peugeot quill size - goto love the french!

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peugeot quill size - goto love the french!

Postby ukalipt » Sat Feb 23, 2008 12:14 am

so i have a pe8 peugeot. french everything... BB... head set.. etc etc etc. i know... life can be hard.

question is. the headset is 22mm [so i have worked out for Sheldon]

could i fit a 22.2 quill in it without too much trouble, or does the .2 mm really make a difference?

i think from sheldons site it should be ok.
i like to pedal
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by BNA » Sat Feb 23, 2008 8:12 am

BNA
 

Postby kukamunga » Sat Feb 23, 2008 8:12 am

Being French, they probably didn't want anything to do with 'Imperial' British sizes, and sensibly chose Metric. Uh.... why is it that we are still using imperial sizes for a lot of bike stuff? And why are the Yanks so backward in not going metric? Oh, I think I just answered my first question, didn't I? America won WWII, didn't they (in Hollywood)? :roll:
God save the ABC & SBS.....
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Postby ukalipt » Sat Feb 23, 2008 8:36 am

hey kukamunga,
when you get a chance, check your personal messages. i sent you a message.
i like to pedal
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Postby 531db » Sat Feb 23, 2008 9:49 am

A 22.2mm stem usually will not fit straight up into a french 22.0mm fork or the headset locknut, however if you take your chosen 22.2mm stem and then lightly sand down the quill below the insertion mark by rotating the stem evenly in some fine sand paper you'll soon get there.

Remember to check the size frequently by trying to insert the stem into the fork, and once 'undersized' it's best not to use the stem in a 22.2mm fork again.

I've done this with old Nitto and Kalloy stems on a 1988 Peugeot Mont Blanc.
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Postby cludence » Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:09 am

Best person to ask about anything Peugeot related would be the Peugeot fanatic who is down here in Sydney. Be warned though, he will probably want your Peugeot!

No, he is a nice guy.

www.chainringtransitauthority.com
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Postby ukalipt » Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:45 am

thanks 531
i might just do the search for a 22mm straight up then to save the sanding issue. i am sure i can find one on ebay somewhere.

and cludence, lynn is an inspiration to me an my peugeot fetish. those BB are just to die for. do you know if was him interviewed on nova about his peugeot for the girls bike ride around canada bay?

i actually need to pickup/find a larger frame. mines a little small for me. but i just love the peugeot[s]
i like to pedal
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Postby cludence » Sat Feb 23, 2008 12:05 pm

Yes that was him on Nova. He is a lovely guy.

Karen.
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Postby singletracking » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:04 pm

I have a really nice 3TTT 22.0 stem. About 100-110mm

It's no use to me as I have no French bikes and don't intend owning one any time soon! :wink:

PM or email me if you'd be interested in it
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Postby Kid_Carbine » Sat Mar 01, 2008 1:52 am

kukamunga wrote:Being French, they probably didn't want anything to do with 'Imperial' British sizes, and sensibly chose Metric. Uh.... why is it that we are still using imperial sizes for a lot of bike stuff? And why are the Yanks so backward in not going metric? Oh, I think I just answered my first question, didn't I? America won WWII, didn't they (in Hollywood)? :roll:


The problem in switching from one weights & measure measurement standard to another where there are no direct equivalants & where the old system can't be completely withdrawn [like money was] is that so much of the old system remains.

For example, the standard width of an existing road in Australia is still one chain, 66 feet, 100 links, 22 yards. [yes, the surveyor actually had a measuring chain] Australia went metric but it's not physically possible to move every suburban fenceline to make the roads fit the new standard, so we simply express the old dimension in the new metric numbers which converts to an odd number with a decimal point & a string of digits after it.

Many people round the number to a convenient approximation but this should not be acceptable as our road in the example is an exact measurement, so the metric conversion should be exact too, which of course leacves us with a long & inconvenient number. [1 chain = 20.1168m approximately, not 20m]
The same sizing problems applies to existing buildings, property dimensions etc. etc.
This means that we need to work with a double standard for many many decades & perhaps even forever.

I have wonderfull old British standard bikes & old American cars that I have had for decades & plan to do so for a few more, but already I am talking with parts & hardware people that were never taught the Imperial system at school, & they should be, so that when somebody, like me, needs a 3/8 UNF hex head capscrew or a quantity of 15/17/15 gauge double butted spokes I don't have to play the role of the school teacher & educate a whole generation. That's the domain of the board of studies.

Metric money was easy as most values interchanged & those that didn't were easily withdrawn [Halfpenny, penny & threepenny coins ] The new denominations even shared the size & weight [coins] & colour [notes] of the equivalant Imperial denominations, but changing the whole Australian system of weights & measures was a total waste of effort in my view as nothing was demonstrably gained other than decades of confusion & [at first] a whole new breed of con men & scammers.

Now if a metre was shortened to 36" & a killometre was reduced to half a mile, a kilo equaling 2 pounds exactly, a litre being the same as a quart, etc etc, then perhaps the metric system could be ok as the direct equivalants would make conversion both easy & relevant, just like the money was.

Yeah yeah, I know, I'm a Ludite & should be thrashed within 25,4mm of my life & I bet that while that was happening somebody would 12.7mm my bike. :wink:
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22mm French Stems

Postby CTA » Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:14 am

I see people are talking about me behind my back!

22mm stems are not common but not rare. At the moment, Rivendell has a stash of Nitto stems that are 22mm. Also many inexpensive 22.2mm stems will fit snugly into a French steerer without modification. Nitto, Cinelli, 3TTT, and the better quality stuff never fits. That is stating the obvious.

I also salvage as many stems as I can from old French bikes. But beware that the rumour about Atax death stems is very real. Pivo, Phillipe, and several other French brands are of very high quality. I do use some Atax stems, but mostly where I know the stem is not going to be used under high stress, ie. sprinting or hard climbing.

I am very hesitant to sand or turn down a 22.2mm stem, since unless you are very careful, you will create a stress riser and we all know what happens to aluminum with stress risers...

Just my 2¢,
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Postby kukamunga » Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:47 am

Kid_Carbine wrote:....within 25,4mm of my....

Sorry. Is that the American 25.400508001 mm or the British 25.399978 mm ?? :wink: :wink:
God save the ABC & SBS.....
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Postby Hotdog » Sat Mar 01, 2008 9:33 am

kukamunga wrote:
Kid_Carbine wrote:....within 25,4mm of my....

Sorry. Is that the American 25.400508001 mm or the British 25.399978 mm ?? :wink: :wink:

Actually these days the inch is defined relative to the standard metre (which is in turn defined by the speed of light and the standard second, and the standard second is defined by a certain transition in a rubidium atom...) and so it's exactly (no approximations whatsoever) 25.4mm.

I think it's the only conversion that can be exactly expressed in decimal notation, all those silly 1/12ths, 1/16ths or 1/1760ths mess things up for all the other imperial units.
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Postby cludence » Sat Mar 01, 2008 10:21 am

I see people are talking about me behind my back!


Good to see the Peugeot man himself has joined us! Dont forget to post some pics of your bike insanity.

-Will make me look sane. :)
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Postby Kid_Carbine » Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:21 pm

Hotdog wrote:Actually these days the inch is defined relative to the standard metre (which is in turn defined by the speed of light and the standard second, and the standard second is defined by a certain transition in a rubidium atom...) and so it's exactly (no approximations whatsoever) 25.4mm.

Ummmmmmm, ... errrrrr, ... what he said.
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