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Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:18 am
by ColinOldnCranky
In the interest of saving space and a little weight in the back pack I have just bought a small CO2 inflator - two bottles and a screw on valve. Instruction/explanation are almost nothing.

So seekign some clarification:

I assume that by screwing the valve onto the bottle tightly it will then have cracked the bottle open.

Once this is done, does the whole thing remain fully useable for an extended time? Or does it leak out over a relatively short period - say a month or so.

I suppose what I am needing to know is - Do I leave the bits NOT fitted together for the time baing and then wait until I need to use it? I would rather not as I am sure to not find both the bottle and the valve at that time of need. Better to have the whole lot in my bag as one.

Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 1:18 am
by Yagan
I keep mine separate. I imagine it would be easy enough to bump the valve and loose your gas so I put them together just before I use them

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 5:45 am
by greyhoundtom
I keep mine partially screwed in but not far enough for the inflator mechanism to puncture the CO2 container.

It keeps the whole thing together, and then it is just a matter of screwing it in the rest of the way when I need it.

Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 7:27 am
by MREJ
I keep them separate.

Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 7:50 am
by Kenzo
Separate.
Be careful when using it, I've seen people freeze their thumb to the bare metal.
Damn convenient these things. I have been bringing home the used canister and putting it in the recycling in an attempt to reduce the environmental impacts of my laziness.

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:12 am
by jacks1071
ColinOldnCranky wrote:In the interest of saving space and a little weight in the back pack I have just bought a small CO2 inflator - two bottles and a screw on valve. Instruction/explanation are almost nothing.

So seekign some clarification:

I assume that by screwing the valve onto the bottle tightly it will then have cracked the bottle open.

Once this is done, does the whole thing remain fully useable for an extended time? Or does it leak out over a relatively short period - say a month or so.

I suppose what I am needing to know is - Do I leave the bits NOT fitted together for the time baing and then wait until I need to use it? I would rather not as I am sure to not find both the bottle and the valve at that time of need. Better to have the whole lot in my bag as one.


Once you puncture the cannister, the remaining air will leak out within 24hrs - to inflate a tyre to 120psi you need an entire cannister anyway so you won't have much left (if any).

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:15 am
by mitzikatzi
Gloves and glasses for PPE when you use them.

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:38 am
by ColinOldnCranky
jacks1071 wrote:Once you puncture the cannister, the remaining air will leak out within 24hrs - to inflate a tyre to 120psi you need an entire cannister anyway so you won't have much left (if any).

Thanks jacks, that's what I needed to know.

I only pump to around 50psi or so but with a more voluminous tyre (24x1.75) so I imagine a cannister for that too.

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 1:37 pm
by bosvit
greyhoundtom wrote:I keep mine partially screwed in but not far enough for the inflator mechanism to puncture the CO2 container.

It keeps the whole thing together, and then it is just a matter of screwing it in the rest of the way when I need it.

+1

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 2:06 pm
by DoogleDave
I keep mine separate as well (haven't had to use any as yet - touch wood).

And with MTB/wider tyres even though you're only pumping up to a lesser psi, the more volume required will empty most cannisters.
If you look on the manufacturer's website they will likely say what their cannister will inflate to for a given tyre size.

700C is usually around the 120psi mark and a 26" MTB tyre around 30-40psi (enough to get you home).

I would also make sure that when you buy the part that connects to your valve you get one with a control know, so you can release the pressure as quickly or slowly as you like....as I believe some that don't have the control knob can just start inflating at full pressure the moment you push it against your valve....and if you're not careful (or ready) you could waste half your CO2.

I also always carry two cannisters (just in case one doesn't work, or something happens and I need more CO2, or I get two punctures on the same ride)...and I always carry two new tubes as well.

Dave

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:43 pm
by ironhanglider
In the interests of recycling rather than creating a new thread I thought I'd dredge up this one.

Despite 35 years of racing experience I have only ever used one CO2 canister to inflate a tyre and even then it was someone else's flat. My inflator came with an insulating sleeve and so I used it since I have a fair understanding of the physics involved and knew it'd get mighty cold.

I'm putting together a tandem for a mate and bought a Lezyne Road Drive CFH pump to go with it. This comes complete with a hose that can also be attached to a CO2 canister and the mounting bracket goes under a bidon cage with pump on one side and canister on the other. Sadly however the canister does not come with an insulating sleeve to stop your fingers freezing to it when it is used. Unlike my inflator there is no option to hold onto something else, the canister screws straight onto the hose which is presumably already attached to the valve.

My question is how much insulation do you need? I've discovered that a dead tube that I have is just the right size to make a sleeve for a bunch of canisters. Will this be enough or am I condemning him to a nasty surprise.

I'm hoping some of the perennial Black Cat competition leaders have come across this before. Not that I'm looking in Twizzle's direction in particular.

Cheers,

Cameron

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:49 pm
by drubie
I've inflated tyres with co2 without a sleeve, it gets cold and I would resist the temptation to lick it but it's hardly life threatening.

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 6:30 pm
by find_bruce
drubie wrote:I've inflated tyres with co2 without a sleeve, it gets cold and I would resist the temptation to lick it but it's hardly life threatening.

Pity - that would make a great video :D

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:18 pm
by ironhanglider
Thanks gents,

Since I've got the tube anyway, I'll make the sleeves for all the canisters I've got. It might be only a marginal benefit but it doesn't cost much.

Cheers,

Cameron

Re: Question re CO2 inflators

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:34 pm
by skull
[quote="DoogleDave"a 26" MTB tyre around 30-40psi (enough to get you home).
[/quote]

30-40 psi on my MTB is at the top end of what is required.