Cone Spanners

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Cone Spanners

Postby Aushiker » Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:07 pm

G'day

Started playing with the Kojima this afternoon and pulled apart the front hub as it was loose. Given it was loose I just did it with my R-OE spanners, but reading up this evening in Chris' book, he suggests that one should use cone spanners for the job.

So my question is, is it worth getting a set of cone spanners? As one example, Phantom Cycles have a set for $38.95.

My plan is to build up my skills working on the bikes.

Thanks
Andrew
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by BNA » Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:10 pm

BNA
 

Postby Kalgrm » Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:10 pm

Yep, definitely. The one I've got I bought some 20 years ago and I used it once again just this morning (working on a mate's MTB with shot bearings).

I only have one though - a shifter or 15mm spanner is enough to work on the lock nut for the cone.

Cheers,
Graeme
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Postby europa » Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:13 pm

Cone spanners are just very thin spanners. You will need them one day so if you're planning to work on bikes, it pays to buy them. However, the question as always is, 'how much'.

Mine have been collected over the years from here and there and rather than being a set of individuals like that, are just pressed steel with a spanner at each end. I've got two cone spanners that do 4 sized cones and that's all you need. I have however, picked up others over the years that are all sorts of shapes and sizes. Your lbs probably has some cheap ones. You don't go putting a lot of weight on them so they don't need to be high tensile steel.

My tip is - if you need it now, go buy what you need.

If you don't need them immediately, haunt second hand tool displays at flea markets and second hand shops - you'll pick up what you need over time, probably only spending a few bucks and having a lovely time in the process (assuming you like digging through old tools like I do).

Richard
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Postby Mulger bill » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:28 pm

You don't NEED cone spanners as such Andrew, but it's quicker with. Oh and the swear jar gets filled slower :wink: A shifter is fine on the locknuts.

For home workshop use, the pressed steel units of which Richard speaks are perfectly adequate, but if the money's burning a hole...

Shaun.

*Starting a religious debate* What's the best technique for perfectly adjusted bearings, first time, every time?
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Postby mikesbytes » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:41 pm

Doesn't it depend on the actual design of the component. Some need cone spanners because conventional spanners are too wide.

You have 2 options;
1. buy the cone spanners and put them away for when/if you need them.
2. discover one night that you can't adjust the thingiewejig attached to the watchyoumccallit and have to wait for the following day to buy the tool from the LBS.

Historically I've done 2.
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Postby Kalgrm » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:15 pm

mikesbytes wrote:Doesn't it depend on the actual design of the component. Some need cone spanners because conventional spanners are too wide.

You have 2 options;
1. buy the cone spanners and put them away for when/if you need them.
2. discover one night that you can't adjust the thingiewejig attached to the watchyoumccallit and have to wait for the following day to buy the tool from the LBS.

Historically I've done 2.

As far as I know, if you have cone bearings, you will need at least one cone spanner. So far, I've only ever needed the one tool which has a couple of different widths on it.

Mulger bill wrote:What's the best technique for perfectly adjusted bearings, first time, every time?

Ooh! Ooh! I know this one - it's a trick question, right? The "first time" part makes it impossible .... ;)

Having said that, I must have fluked it today. Got it in one go. My technique is to do the first side up tight, hand tighten the cone on the other side, THEN lube the thread and install the lock nut to hand tight. Hold the cone with the cone spanner and use the normal/shifter spanner to tighten the lock nut against it. Et voila! You're done!

Lubing the thread after installing the cone lets the lock nut turn on the thread without unscrewing the cone. (Another way would be to hand tighten the lock nut, hold the lock nut on the opposite side (already tightened side) of the axel in a vice and then tighten the lock nut against the cone on the second side.)

Cheers,
Graeme
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Postby europa » Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:27 pm

One of my 'cone' spanners started life as a normal spanner, then got very intimate with my grinder :shock:

It's funny this fear and loathing of cone setups. I love them and have no trouble setting them. It's just feel and if you need to do it once or twice, so be it, but there's nothing scary or hard about them. Hell, and I'm a 'tighten the nut till it strips then back off half a turn' sort of mechanic.

I think I was lucky with the Dad I had. He's no mechanical genius and taught me how to unstuff stuffups :shock: But he also taught me mechanical sympathy, how to teach your fingers to 'listen' to the parts. To me, this business of having to rely on tension wrenches (yes, I have one, a very good that is used extensively when needed) for everything is an anathma, because I know how unreliable they can be and how easy it is to fool them. I'd much rather a system that relies on feel and which rewards feel. But then again, to me, a mechanical system is something alive that needs love and understanding, not a mindless pile of components to be subjugated by mathematical charts and cold hearted instruments.

Richard
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Postby Mulger bill » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:06 am

Those last three lines, *sniff* beautiful :D

Think it's time I went back in the shed for a chat...

Shaun
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