Being prepared

Workshop tales, trials and disasters.
Maintenance tips, techniques and myths.
Technical discussion, description and outright lies

Being prepared

Postby r2160 » Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:42 pm

Hi all

Sorry for the newby question, but I just want to be prepared . . .

Do I assume that a basic puncture repair kit should consist of the following (bearing in mind I ride to work so a quick change, and a repair later that night at home) and the bike has quick release hubs.

two tyre levers
two tubes
Pump

Am I missing something here? I just want to be prepared just in case.

cheers
Glenn
-----------
"Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever" Lance Armstrong
r2160
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 4:01 pm
Location: Bass Hill, NSW

by BNA » Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:59 pm

BNA
 

Postby Hawkeye » Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:59 pm

Those items are essential, but what we call a puncture rpeair kit has self-vulcanising patches usually in two sizes, sandpaper to key the surface of the tube around the puncture so the glue will grip, and a little tube of rubber adhesive. Normally they come in a little plastic box.

I'd only bother with two tubes on longer off-road rides. For my home-to-CBD-and-back commuting one, does me fine.
Hawkeye
 

Postby bigfriendlyvegan » Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:59 pm

It's not a repair kit, rather a replacement kit, but yes, that is pretty much all you need. Torpedo 7 has a cheap multi-tool this week which will top that off nicely. Stick it all in an underseat bag and you're on your way. And don't forget a mobile phone for when you get the third puncture!

Cheers,
David
User avatar
bigfriendlyvegan
 
Posts: 2991
Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2008 1:18 pm
Location: Denistone, NSW

Postby r2160 » Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:22 pm

lol

thanks guys

I intend to repair the tubes, but riding to work, quick and simple sounds like the go.

cheers
Glenn
-----------
"Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever" Lance Armstrong
r2160
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 4:01 pm
Location: Bass Hill, NSW

Postby gsxrboy » Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:36 pm

r2160 wrote:lol

thanks guys

I intend to repair the tubes, but riding to work, quick and simple sounds like the go.

cheers
Glenn


Until you puncture all the tubes in one ride ! Get a little $2-3 repair kit as a backup backup :D
gsxrboy
 
Posts: 569
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2007 12:19 pm
Location: Perth

Postby MountGower » Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:53 pm

I'd buy three tyre levers.
MountGower
 

Postby jasimon » Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:00 pm

I also have a pair of disposable gloves in my kit. My hands get really dirty changing a tyre - especially if it is the back one and I get grease from the chain on my hands - and the gloves deal with that problem. I have a rag for a similar reason.

In seatbag:
1 tube
1 patch kit
3 tyre levers
1 pair disposable gloves
1 rag
1 $10 note

On bike:
1 pump
User avatar
jasimon
 
Posts: 1308
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 9:56 am
Location: Riding

Postby cjrich » Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:28 pm

jasimon wrote:I also have a pair of disposable gloves in my kit. My hands get really dirty changing a tyre - especially if it is the back one and I get grease from the chain on my hands - and the gloves deal with that problem. I have a rag for a similar reason.

In seatbag:
1 tube
1 patch kit
3 tyre levers
1 pair disposable gloves
1 rag
1 $10 note

On bike:
1 pump


A mobile phone is also useful should you have a major problem.
User avatar
cjrich
 
Posts: 554
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2008 8:24 am
Location: Central Coast NSW

Postby Kalgrm » Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:45 pm

gsxrboy wrote:Until you puncture all the tubes in one ride ! Get a little $2-3 repair kit as a backup backup :D

If you don't ride in the rain too often, the self adhesive patches might be a good option. Apparently they don't stick well on tubes which are still wet when you are trying to patch the tube. It would be a bugger to get a third flat on a rainy day. :cry:
Think outside the double triangle.
---------------------------------------
My web site: www.scenebyhird.com
---------------------------------------
The Bicycle Transportation Alliance
User avatar
Kalgrm
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 9236
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 5:21 pm
Location: Spearwood, 9km SE of Fremantle, WA

Postby zoom bean » Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:51 pm

cjrich wrote:
jasimon wrote:I also have a pair of disposable gloves in my kit. My hands get really dirty changing a tyre - especially if it is the back one and I get grease from the chain on my hands - and the gloves deal with that problem. I have a rag for a similar reason.

In seatbag:
1 tube
1 patch kit
3 tyre levers
1 pair disposable gloves
1 rag
1 $10 note

On bike:
1 pump


A mobile phone is also useful should you have a major problem.

I'd also add a little multi-tool kit to tighten anything that may come loose along the way. I can remember how much of a pain it was to try and ride home after my seat came loose once. The last 20kms riding out of the saddle took some effort.

I guess you learn as you go what is important to have on board with you to fix any little mishaps. But yeah usually the first thing to go wrong is the flat so it is good to have all the above as you will probably need that first.
User avatar
zoom bean
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 7:14 pm
Location: Cronulla, NSW

Postby Aushiker » Fri Jul 18, 2008 1:42 pm

j.r.hawkins wrote:I'd only bother with two tubes on longer off-road rides. For my home-to-CBD-and-back commuting one, does me fine.

I wouldn't agree with that all. There is no reason why a puncture couldn't happen down the road. Last night ... three punctures on a 26 km ride and I walked.

I always carry two tubes unless my ride is within a reasonable walking distance of home/bike shop/work.

Andrew
"Pedal-pounding pounce" - D. Fluellen - West Australian 13/1/14
Image
User avatar
Aushiker
 
Posts: 19935
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA

Postby Aushiker » Fri Jul 18, 2008 1:43 pm

Kalgrm wrote:
gsxrboy wrote:Until you puncture all the tubes in one ride ! Get a little $2-3 repair kit as a backup backup :D

It would be a bugger to get a third flat on a rainy day. :cry:

Tell me about it ... last night, pissing down, three punctures => one walk.

Andrew
"Pedal-pounding pounce" - D. Fluellen - West Australian 13/1/14
Image
User avatar
Aushiker
 
Posts: 19935
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA

Postby RainForeverRain » Fri Jul 18, 2008 2:17 pm

I also carry a mini phillips screwdriver plus five allen keys that together cover everything that I have had to adjust on the bike so far (brakes, saddle, pedals, handlebars, etc.)
Last edited by RainForeverRain on Fri Jul 18, 2008 2:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Cell Team 2008 mod to flat bar.
User avatar
RainForeverRain
 
Posts: 187
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 2:32 pm
Location: Sydney, Inner West

Postby gsxrboy » Fri Jul 18, 2008 2:19 pm

Sorry to hear that,

but !

my disaster theory is proven !


:D :D :D
gsxrboy
 
Posts: 569
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2007 12:19 pm
Location: Perth

Re: Being prepared

Postby MJF » Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:40 pm

r2160 wrote:Am I missing something here? I just want to be prepared just in case.

cheers
Glenn


As other have said, a puncture repair kit as well (just in case), and I'd pack a few pairs of disposable gloves rather than just one.
MJF
 
Posts: 972
Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 8:18 pm

Postby r2160 » Fri Jul 18, 2008 4:31 pm

Well I took everybodies advice :-)

I got three tyre levers, a puncture repair kit, organised a $10 note, always carry a phone and popped the two tubes into my little under-seat bag.

Hopefully I wont have to use them too soon!

All up $32 (+ the $10)

Already clocked up 100kms this week on the new bike and cut 5 mins from the trip time to work (and its still faster than driving the car). If only my legs would stop hurting lol.

cheers
Glenn
-----------
"Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever" Lance Armstrong
r2160
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 4:01 pm
Location: Bass Hill, NSW

Postby simonn » Fri Jul 18, 2008 5:08 pm

It is also a good idea to keep a few spare tubes at home (and work if commuting) to replenish the on-bike spares without having to go to a bike shop (or to take advantage of online deals . :twisted:).
Image
User avatar
simonn
 
Posts: 3575
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Sydney

Postby Mulger bill » Sat Jul 19, 2008 2:46 am

r2160 wrote:...If only my legs would stop hurting lol.

cheers
Glenn


Don't worry mate, they will.
Then you'll wanna go faster and make 'em hurt again :wink:

Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25548
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby Aushiker » Sat Jul 19, 2008 9:57 am

r2160 wrote:Already clocked up 100kms this week on the new bike and cut 5 mins from the trip time to work (and its still faster than driving the car). If only my legs would stop hurting lol.


Well done Glenn. I suggest you keep an eye on Torpedo 7 for their tubes special. You can get a pack of 10 delivered for around $3.00 a tube.

Andrew
"Pedal-pounding pounce" - D. Fluellen - West Australian 13/1/14
Image
User avatar
Aushiker
 
Posts: 19935
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA

Postby ausdb » Sat Jul 19, 2008 11:14 am

A chainbreaker as part of a compact tool can be very handy as well, my wife to be bought me a Ritchey compact rescue tool about 12 years ago and it is always in my kit road or mtb. I have used it a few times over the years but amazingly enough never on my own bike. It's always been to get a mates bike going whilst we are out on a ride. The last time I used it was after a mate had managed to shift his deraillueur into the wheel of his less than a week old Amiata roadie (TBE in Perth house brand) after he had dropped it and not realised his derailueur hanger was bent.

Just using that tool I removed his derailleuer so he could put it in his jersey, asked him what gear he like best and turned his racer into a temporary single speed which mean't he wasn't walking home.
ausdb
 
Posts: 305
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 4:11 pm
Location: Dianella WA

Postby Hawkeye » Sat Jul 19, 2008 7:51 pm

Aushiker wrote: Last night ... three punctures on a 26 km ride and I walked.


No patch kit? :shock:

I've had that happen too, but used the patch kit.

Toodling around with my son tonight on the dually I picked up a drawing pin in the front tyre. It was quicker to pull out a section and patch the tube than pull out the whole thing and replace.

I only use the spare tube if the original is trashed or I can't find the hole.

I don't have enough room for two tubes in the under saddle bag I use on the commuter in any case.
Hawkeye
 

Postby zozza » Sat Jul 19, 2008 7:56 pm

I got a pair of tweezers in my kit for removing fine bits of wire and glass from my tyres :idea:
User avatar
zozza
 
Posts: 4028
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:58 pm

Postby Aushiker » Sat Jul 19, 2008 8:02 pm

j.r.hawkins wrote:
Aushiker wrote: Last night ... three punctures on a 26 km ride and I walked.


No patch kit? :shock:


I carry a patch kit, just didn't use it. Given I can walk 1 km in about 10 minutes it was hardly worth it, plus it was night (see your quote above) and pissing down with rain (see Black Cat thread) .... if you can patch a wet tube in the dark good on you ... I couldn't be bothered. That is also assuming I could have found the hole in the first place. I find this hard in good conditions, net alone in the dark, when cold and wet.

Regards
Andrew :
"Pedal-pounding pounce" - D. Fluellen - West Australian 13/1/14
Image
User avatar
Aushiker
 
Posts: 19935
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA

Postby zozza » Sat Jul 19, 2008 8:26 pm

Hehe..same as my last puncture..a couple of K's from home and dark'n'wet..I couldn't be frigged fixin it and walked home :lol:
User avatar
zozza
 
Posts: 4028
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:58 pm

Postby wombatK » Sun Jul 20, 2008 9:46 pm

zozza wrote:I got a pair of tweezers in my kit for removing fine bits of wire and glass from my tyres :idea:


+1 for the tweezers. Fingers are pretty useless on fine wire.

Rain protection for your mobile is also essential - I use a zip-lock bag. Water is the foremost natural enemy of the mobile phone, and sweat is a close second.

-1 for self-adhesive pads. They just can't hold 100 psi pressure - might get you home, then you'll have to unpatch and repatch them (messy).

WombatK
====================
inch by inch, life's a cinch.
yard by yard it's very hard...
====================
User avatar
wombatK
 
Posts: 5188
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:08 pm
Location: Yagoona, AU

Next

Return to The Shed

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot]



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter