First time mounting singles

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First time mounting singles

Postby def » Tue Mar 26, 2013 2:01 pm

Just finished mounting Continental Competitions onto my new Bora Ones this morning. Never done this before and I think it went pretty well.

The instruction videos from Continental (you tube) are pretty good. Only point was I deflated the tyre more than on the video to get the tyre
on the rim - the tyre was almost flat. Still, I managed despite breaking my right wrist 5 weeks ago.

First ride tomorrow - nervous. But I'm looking forward to the legendary feel of tubs. I did add some Continental sealant as a prophylactic
against the began droppings that are prevalent on Perth roads.

Next time I might use a finger wrapped in plastic to spread the glue rather than a brush. I reckon that would be quicker.

def
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by BNA » Wed Mar 27, 2013 11:17 am

BNA
 

Re: First time mounting singles

Postby MattyK » Wed Mar 27, 2013 11:17 am

You always have to be careful mounting singles for the first time. They can be reluctant and quite a handful. It helps to get them well warmed up first though, luckily there are lots of videos on the internet that should help this. Plenty of lubricant may be required too.

You may not get it over the rim the first time, but keep at it with your fingertips and it should eventually ease in to place. Then you can enjoy the ride. Remember to go easy for the first few minutes; you don't want to burst too early or it will deflate instantly.

Remember to wipe up any sticky mess afterwards.
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Re: First time mounting singles

Postby Summernight » Wed Mar 27, 2013 12:26 pm

MattyK wrote:You always have to be careful mounting singles for the first time. They can be reluctant and quite a handful. It helps to get them well warmed up first though, luckily there are lots of videos on the internet that should help this. Plenty of lubricant may be required too.

You may not get it over the rim the first time, but keep at it with your fingertips and it should eventually ease in to place. Then you can enjoy the ride. Remember to go easy for the first few minutes; you don't want to burst too early or it will deflate instantly.

Remember to wipe up any sticky mess afterwards.


:shock:
I think I clicked on the wrong forum... :lol:
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Re: First time mounting singles

Postby def » Wed Mar 27, 2013 1:27 pm

Well I got out for a quick 16km ride this morning on the new wheels.

They certainly feel light - even in comparison to my eurus. I was a bit surprised that they felt a bit harsh - perhaps that's the 10bar in the tyres.

Didn't hammer it around any corners - still nervous about rolling the tyre off. The nervousness isn't helped by the recovering broken wrist.

And I found myself worrying about what I would do if I flatted. The spare tube in my saddlebag would be useless.

TT this Friday so that should test them out.
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Re: First time mounting singles

Postby ironhanglider » Wed Mar 27, 2013 3:46 pm

def wrote:Well I got out for a quick 16km ride this morning on the new wheels.

They certainly feel light - even in comparison to my eurus. I was a bit surprised that they felt a bit harsh - perhaps that's the 10bar in the tyres.

Didn't hammer it around any corners - still nervous about rolling the tyre off. The nervousness isn't helped by the recovering broken wrist.

And I found myself worrying about what I would do if I flatted. The spare tube in my saddlebag would be useless.

TT this Friday so that should test them out.


10 bar = 145psi

Which width are you using?

I know that the 19mm have 145psi specified as the recommended pressure, but frankly that is too much for most roads, the famous 'tubular ride quality' comes from their ability to run lower pressures than clinchers. If you are running the 22 or 25mm versions then the recommended 110psi will give you a better result, they will roll better and corner better (although as with all new tyres clean the mould release off before you go really testing it).

Skinny tyres are not chosen for their ride properties, they are more for aerodynamics and they are designed for use on smooth surfaces. If your road surfaces are pristine hot mix billiard tables then by all means use skinny tyres and pump them up that hard. If your surface is a coarse aggregate then run them lower to get a better suspension effect. There is no need to run the wider versions at that sort of pressure on a normal road, it will hurt both your body and your times.

As for rolling them off, at 145psi there was almost no chance of doing so even if you used no glue :!: If you have done a reasonable glue job you should hold no fears, your tyre will run out of traction with the road long before it comes off the rim. In the past people used to skimp on the glue thinking that it was lighter and faster and rolling tyres was more common as a result. More recently it was worked out that the tyre squirming on the rim caused significant energy losses and that better glued tyres roll faster.

Try running them at 100 front and 110 rear (less if you are a lightweight), and carry a spare. A new tyre and a CO2 cannister can get you underway again pretty quickly.

Cheers,

Cameron
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Re: First time mounting singles

Postby def » Wed Mar 27, 2013 3:56 pm

ironhanglider wrote:
def wrote:Well I got out for a quick 16km ride this morning on the new wheels.

They certainly feel light - even in comparison to my eurus. I was a bit surprised that they felt a bit harsh - perhaps that's the 10bar in the tyres.

Didn't hammer it around any corners - still nervous about rolling the tyre off. The nervousness isn't helped by the recovering broken wrist.

And I found myself worrying about what I would do if I flatted. The spare tube in my saddlebag would be useless.

TT this Friday so that should test them out.


10 bar = 145psi

Which width are you using?

I know that the 19mm have 145psi specified as the recommended pressure, but frankly that is too much for most roads, the famous 'tubular ride quality' comes from their ability to run lower pressures than clinchers. If you are running the 22 or 25mm versions then the recommended 110psi will give you a better result, they will roll better and corner better (although as with all new tyres clean the mould release off before you go really testing it).

Skinny tyres are not chosen for their ride properties, they are more for aerodynamics and they are designed for use on smooth surfaces. If your road surfaces are pristine hot mix billiard tables then by all means use skinny tyres and pump them up that hard. If your surface is a coarse aggregate then run them lower to get a better suspension effect. There is no need to run the wider versions at that sort of pressure on a normal road, it will hurt both your body and your times.

As for rolling them off, at 145psi there was almost no chance of doing so even if you used no glue :!: If you have done a reasonable glue job you should hold no fears, your tyre will run out of traction with the road long before it comes off the rim. In the past people used to skimp on the glue thinking that it was lighter and faster and rolling tyres was more common as a result. More recently it was worked out that the tyre squirming on the rim caused significant energy losses and that better glued tyres roll faster.

Try running them at 100 front and 110 rear (less if you are a lightweight), and carry a spare. A new tyre and a CO2 cannister can get you underway again pretty quickly.

Cheers,

Cameron


Thanks for those many useful points Cameron.

I'm running 22mm Continental Competitions. On my other wheels I mostly run Pro 3 or 4s at 116 psi (8 bar) and they feel good. I'll drop the pressure in the tyres on the next ride.

As for doing a decent glue job - not sure how I can tell! I used a tube and a half of the carbon specific conti cement for two wheels. And I followed the youtube instructions with one layer on the rim and tyre which was allowed to set over 12 hours. Then another layer on the tyre before mounting it. 24 hours later they're on the bike and being ridden.
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Re: First time mounting singles

Postby ironhanglider » Wed Mar 27, 2013 4:10 pm

def wrote:Thanks for those many useful points Cameron.

I'm running 22mm Continental Competitions. On my other wheels I mostly run Pro 3 or 4s at 116 psi (8 bar) and they feel good. I'll drop the pressure in the tyres on the next ride.

As for doing a decent glue job - not sure how I can tell! I used a tube and a half of the carbon specific conti cement for two wheels. And I followed the youtube instructions with one layer on the rim and tyre which was allowed to set over 12 hours. Then another layer on the tyre before mounting it. 24 hours later they're on the bike and being ridden.


Sounds like an acceptable amount of glue and a reasonable method. Unless you missed bits totally or were completely uneven, it sounds like a decent glue job to me. Try pushing it off the rim by hand, that should reassure you.

If I acquired a pair of wheels and tyres with someone else's glue job I'd be testing them by trying to roll them off by hand at various points with the tyres at about 20psi, that lets you see how well stuck they are at the edges. In your case I don't see the need.

Enjoy them.

Cheers,

Cameron
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