Maintaining a bike near the beach

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Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby Venus62 » Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:43 am

As I'm now the proud owner of a new road bike, I was thinking of leaving my Scott Hybrid at our beach place for pottering around on the bike tracks. The main thing holding me back is the thought of it slowly succumbing to corrosion from being so near to the beach and the salty atmosphere. Any tips on how to best protect it?

Cheers

Edit: because man thing is not the same as main thing...
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by BNA » Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:55 am

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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby silentbutdeadly » Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:55 am

Wash/wipe it down with fresh water after each period of use. Cover when not in use. Use Lanotec spray or similar on the chain before you store it - wipe it off again before you use it.
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby Uncle Just » Fri Jan 04, 2013 8:40 am

I've noticed far more corrosion on my nephew's bikes living and training as he does on the GC. You'll have to be more fastidious in your regular maintenance such as with chains and cables. The fresh water wipe down is good advice. Regardless of frame material, one overlooked item is to take out the seatpost more often than you would normally to clean and grease it. He didn't and it's stuck fast in a carbon frame.
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby Venus62 » Fri Jan 04, 2013 9:59 am

Thanks for the advice. Sorry if this is a stupid question, but would an old sheet make a reasonable cover?
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby uncle arthur » Fri Jan 04, 2013 10:06 am

It's not just about covering it - it's about the extra salt and moisture in the air.

I bought a bike 2nd hand on the GC - it had been stored inside the garage unridden for about 12 months, but still showed surface rust on the chain, and on a few other small areas like exposed cable etc. So regular lubrication and maintenance - perhaps even a light silicone spray inbetween rides, just to help prevent exposure/corrosion?

Alternatively, why not ask the LBS where you bought it for their recommendations?
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby jules21 » Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:11 pm

aluminium will not rust, as it is coated with a thin layer of oxide. steel will, though. the chain and cables are the obvious candidates. as mentioned, just spray WD 40 on a rag and wipe over those parts before storing.
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby Venus62 » Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:26 pm

jules21 wrote:aluminium will not rust, as it is coated with a thin layer of oxide. steel will, though. the chain and cables are the obvious candidates. as mentioned, just spray WD 40 on a rag and wipe over those parts before storing.


I thought WD40/RP7 was bad for chains? Or is it just that they would need relubing before next use.
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby jules21 » Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:28 pm

Venus62 wrote:I thought WD40/RP7 was bad for chains? Or is it just that they would need relubing before next use.

in retrospect, you're probably better off just using chain lube.
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby mxmort » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:16 pm

Good question mate and thanks for ideas
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Re: Maintaining a bike near the beach

Postby iAMpO » Sat Feb 16, 2013 8:02 am

Our house is 150 metres from the Coral Sea. The strong sea breezes summer and winter carry the salt with them in the air. In the time we've been here I've learned that if you live near the ocean, everything made of metal will oxidise, corrode or rust at an almost unbelievably accelerated rate. The key to managing this with a iron or alloy framed bicycle or a motorcycle is proactive prevention, which in the particular requires a high frequency regular cleaning schedule. IME a cover will keep the dust off, but it really won't make a much difference to the pace of corrosion as the salt is suspended in the humid air and will still. An old sheet is fine.

So what to do. IME in order of importance.

1. Wash the bike with soap and water frequently, preferably at least weekly if it's in regular use rather than (semi-) storage.

2. If you've been in sand or around a salt water environment e.g. brackish surrounding or on bike paths, wash it when you get home or if you're too fatigued to bothered as often one can be, at a minimum at least hose it over with fresh water immediately to remove the majority of the salty krud. Wash it properly later at the earliest opportunity.

3. Lanox is must have protective lubricant for anything metal in a marine environment and won't harm rubber or plastic. I suspect it should be OK around carbon as well. But any lubricant attracts dirt too. Any stainless steel nuts, bolts or parts e.g. front derailleur cage, cables, wipe them over with a Lanox impregnated rag after washing. Any exposed metal or unpainted alloy the same.

4. And of course, regular mechanical maintenance. But chain, cassette etc should all be fine if being lubed and the bike ridden regularly.

Don't be lulled into thinking stainless steel or alloy in the particular is immune. IME any naked alloy surface will oxidise alarmingly rapidly and even the marine environment grade resistant variety stainless steel does too, albeit slower. Resistant not immune. You still need to clean them regularly. I won't buy anything naked stainless steel or alloy any more. e.g. patio furniture, light fittings. Powder coated is a must, which if you take care not to chip the paintwork hugely reduces the maintenance. Paint chips, rinse off and treat immediately with Tectyl until further repair and repainting.
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