Life of carbon frames

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AUbicycles
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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby AUbicycles » Thu Feb 08, 2018 6:16 pm

UV is just one aspect and I not that made that it keeps me up at night :)

My message is fairly basic, a lot of ground has been made in carbon fiber bike manufacture in the last 20 years so a carbon fiber bike you buy today will be better value and and likely have superior engineering and production compared to a mass produced bike of the past.

For riders, you get a lot of bang for your buck in the $1.000 - 2.500 price rage for carbon fiber bikes.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby Kronos » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:12 am

A lot of ground has been made, some of it is fairly inconsequential to be honest. It's nice to keep saying you must keep upgrading your carbon bikes as they become "more aero" or whatever... We're in the same process of thinking that led to "speed holes" on steel bikes otherwise known as drillium during the 1970s and 1980s.

A lot of it does not matter to figure a point, I'm running a 10 speed Ultegra groupset on my aluminum bike from 2007 at the moment, it has 99% of the gearing options available that most pro riders would use. You can still by Ultegra 6700 parts off the shelf if you really want them. My aluminum bike weighs 8.5-9kg, I can ride it today exactly the same as I would ride an entry to mid level 8.5-9kg carbon bike. A lighter bike will not make the average person faster and won't matter a thing until you are riding as an A grade rider, or are on a Continental European team http://www.velonews.com/2014/08/news/bi ... kes_339880

Really... A lot of people enjoy pissing thousands of dollars into the wind for a bike that wont actually make them significantly faster in any sense. Meanwhile they don't factor in the amount of time they're spending training to make themselves faster either. It's an ego thing I guess... But most people are getting ripped off buying shiny new bikes. There is no such thing as a fast bike, or a slow bike, the laws of gravity keep your bike held in one place until you start turning the cranks over. Some people out there will be more proficient at doing that then others.

We live in a world where time is money, but people want to incessantly upgrade their bikes. Your time is worth more than that. I realised this fact and now I buy cool old bikes that everyone else thinks are arse. It's not my point to tell you not to buy carbon bikes but when you see people spend 10s of thousands of dollars on more expensive carbon bikes and parts it really makes you think. My currently newest bike was a $2000 bike 10 years ago I bought it for $300 10 years later. It's like taking your hard earned money and setting it on fire.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby AUbicycles » Fri Feb 09, 2018 8:37 pm

Why buy a $40K car when an $18K car has 90% of the more expensive one and serves exactly the same primary function?

Even your Ultegra 6700 (which I still ride as well) benefitted from trickle-down from Dura Ace and took over all of the good attributes and left out a lot of things that gave marginal returns. But why Ultgra when you can go 105 or lower for less?

It is the nature of the market to push consumers to buy new gear and in my view, being a critical or thoughtful consumer is the solution.

Although a sports bikes (e.g. road, MTB) is presented with the retail value typically tied to the apparent performance, for the individual who saves up and rewards themself with a nice bike or gear, their return on value is often not a practical performance advantage - rather it is an emotional return. They may be motivated to ride more so get joy and health benefits.

Returning to the thread - the market it producing carbon fiber bikes and wants riders to buy more frequently. I feel that active sports riders are encouraged to upgrade every few years but when the gear is running well - it is not necessary to upgrade that frequently.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby Kronos » Fri Feb 09, 2018 8:53 pm

My point is the same as yours. Buy a carbon bike if you really want one (it's not my money). But when you have a bike that runs well and ticks all the boxes maybe you should actually stop to consider whether you need a bike now, or in 10 years time. That is of course unless you need that sort of equipment, but by then you may be sponsored either locally, nationally or internationally by a company to ride said bike if you're good enough to make use of that new carbon bike.

Even if you're not that good you might end up like my brother as a knowledgeable bike mechanic and B grade racer, for one of the larger distributors in Australia and get to ride that bike for free as a perk of your job.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby Comedian » Mon Feb 12, 2018 2:17 pm

Kronos wrote:My point is the same as yours. Buy a carbon bike if you really want one (it's not my money). But when you have a bike that runs well and ticks all the boxes maybe you should actually stop to consider whether you need a bike now, or in 10 years time. That is of course unless you need that sort of equipment, but by then you may be sponsored either locally, nationally or internationally by a company to ride said bike if you're good enough to make use of that new carbon bike.

Even if you're not that good you might end up like my brother as a knowledgeable bike mechanic and B grade racer, for one of the larger distributors in Australia and get to ride that bike for free as a perk of your job.

In the latest cycling tips podcast they made an interesting observation. Despite the fact that they all made a living by testing carbon fibre bikes, the entire editorial staff rode titanium bikes as their personal bikes. Personally I understand where they are coming from :mrgreen:

I exclusively ride titanium bikes because they ride well, and are light and tough. As far as I can tell, they are as fast or faster than any carbon bike I've owned. I like nice things and carbon bikes fragility would upset me. Sooner or later something would happen. Each of my ti bikes have lived through events that would have damaged carbon bikes.

Early on when I was speaking to people with ti bikes.. one guy said "titanium bikes aren't for you if you like buying a new bike every two years". Last time I spoke with him he'd shouted his bike a new groupset at 80k and it was still going strong. If you buy a ti bike, in most cases you'll literally have it forever.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby P!N20 » Mon Feb 12, 2018 2:47 pm

Comedian wrote:If you buy a ti bike, in most cases you'll literally have it forever.


Will it fit in your coffin?

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby baabaa » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:02 pm

If so guessing that ti coffins will be the next big thing.

But yes I have three steel frame in true temper OX platinum and as it works for me, wont sell them. I also don't try that hard to break them 'cause they they just dont make them anymore.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby P!N20 » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:22 pm

baabaa wrote:If so guessing that ti coffins will be the next big thing.


Takes a fair bit to get the suckers to melt, too.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby Kronos » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:51 pm

It's always he case of N+1. I've had carbon, steel, and aluminum, I haven't tried titanium yet but its definitely on my list of things to try.

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Re: Life of carbon frames

Postby outnabike » Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:33 pm

I do so like the honesty of these posts.
What put me off carbon was that when buying my bike, a lot of recalls were to do with fork problems, and chains lacerating the chain stays.
I considered the points on speed and how much faster an old fella would be with saddle bags full of veggies etc. Mud guards and racing frames don't go together that well either.
So here I am back on a steel frame similar to what I had as a boy..... Ahh, but now I reminisce :)
Vivente World Randonneur complete with panniers

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