Homebuilders.

Recumbents and all feet forward machines

Homebuilders.

Postby nutz4bikez » Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:11 pm

Hey guys :)

Are any of you into building your own recumbents?

I have built a few now and love looking at the work of others so I hope you aren't shy about showing off your work.

I will be posting pics of some of mine as soon as I am allowed to.
User avatar
nutz4bikez
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 5:13 pm
Location: New Zealand

by BNA » Fri Jul 18, 2008 8:02 pm

BNA
 

Postby vic » Fri Jul 18, 2008 8:02 pm

Yes indeed, I'm having a go at my first. A USS LWB made from other bikes. still in the parts accumulating stage. I have made a lowrider/chopper with 4 foot forks. Not sure if that qualifies as a recumbent.. :)
Image
In the process of painting it, but below `15 degrees and high humidity with a spray booth is prolonging the process. It might not be serious, but I'm having fun. Cheers.
User avatar
vic
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:24 pm
Location: Bowning (Yass) NSW

Postby vonhazza » Fri Jul 18, 2008 8:10 pm

Hi welcome to the group,
I haven't done a proper build yet but I have assembled a Cruzbike kit to my own frame and I am planning on doing a welding course soon so I can have a go at building.
I found some interesting build ideas at the Atomic Zombie site.

Regards Steve.
User avatar
vonhazza
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: Hobart

Postby Uba Tracker » Fri Jul 18, 2008 8:56 pm

G'day Steve, forgive me if I come across as a know all, but if you want to invest the time in a welding course try and find one that gives you an intro into brazing. IMHO it is a far better process for bike building than say stick welding (MMAW) as it is rather detailed work and it's very easy to blast a hole through a frame tube with a stick. Plus brazing is more forgiving to repetitive stress than arc welding.

cheers

Harry
A bad day's riding beats a good day's work everytime
User avatar
Uba Tracker
 
Posts: 252
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: Toowoomba, Qld

Postby vonhazza » Fri Jul 18, 2008 9:27 pm

Uba Tracker wrote:G'day Steve, forgive me if I come across as a know all, but if you want to invest the time in a welding course try and find one that gives you an intro into brazing. IMHO it is a far better process for bike building than say stick welding (MMAW) as it is rather detailed work and it's very easy to blast a hole through a frame tube with a stick. Plus brazing is more forgiving to repetitive stress than arc welding.

cheers

Harry


Hi Harry by all means stick your oar in, I read elsewhere in the forum that you have a great deal of experiance in welding and I am happy to receive any advice.

Steve.
User avatar
vonhazza
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: Hobart

Postby vic » Fri Jul 18, 2008 10:22 pm

Seems to me that there is a fair bit of dissension about arc welding. I just want to add that the chopper is stick welded. Solid, and no holes. Equipment cheaper to buy.
User avatar
vic
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:24 pm
Location: Bowning (Yass) NSW

Postby Uba Tracker » Fri Jul 18, 2008 11:03 pm

vic wrote:Seems to me that there is a fair bit of dissension about arc welding. I just want to add that the chopper is stick welded. Solid, and no holes. Equipment cheaper to buy.


Hi Vic, great to hear that your experience with arc welding was a positive one, but you're right I should have balanced my comments by pointing out that arc welding is significantly cheaper in initial set up costs. To qualify what I said earlier it is my experience that arc welding presents more challenges to the inexperienced welder in terms of satisfying results than say the brazing process. No one should be discouraged from expanding their skill base so my apologies to all if I appeared 'anti' arc welding, by all means give it a go. Follow Steve's (Vonhazza) lead and do a welding course, you'll learn accepted practices and hopefully minimise the frustration that results in many a welder gathering dust. :wink:

regards

Harry
A bad day's riding beats a good day's work everytime
User avatar
Uba Tracker
 
Posts: 252
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: Toowoomba, Qld

Postby toolonglegs » Fri Jul 18, 2008 11:26 pm

Quick question on the brazing...I have never built a bicycle and never will.But I am a pretty good welder,mig,tig arc & gas,although I havent touched any welding equipment for nearly 10 years.Would you braze a bicycle frame without the use of lugs?...ie:sticking to tubes together without lugs.Is this strong enough if they are fitted together well enough?.
User avatar
toolonglegs
 
Posts: 14327
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:49 pm
Location: Somewhere with padded walls and really big hills!

Postby John Lewis » Fri Jul 18, 2008 11:34 pm

I'm building number 8 at the moment. Some of them can be seen in the "Show off Your Bent thread on page 2.

All of mine have been filet brazed with Oxy Acetylene except the first which was done with a gas air torch (Not recommended) Working on an Atomic Zombie Delta Wolf now and considering arc welding as that is what has ben done in the plans.

Be warned, building bikes is addictive.

John Lewis
John Lewis
 
Posts: 1167
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:12 pm
Location: Albany. 400km South of Perth

Postby John Lewis » Fri Jul 18, 2008 11:37 pm

toolonglegs wrote:Quick question on the brazing...I have never built a bicycle and never will.But I am a pretty good welder,mig,tig arc & gas,although I havent touched any welding equipment for nearly 10 years.Would you braze a bicycle frame without the use of lugs?...ie:sticking to tubes together without lugs.Is this strong enough if they are fitted together well enough?.


Hi Toolonglegs,

I believe fillet brazing is an acceptable and strong method for building bikes as an alternative to lugs. A lot of bikes have been built that way.

Certainly I have had no problems with the bents I have built and I've never had a welding lesson in my life.

John Lewis
John Lewis
 
Posts: 1167
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:12 pm
Location: Albany. 400km South of Perth

Postby Cyclaholic » Sat Jul 19, 2008 12:01 am

toolonglegs wrote:Quick question on the brazing...I have never built a bicycle and never will.But I am a pretty good welder,mig,tig arc & gas,although I havent touched any welding equipment for nearly 10 years.Would you braze a bicycle frame without the use of lugs?...ie:sticking to tubes together without lugs.Is this strong enough if they are fitted together well enough?.


Personally I think synergic pulse MIG would be a good option for a steel frame, if you have the equipment. I'm thinking about having a crack at a lowracer frame since I have enough bits in the parts bin, and a decent MIG machine.
User avatar
Cyclaholic
 
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 2:43 pm
Location: south west Sydney

Postby Uba Tracker » Sat Jul 19, 2008 12:03 am

toolonglegs wrote:Quick question on the brazing...I have never built a bicycle and never will.But I am a pretty good welder,mig,tig arc & gas,although I havent touched any welding equipment for nearly 10 years.Would you braze a bicycle frame without the use of lugs?...ie:sticking to tubes together without lugs.Is this strong enough if they are fitted together well enough?.

Is it strong enough - yes, but it's a conditional yes. John mentioned fillet brazing, which in essence is controlling the deposition rate of filler rod by the heat input. Too much heat and the brass will 'wick' away from the joint area following the increasing heat in the surrounding frame. Too little heat and the brass wont 'wet' in to the joint giving adequate adhesion. The use of tubular gusseting is widely used particularly where the top tube meets the steerer tube, use that method in any area where you feel a butt joint is inadequate and you'll be right. Lugs are great though, especially in mass production as it allows the entire frame to be loosely assembled before clamping and brazeing.
Toolonglegs you hinted at my all time favourite process, T.I.G. (GTAW) if you are experienced in the art then I would recommend that you forego all other methods and run with that, it is unreservedly the best process. The great thing about T.I.G. welding (for steel frames not alu) is that nowadays it's not much more expensive to set up than arc welding, get yourself a nice little D.C. inverter plus your torch and gas control gear and you could be set up for under $500 AUD which is about half what it was three years ago.

regards

Harry
A bad day's riding beats a good day's work everytime
User avatar
Uba Tracker
 
Posts: 252
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: Toowoomba, Qld

Postby toolonglegs » Sat Jul 19, 2008 12:30 am

Cheers guys,just interested thats all.Although maybee with the amount of frames I go thru it might not be a bad idea!.
User avatar
toolonglegs
 
Posts: 14327
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:49 pm
Location: Somewhere with padded walls and really big hills!

Postby vic » Sat Jul 19, 2008 6:04 pm

Uba Tracker wrote:Hi Vic, great to hear that your experience with arc welding was a positive one, but you're right I should have balanced my comments by pointing out that arc welding is significantly cheaper in initial set up costs. To qualify what I said earlier it is my experience that arc welding presents more challenges to the inexperienced welder in terms of satisfying results than say the brazing process. No one should be discouraged from expanding their skill base so my apologies to all if I appeared 'anti' arc welding, by all means give it a go. Follow Steve's (Vonhazza) lead and do a welding course, you'll learn accepted practices and hopefully minimise the frustration that results in many a welder gathering dust. :wink:

regards

Harry


No worries Harry, I agree. You can rest assured that as soon as I have stashed away enough change, I will get me a mig. Cheers :)
User avatar
vic
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:24 pm
Location: Bowning (Yass) NSW

Homebuilt recumbents

Postby Ricco » Thu Aug 07, 2008 10:13 am

I have built several recumbents all with arc welding.

Low budget stuff, and guess that is the point, half the fun realy is making something that some would charge you an arm and a leg for, you get to try something out for very little cost.

Tig etc. would be nice, but have had only one failure with arc. That was outside my house on a fork I tried to modified that I thought probably was'nt going to be strong enough, I was right. Nearly had a kitten when it broke, even though I was expecting it.

Current version uses a bottom bracket and forks from uprights and all other bits are custom made, welded and ground. Including the stem of the forks. I taught myself to weld.

Not always pretty, generally lots of grinding if pretty is a factor. Though have made some stuff that even I did not think was possible.

Have fun, nearly forgot I always employ the jump test or something similar. Put thing of the ground supported between two pieces of wood and step on it, be realistic here, if you can flex the metal around the joint then most likely it will hold up.

Take care, explore, enjoy! :idea:
Ricco
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 10:32 am
Location: Brisbane Sunnybank Hills

CHOPPERS

Postby antipathyincarnate » Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:05 pm

Hi there

I guess my choppers are recumbents. We're about to have a go at a production version. We're happy to take advice or have extra people come on board to help.

Don

I can't post the link but if you'd like to see them just drop me a line
User avatar
antipathyincarnate
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2008 9:24 am

Arc up.

Postby Recycler » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:22 am

Howdy All,
Here is some more information on stick welders, I have found the best rods I use are marked for Mild & Medium Tensile Steels E 6012 2mm. On a Inverter welder I use about 45 amps. Long Live Stick Welders :lol: :lol:
Recycler
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 10:32 am
Location: Woolgoolga NSW

Re: Homebuilders.

Postby vic » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:33 am

nutz4bikez wrote:Hey guys :)

Are any of you into building your own recumbents?

I have built a few now and love looking at the work of others so I hope you aren't shy about showing off your work.

I will be posting pics of some of mine as soon as I am allowed to.


Got any piccys yet?
User avatar
vic
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:24 pm
Location: Bowning (Yass) NSW

Re: Arc up.

Postby Uba Tracker » Tue Dec 09, 2008 7:27 pm

Recycler wrote:Howdy All,
Here is some more information on stick welders, I have found the best rods I use are marked for Mild & Medium Tensile Steels E 6012 2mm. On a Inverter welder I use about 45 amps. Long Live Stick Welders :lol: :lol:


Hey there Bob, yeah good advice the 6012's are a very versatile electrode. Just for everyones info the breakdown of the classification E6012 goes like this. 'E' stands for electrode (no prizes there), the '60' is the tensile strength of the weld deposit in Mpa's (megapascals) and the '12' denotes the composition of the flux, the '12' designation means a reasonably fluid flux or slag whilst welding suitable for most downhand or horizontal welding. Personally I like the Lincoln 4113's or 6013's, the '13' in this case denotes a more viscous slag whilst welding making it more suitable for positional work (vertical up, overhead etc) where the more stable slag can aid in the control of the molten weld pool.

cheers all

Harry
A bad day's riding beats a good day's work everytime
User avatar
Uba Tracker
 
Posts: 252
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: Toowoomba, Qld

Welding rods?

Postby Freddyflatfoot » Fri Dec 12, 2008 9:05 pm

Hmm, might check to see what I'm using!
I found that the Cigweld 1.6mm rods have been the best for me, for welding light gauge steel. Still need to be careful to not get too much heat into the work though!
I'll have a look in the shed before I go to work shortly.
Cheers!
Rob
---------------------------------------------------
Homebuilt trike, with electric assist
26"/20" trike, "Goanna"
SWB recumbent, 700C/451 , "Kookaburra", homebuilt.
FWD project (Cyclone).
Optima Raptor
User avatar
Freddyflatfoot
 
Posts: 237
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:50 am
Location: Ballarat, Victoria

Re: Welding rods?

Postby Uba Tracker » Sun Dec 14, 2008 5:14 pm

Freddyflatfoot wrote:Hmm, might check to see what I'm using!
I found that the Cigweld 1.6mm rods have been the best for me, for welding light gauge steel. Still need to be careful to not get too much heat into the work though!
I'll have a look in the shed before I go to work shortly.


Hi Rob, I wouldn't stress too much about the class of electrode you are using, particularly if you getting good results. I'm sure you're aware of the adage,"Don't fix it if ain't broke." As far as electrode classification goes it is my experience that electrode quality far out-weighs the small difference between the classes, so the upshot is buy name brand good quality rods and you'll be right.

cheers

H
A bad day's riding beats a good day's work everytime
User avatar
Uba Tracker
 
Posts: 252
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: Toowoomba, Qld

Postby JulianEdgar » Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:40 am

I don't think that anyone has mentioned using flux coated nickel bronze brazing rods. I use them (plus oxy acetylene of course) on chrome moly tube, building up only small fillet. Very strong and pretty easy to do.
JulianEdgar
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 7:35 am

Re: Homebuilders.

Postby Gecko Racer » Sun Jun 14, 2009 8:51 pm

Just about to start on my third HPV. 1st was a practice, 2nd became a race bike for the children at my school and this one hopefully will be a little lighter and more streamlined to help us go faster than we have in the past. Looking to incorporate Chromoly for the roll bars and side intrusion but will continue to use mild steel (school chairs and desk frames) for the frame. This fits in with our intent to recycle and allows the children to have some ownership of the process.
I have used a MIG so far and this seems to work fine on the mild steel but my research leads me to think that Brazing may be more effective for the Chromoly. Having no experience with this I would appreciate any helpful advice.

Cheers
Gecko Racer
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 8:15 pm

Re: Homebuilders.

Postby papa » Thu Jun 18, 2009 4:36 am

Unlike like MIG or stick, oxy-gas is similar to TIG in many respects - torch in one hand, filler in the other. And like TIG, the beauty of gas, is that you have full and complete control over heat input and filler quantity from beginning to end. Brazing chromoly isn't any different than mild steel as long as you abide by the basics with proper pre-brazing preparation and don't char the flux. I prefer paste flux and bare rod because it allows me to coat all surfaces prior to adding heat - this helps to prevent premature oxidation.

The coupon sample shown below was brazed with generic, 64kpsi tensile LFB (the cheap stuff) and Harris (Black) paste flux. It was extremely rusty 1/4" thick mild steel (ground to .200"), and the fillet was done in a single, 15 second pass using a Victor #4 tip fed with propane and oxygen. The sample was then allowed to cool and bent in an AWS coupon bender.

Image

And by simply attaching a smaller tip on the very same torch, you can silver solder 2mm stainless spokes:

Image
User avatar
papa
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: USA

Re: Homebuilders.

Postby John Lewis » Thu Jun 18, 2009 8:54 pm

G'day papa,
Seem to recall meeting you on another forum. If I remember right you were using an ex medical oxygen generator. If I'm correct, would you mind giving a few details about it and how you find it. I have my sights on one but don't know much about their use.

John Lewis
John Lewis
 
Posts: 1167
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:12 pm
Location: Albany. 400km South of Perth

Next

Return to Recumbents

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter