BB / Crankset / Derailleurs replacement

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BB / Crankset / Derailleurs replacement

Postby TethAdam5 » Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:30 pm

I have a 2008 OCR 3 that will need some replacements soon, so I wanted to upgrade most of the major components in the drivetrain.

It currently has 2200 series Front & Rear Derailleurs, Crankset and what I have discovered is a Truativ BB7420 bottom bracket (113mm spindle, BB Shell width 68mm English).

I only want to marginally upgrade and have found the following parts on Ribble for around $150 to upgrade my current set-up:

Crankset

Front Derailleur

Rear Derailleur

Now obviously that crankset requires a different BB than my OCR has (ES30 BS68-118 English), and this is where I am trying to confirm - can I use a splined 118mm spindle BB as a replacement on this bike?

Is there anything else I've missed in selecting these parts (apart from some tools etc)

Thanks for any help.
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by BNA » Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:43 pm

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Postby Kalgrm » Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:43 pm

I'd be reluctant to put a 118mm spindle on a frame that originally had 113mm specified unless the crankset allowed for that extra 2.5mm on the drive side by offsetting the chain rings back into the frame. You might get away with it though.

You'll probably need new gear cables. If it turns out that you need a new chain (due to a mismatch between the old worn chain and the new chain rings), you'll also need a new cassette.

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Postby twizzle » Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:44 pm

Why Sora? And why do you need to upgrade?
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Postby gclark8 » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:10 pm

I have a new Sora C/s & BB for sale:
http://www.bikeexchange.com.au/bikes/preview/100004919

Pick up Perth only.
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Postby TethAdam5 » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:27 pm

twizzle wrote:Why Sora? And why do you need to upgrade?


Why Sora - I've aimed for the cheapest swap possible for my commute bike parts, and they are the only available 8-speed triple chain ring set-up that will match my shifters.

Why the upgrade - its more preparedness than anything else - some of the parts to match an 8-speed triple set-up are hard to get a hold of and I noticed them on ribble recently, my rear derailleur is a little banged up from a few falls throughout the year (shifts, but is a long way from smooth) and the front chainring (middle ring) has some chipped teeth (not sure how that happened).

I am planning on a new bike at the end of next year, but at the same time, I want this bike as a spare to be reliable.

I am also interested in learning how to replace this stuff for future reference, and this bike will make good practice for when I splash out on the next one.
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Postby artemidorus » Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:11 pm

One "upgrades" because something isn't working, or because one can't resist the bling. Sora ain't bling, so that just leaves the other reason. You haven't mentioned that your crankset/FD are failing in any way, so it is difficult to justify that change. The RD is probably the only reasonable replacement, but have you checked the hanger alignment before replacing it?
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Postby twizzle » Wed Nov 12, 2008 11:45 pm

TethAdam5 wrote:
twizzle wrote:Why Sora? And why do you need to upgrade?


Why Sora - I've aimed for the cheapest swap possible for my commute bike parts, and they are the only available 8-speed triple chain ring set-up that will match my shifters.

Why the upgrade - its more preparedness than anything else - some of the parts to match an 8-speed triple set-up are hard to get a hold of and I noticed them on ribble recently, my rear derailleur is a little banged up from a few falls throughout the year (shifts, but is a long way from smooth) and the front chainring (middle ring) has some chipped teeth (not sure how that happened).

I am planning on a new bike at the end of next year, but at the same time, I want this bike as a spare to be reliable.

I am also interested in learning how to replace this stuff for future reference, and this bike will make good practice for when I splash out on the next one.


Sounds like you just need a chain ring and new cables.

but...

Re. the derailleur, they are 'generally' (Dura-ace reportedly are the exception) compatible regardless of no. of gears, so you could stick a Tiagra/105 9/10-speed on and get some bling at the same time - just make sure it's the triple version ie for 105 it would be the RD-5500-GS/RD-5600-GS or for Tiagra it's a a RD-4500-GS. I picked up a current 105 triple new on EBay recently for $50.

Tools will set you back a lot more. You will need a rear cable at least, so the Park cable cutter is $90+, ~$25 for a set of Dura-ace cables (don't waste time on cheaper ones) and a 5mm hex key for the bolts. And the shimano chain ring nut tool is about $20 from memory.
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Postby Kalgrm » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:12 am

twizzle wrote: You will need a rear cable at least, so the Park cable cutter is $90+ ....

Whoa! I must have been very lucky over the years, because my old side cutters or pliers have always done the job. My Swiss Army "Leatherman" rip-off cuts even better (cable and housing).

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Postby lemmiwinks » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:25 am

Kalgrm wrote:
twizzle wrote: You will need a rear cable at least, so the Park cable cutter is $90+ ....

Whoa! I must have been very lucky over the years, because my old side cutters or pliers have always done the job.


:D Yep, me too.
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Postby il padrone » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:32 am

Kalgrm wrote:
twizzle wrote: You will need a rear cable at least, so the Park cable cutter is $90+ ....

Whoa! I must have been very lucky over the years, because my old side cutters or pliers have always done the job.

A specific cable-cutter will always cut your cables neater than side cutters. It has two crescent blades that encircle the cable as they cut - doesn't squeeze the strands flat.

Kalgrm wrote:My Swiss Army "Leatherman" rip-off cuts even better (cable and housing).

Was that brake housings or SIS cable housings? Because the modern indexed derailleur cable housings are virtually impossible to cut properly without the correct tools. Longitudinal wire strands will just get mashed with a side cutter. You'd probably be better off cutting them with a hacksaw :roll:
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Postby Kalgrm » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:11 am

il padrone wrote:
Kalgrm wrote:My Swiss Army "Leatherman" rip-off cuts even better (cable and housing).

Was that brake housings or SIS cable housings? Because the modern indexed derailleur cable housings are virtually impossible to cut properly without the correct tools. Longitudinal wire strands will just get mashed with a side cutter. You'd probably be better off cutting them with a hacksaw :roll:

Both types with the Swiss Army thing. It has what amounts to a heavy duty scissor as its cutting tool, where it shears the cable and housing rather than "pinches" it as the side cutters do.

I don't doubt the correct tool would be better (and they can be had for <$50 from CRC) but I baulk at spending more than $90 for a tool when I already have tools lying around which will do the job. I bet there is a tool at Bunnies which would also duplicate the action of the Park Tools one at a fraction of the cost.

Cheers,
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Postby lemmiwinks » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:29 am

il padrone wrote:Was that brake housings or SIS cable housings? Because the modern indexed derailleur cable housings are virtually impossible to cut properly without the correct tools. Longitudinal wire strands will just get mashed with a side cutter. You'd probably be better off cutting them with a hacksaw :roll:


:lol: I cut my housings with a hacksaw and tidy up on the bench grinder/linisher. But all my stuff is very old school, I only just got given an SIS equipped bike on the weekend.
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Postby twizzle » Thu Nov 13, 2008 1:02 pm

Genuine SIS cable housings are made using spring steel wires - which are hi-tensile and at least 65% the hardness of high quality side cutters, 80% the hardness of a hacksaw blade, and of similar hardness to garden variety side cutters and pliers.

I'll bet my Park cable cutter is still working perfectly after many more cable housings.... can you say the same thing about cheap pliers, side cutters and hacksaw blades?
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Postby sittingbison » Thu Nov 13, 2008 1:31 pm

you call those cutters...THIS is cutters
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Postby lemmiwinks » Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:07 pm

twizzle wrote:Genuine SIS cable housings are made using spring steel wires - which are hi-tensile and at least 65% the hardness of high quality side cutters, 80% the hardness of a hacksaw blade, and of similar hardness to garden variety side cutters and pliers.

I'll bet my Park cable cutter is still working perfectly after many more cable housings.... can you say the same thing about cheap pliers, side cutters and hacksaw blades?


In that case I'll just use the dremel with a cut off wheel :wink:

P.S I just replace my hacksaw blade when it's worn out. :P
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Postby Kalgrm » Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:36 pm

twizzle wrote:I'll bet my Park cable cutter is still working perfectly after many more cable housings.... can you say the same thing about cheap pliers, side cutters and hacksaw blades?

Yeah, you're probably right. My cheap side cutters are about five or six years old now. I've probably only cut 16 or 20 cable housings over that time, but they aren't showing the signs yet. Yours, costing about 7 times what I paid, should last you a life time. There's no doubt I will need to spend another $15 dollars in a few years when mine eventually wear out.

Shall we compare notes in thirty years? ;)

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Postby lemmiwinks » Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:53 pm

Kalgrm wrote:
twizzle wrote:I'll bet my Park cable cutter is still working perfectly after many more cable housings.... can you say the same thing about cheap pliers, side cutters and hacksaw blades?

Yeah, you're probably right. My cheap side cutters are about five or six years old now. I've probably only cut 16 or 20 cable housings over that time, but they aren't showing the signs yet. Yours, costing about 7 times what I paid, should last you a life time. There's no doubt I will need to spend another $15 dollars in a few years when mine eventually wear out.

Shall we compare notes in thirty years? ;)

Cheers,
Graeme


Ooh you're a bad man Graeme! :lol: I think we all agree though that there are times when a special tool for a certain job has no substitute (removing a screw on freewheel comes to mind, or a freehub lockring). But there are plenty of times when there's more than one way to skin a cat.
Last edited by lemmiwinks on Fri Nov 14, 2008 8:01 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby rustychisel » Thu Nov 13, 2008 3:37 pm

Fark!!! That's bit hardcore, using sidecutters to skin a cat.... :wink:
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Postby sittingbison » Thu Nov 13, 2008 5:03 pm

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Postby lemmiwinks » Fri Nov 14, 2008 7:58 am

rustychisel wrote:Fark!!! That's bit hardcore, using sidecutters to skin a cat.... :wink:


They squirm a bit, but if you shove their head in a gumboot it helps a lot :lol: :wink:
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Postby TethAdam5 » Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:30 am

Thanks for all the replies i think I have it now:

In choosing BB / Derailleurs / Cranksets for my OCR

- cable cutters are the most important decision
- cats are best skinned using sidecutters and putting their head in a gum boot
- Forums are a hard place to get people to stay on topic!!

:P

:lol: :lol: :lol:

LOL
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Postby Kalgrm » Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:35 am

TethAdam5 wrote:- Forums are a hard place to get people to stay on topic!!

..... which only means you'll get a far more thorough education by asking any question on a forum than you would by asking your LBS .... ;)


... unless he uses forums too ....
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