ago, my local old Repco friendly bike shop are having trouble laying their hands on a wheel. They said they might be able to build one eventually when they can get hold of the parts, but this sounds like it could take months.

They've suggested pinching a wheel off another old bike, but I don't have a car to get to the places where I might find one. (Public transport in Canberra is, hmmmm, not great.) And I'm not sure I could discern what would be the right size or worth salvaging. I've searched on the web thinking I'd be able to buy one online but have come up goose eggs. Any suggestions?
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Re: trying to find a wheel

Postby il padrone » Sun Aug 03, 2008 6:52 pm

wheelless wrote:I have an old red Repco that I love. It needs a new front wheel (26" x 1 3/8", but not the ubiquitous mountain bike 26" x 1 3/8")...
...searched on the web thinking I'd be able to buy one online but have come up goose eggs. Any suggestions?

This is the old 26" size that was common on kids bikes in the 60s and 70s before MTBs came along. So you could check out the hard rubbish left out for council pickup (do they do this in Canberra?) Look for standard girls bikes, 26" and no knobby tyres. Rims may be available from Harris Cyclery on-line, but they doi not ship rims, and most do not - the freight cost is prohibitive.

If you get down to Melbourne you could try Bicycle Recycle, in South Rd, Moorabin. They will probably not send stuff out, but could tell you if they have some 26" rims or wheels on hand.
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Postby vx255 » Sun Aug 03, 2008 8:17 pm

lisanne wrote:I should put my shopper up in here, I finished it a week or so ago...
Snipped images


That came up really well Lisa, Thanks for the heads up on the Oxalic acid too btw :D
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Postby kukamunga » Mon Aug 04, 2008 8:42 am

Ahh.... fluoro paint jobs. Beware of that nasty ultra-violet sunlight. Ride at night only, or it'll end up looking like :-
Image
:shock:
God save the ABC & SBS.....
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Postby triode12 » Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:18 pm

r2160 wrote:Here you go guys, my Superlite. Photobucket tells me they are small enough, so I hope they are OK.

I thought about upgrading the gear/brake/rims, but I actually like the fact that she is all original, so I might just shout myself a new bike :-)

Image
Image
Image
cheers
Glenn


I have a superlite of similar vintage...how did you find out that your's was made in 1990?

Is it stamped somewhere on the bike?
Live to ride another day.

Why take unnecessary risks? No matter how small they are...
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Postby kukamunga » Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:39 pm

triode12 wrote:Is it stamped somewhere on the bike?

If components are original (and Shimano), you can check out the Shimano date codes for an idea of what year your bike is.....
God save the ABC & SBS.....
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Re: trying to find a wheel

Postby m@ » Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:51 pm

wheelless wrote:I have an old red Repco that I love. It needs a new front wheel (26" x 1 3/8", but not the ubiquitous mountain bike 26" x 1 3/8"). Although they replaced the tires a couple of months ago, my local old Repco friendly bike shop are having trouble laying their hands on a wheel. They said they might be able to build one eventually when they can get hold of the parts, but this sounds like it could take months.

They've suggested pinching a wheel off another old bike, but I don't have a car to get to the places where I might find one. (Public transport in Canberra is, hmmmm, not great.) And I'm not sure I could discern what would be the right size or worth salvaging. I've searched on the web thinking I'd be able to buy one online but have come up goose eggs. Any suggestions?


Get a mate to give you a lift to the tip shops at Mugga Lane and Mitchell, they're veritable treasure troves for old bike parts!
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Postby triode12 » Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:53 pm

kukamunga wrote:
triode12 wrote:Is it stamped somewhere on the bike?

If components are original (and Shimano), you can check out the Shimano date codes for an idea of what year your bike is.....


Thanks Kukamunga,

That was very helpful. Now to check the date codes. :)
The components on my superlite are original.
Live to ride another day.

Why take unnecessary risks? No matter how small they are...
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