Cassette types 9 cogs V 8 cogs.

Workshop tales, trials and disasters.
Maintenance tips, techniques and myths.
Technical discussion, description and outright lies

Cassette types 9 cogs V 8 cogs.

Postby martinjs » Sun Apr 27, 2008 2:56 pm

I have been looking at cassette types on new bikes and notice that some bikes have are 24 speed instead of 27 speed's, mainly due to the cassette have 8 cogs.
I've tried to investigate by looking at the Shimano web site and noticed on the American site they have the Shimano 2200 and that the cassette is the CS-HG50-8R. At a brief glance it appears this is rated one rank below the Sora cassette.

Can anyone tell me if this is just because it has one cog less or that the quality is lower than the Sora?
ie, will it wear out quicker and maybe cost more in the long run.
Thanks
Martin
User avatar
martinjs
 
Posts: 3388
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:54 pm
Location: Fivebough, Leeton

by BNA » Sun Apr 27, 2008 7:22 pm

BNA
 

Postby martinjs » Sun Apr 27, 2008 7:22 pm

I may have answered my own question. With some more research I have found more info on the Shimano Europe web site that appears to say the 8 cog cassettes are Sora based anyway.
Any more info on wear would still be greatly appreciated.

Martin
User avatar
martinjs
 
Posts: 3388
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:54 pm
Location: Fivebough, Leeton

Postby mikesbytes » Sun Apr 27, 2008 7:47 pm

Are you talking road or mtb ?

Perhaps we should start with a bit of history, the number of cogs increased from 5 thru to 8 by making the frame wider and/or making the area available on the wheel wider for the cogs. After a competitor added another cog by making them narrower together, Shimano did the same and made the 9 speed, which has a narrower chain and narrower cogs. Later they made the 10 speed with the same cogs as the nine speed but closer together again and with a even narrower chain.

Today all of top end road group sets are 10 speed, Campag makes all of their group sets in 10 speed, where Shimano make medium quality sets in 9 speed and lower quality sets in 8 speed.

So from that, I'm telling you that 9 speed is better quality than 8 speed. However what that doesn't tell you is about durability. Durability is the opposite, 8 speed is superior to 9 speed has the components have more metal in them and therefor will last longer. Also 8 speed is cheaper than 9 speed, so it costs less to replace 8 speed components.
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14834
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby martinjs » Sun Apr 27, 2008 8:30 pm

That makes sense, possible use an 8 speed for a work bike and keep 9 or 10 speeds for the trainer/racing.

I am talking about road bikes, a couple of bikes that I'm looking at a flat bar roadies with 24 speed bikes, they seem to usually have the Tiagra rear Derailleurs combined with 8 cog cassettes but they don't name the group set there from. The closest I've found on the Shimano Europe web site is the CS-HG50-8 Cassette Sprockets. None of the other sites seem to list one.

Thanks Mike that simple explanation helps heaps.

Martin
User avatar
martinjs
 
Posts: 3388
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:54 pm
Location: Fivebough, Leeton


Return to The Shed

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Dragster1



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers
> BNA Cycling Kit