OT, maybe - inducing friction?

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OT, maybe - inducing friction?

Postby Jean » Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:40 pm

Hi,

This is OT for bikes but not for the shed I think.

I have a spindle that should work within its housing with some friction but it has lost its mojo and the joint is all floppy. Does anyone know of some sort of commonly available grease like compound (short of glue) designed to induce friction rather than reduce it?

Cheers
Jean
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by BNA » Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:32 pm

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Postby nzdans » Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:32 pm

I guess it depends how much resistance you require.

I play with toy cars a fair bit and have some silicone diff "fluid" that is rated at 120,000wt. I don't think the measure is an exaggeration as it is like a cross between glue and honey and practically locks up the diffs on my 1/8 scale monster truck- very viscous indeed!!
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Postby Hawkeye » Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:34 pm

What's the application? More detail please. :D
Last edited by Hawkeye on Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Hawkeye » Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:38 pm

nzdans wrote:I guess it depends how much resistance you require.

I play with toy cars a fair bit and have some silicone diff "fluid" that is rated at 120,000wt. I don't think the measure is an exaggeration as it is like a cross between glue and honey and practically locks up the diffs on my 1/8 scale monster truck- very viscous indeed!!

I never raced those things in anger (I was an on-road only kinda guy) but did a few 1/8 nitro buggy reviews for mags like "Racing Lines" (awhile ago now) - you're right about that diff "fluid" :lol: :lol:
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Postby Jean » Sat Aug 02, 2008 9:23 pm

It's for the sun visor in my car. It's been drooping and Mazda want and arm and a leg (well a wrist and an elbow) for new one (even wreckers want a fair bit). I pulled it out today and the visor has a spindle which supports it and also provides the friction to hold it up. The spindle doesn't seem worn but there is the residue of some black goop which I suspect was what really kept it up. So I'm looking for some equivalent black goop to save myself a fair whack in Mazda genuine parts!

So the application is not heavy duty but the substance does need to be gooey enough to hold your typical car visor up.
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Postby mikeg » Sat Aug 02, 2008 10:13 pm

What is the difference in fit. A thin plastic or nylon sleeve might be what you need. Have you compared it with the other side visor?
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Postby MountGower » Sun Aug 03, 2008 9:31 am

Can this spindle be removed? If so, can it be knurled? You can do this simply by using a centre punch. When the punch goes in it causes high spots around the punch centre. A few of these at random may do the trick.
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Postby Jean » Sun Aug 03, 2008 9:36 am

mikeg wrote:What is the difference in fit. A thin plastic or nylon sleeve might be what you need. Have you compared it with the other side visor?


I tried some electrical tape last night, but that just got torn up when I tried to reinsert the spindle. I then tried plumber's thread tape and that has partially worked - it sags less, but it still sags and that stuff is not going to be durable enough to last for long.

Knurling might work, though whacking the plastic spindle with a punch might be test it to destruction. S'pose I could rough it up as a starting point?

Cheers
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Postby MountGower » Sun Aug 03, 2008 9:40 am

Ah, plastic. If you had a steady hand and a small drill bit, you could drill it length ways and push someting like a small clout down the hole to spread the spindle without splitting it. Measure the clout (or what ever) first to sligthly undersize the hole. Perhaps drill straight through (from the side), trimming the insert short of flush to create the high spot. Could be harder than it sounds. Good luck.
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Postby mikeg » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:08 am

Try heat shrinking some heat-shrink tube onto it.
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Postby MountGower » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:32 am

You could also mix a small amount of two part epoxy resin (available from a hardware) and paint a very thin layer on the spindle and allow to dry for 24hrs.
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Postby Parrott » Sun Aug 03, 2008 9:07 pm

Some good Aussie bush engineering suggestions here, updated for the plastic age :) . Is a good read.
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Postby Hawkeye » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:23 pm

Jean wrote:So the application is not heavy duty but the substance does need to be gooey enough to hold your typical car visor up.

Well, I reckon nzdan's suggestion might be on the money. The good thing about that silicon R/C gas buggy diff goop was that its viscosity changes very little regardless of whether it is hot or cold.

With the temperatures you can get inside a car on a hot day that might be a worthwhile attribute.
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