cog on freewheel side

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cog on freewheel side

Postby jwg » Tue Sep 07, 2010 8:00 pm

So the wheel i am using now has a cog and lock ring on the cog and lock ring fixed side... all quite normal
on the threaded freewheel side i have another fixed cog threaded on (yeah i know) from my very very newbie days where i didnt ride with toe clips and there was no danger on it coming off as there would be no backwards pressure... so, i was just trying to get the sucker off when i thought i might try a bottom bracket lock ring on her and it threaded on. so ive tightened it all up now and it seems like a fantastic idea.. am i wrong? and is this original?
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by BNA » Tue Sep 07, 2010 8:17 pm

BNA
 

Re: cog on freewheel side

Postby rkelsen » Tue Sep 07, 2010 8:17 pm

No, although some would argue this.

No. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html: "You can use an old lock ring from a British-threaded bottom bracket as an additional safety measure, it is the same thread."
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Re: cog on freewheel side

Postby jwg » Tue Sep 07, 2010 8:35 pm

rkelsen wrote:No, although some would argue this.

No. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html: "You can use an old lock ring from a British-threaded bottom bracket as an additional safety measure, it is the same thread."


ahk sweet, ill give it a go on the road and take some tools with me
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Re: cog on freewheel side

Postby europa » Tue Sep 07, 2010 10:12 pm

It's called a suicide hub. I rode that way for quite a while until I decided I wanted to go fixed properly and bought the proper wheels. It won't cause a problem provided you only apply moderate back pressure ie, slowing down but not skids or panic stops. The locking ring only partly works because it can still be driven off with the cog under back pressure, but it's better than not having anything.

Now the big question - do you actually need a cog on that side at all?
I had a freewheel on my offside for a long time ... and never even used it so I took it off. I've since discovered that this is a common experience.

For what it's worth, my new bike is being ordered with a fixed/fixed hub.

Richard
I had a good bike ... so I fixed it
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Re: cog on freewheel side

Postby jwg » Tue Sep 07, 2010 11:43 pm

europa wrote:It's called a suicide hub. I rode that way for quite a while until I decided I wanted to go fixed properly and bought the proper wheels. It won't cause a problem provided you only apply moderate back pressure ie, slowing down but not skids or panic stops. The locking ring only partly works because it can still be driven off with the cog under back pressure, but it's better than not having anything.

Now the big question - do you actually need a cog on that side at all?
I had a freewheel on my offside for a long time ... and never even used it so I took it off. I've since discovered that this is a common experience.

For what it's worth, my new bike is being ordered with a fixed/fixed hub.

Richard



yeah true.. well i guess i just kind of like the idea of being able to flip the wheel around and using a different gear. also when trying to get it off, it almost became impossible to thread off toward the end
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