Fear of TT bars

bianchi928
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Fear of TT bars

Postby bianchi928 » Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:20 pm

I recently crashed when doing a time trial, losing a fair bit of skin of my body, including my face, as well as bruising and potentially cracked ribs.
I was riding a road bike with clip on bars.

In hindsight, I think I was on the clip on bars through a tight/technical section and overcooked the corner. I can't remember exactly as it happened pretty quickly and suddenly I was sliding along the ground. I think it was rookie error and I need more practice.

I still want to keep doing time trials, however thoughts of buying a TT bike or just using TT bars concern me, because, in short, I am now "spooked" regarding the use of TT bars and being away from the brakes. So much I am considering sticking with my roadie without the clip ons.

I have never ridden a TT bike and I don't know enough about the different handling of a roadie with the clip on bars versus a TT bike ie. is a TT bike more stable because it's designed to have the bar extensions.

Has anyone had experience of using both options and can offer any feedback or has anyone decked it and can offer inspiration.

Cheers and thanks.
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bianchi928
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Fear of TT bars.

Postby bianchi928 » Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:27 pm

Hi, I also posted this in the TT section.

I recently crashed when doing a time trial, losing a fair bit of skin of my body, including my face, as well as bruising and potentially cracked ribs.
I was riding a road bike with clip on bars.

In hindsight, I think I was on the clip on bars through a tight/technical section and overcooked the corner. I can't remember exactly as it happened pretty quickly and suddenly I was sliding along the ground. I think it was rookie error and I need more practice.

I still want to keep doing time trials, however thoughts of buying a TT bike or just using TT bars concern me, because, in short, I am now "spooked" regarding the use of TT bars and being away from the brakes. So much I am considering sticking with my roadie without the clip ons.

I have never ridden a TT bike and I don't know enough about the different handling of a roadie with the clip on bars versus a TT bike ie. is a TT bike more stable because it's designed to have the bar extensions.

Has anyone had experience of using both options and can offer any feedback or has anyone decked it and can offer inspiration.

Cheers and thanks.
Stand on my dog I cut off your head

Gunlock
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Re: Fear of TT bars.

Postby Gunlock » Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:44 pm

If you really want to have brakes to hand on the extensions you can buy a particular kind (Cant remember who it is, sorry) of shifter that has brakes and shifter in one. Like di2 it only changes the rear cassette but thats all you need i guess.
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nickobec
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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby nickobec » Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:55 pm

I have only ridden a road bike with clip ons a couple of times, but have put in over 7000km on my TT bike including decking it twice.

1st time was 1st or 2nd race, howling crosswind, I over corrected, ended up on the gravel verge, made a split second decision to use the conveniently placed pile of sand to one side of the road for a soft but filthly landing. Only hurt my pride and still get ribbed about it.

12 months later, pushing hard with tailwind my rear tyre went (or more precisely my inner tube was rubbing against a shard or carbon from my cheap chinese rim and let go fast). Heading for a chainlink fence, I attempted to counter steer and down I went and smashed my collar bone.

My first off, was my mistake. If it was today, I would just keep on going on the gravel till I way slow enough to swap from TT to base bar and bunny hop back on the road. It is all to do with confidence and you do get it back quickly.

The second was one of those things, probably a little more aware of what a rapidly deflating rear tyre is like, might not get a different result though.

The more I ride, the more I push, I gain in confidence. I still take a few corners on my training/commute ride on the base bar, but getting there.

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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby mikesbytes » Fri Mar 11, 2016 8:26 pm

[Mod] I've merged the topics[/Mod]
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby mikesbytes » Fri Mar 11, 2016 8:28 pm

I guess its simply a matter of practice. I've hit 80kph in the clips and I've gone out in massive winds with a disc rear wheel and a deep dish front wheel.

Learn to ride the bike with your body weight and the hands on the front end have less to do.
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Strawburger
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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby Strawburger » Fri Mar 11, 2016 8:54 pm

TT bike is better I reckon, better aero gains, but also more comfortable. You just need to relax on the bars and get some time in the tuck, that will sort you out.
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Mjainoz
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Fear of TT bars

Postby Mjainoz » Fri Mar 11, 2016 9:33 pm

mikesbytes wrote:I
Learn to ride the bike with your body weight and the hands on the front end ....

This.
Commit, hunker down and be stable. Close thread.

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nickobec
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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby nickobec » Wed Mar 16, 2016 5:13 pm

As I said before it is all confidence. I have no sense of balance, if I take my hands off the bars on a roadie I will crash. I am a little nervous cornering particularly in crits and road races. But on TT bike in straight line, no worries. My training ride (aka commute) today did 25 minute threshold interval on PSP, with roaring tail/crosswind, hands went of the base bars passing two slow riders and one corner. And other than changing gears and a couple of sweepers, by hands did not touch the TT bars either. I rested my arms on them with my hands flopped over the levers or with hands clasped. It is all practice and confidence.

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foo on patrol
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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby foo on patrol » Fri Mar 18, 2016 6:08 pm

I'd never used them till about 5wks ago and from my perspective, they are not that hard to get used to. :? (I'm 58yrs old) Don't get on them in cross winds, bunches, high speed corners or rough roads. :idea:

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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby g-boaf » Wed Jan 11, 2017 6:11 pm

foo on patrol wrote:I'd never used them till about 5wks ago and from my perspective, they are not that hard to get used to. :? (I'm 58yrs old) Don't get on them in cross winds, bunches, high speed corners or rough roads. :idea:

Foo



These are good tips. Absolutely on rough roads I won't use the aerobars, they just don't give enough control in those situations.

The control does come from your body, so I guess lots of core workouts would be great. Doing lits of transitions from aero bars to base bars to make it absolutely first nature is good too. Just do that at lower speeds.

More time on the bike helps a lot too. It doesn't get any easier though - still just as hard, you just go better (hopefully).

I ditched the very deep front wheels for some lower profile ones. Didn't affect the speed, but it did reduce those unpleasant crosswind effects by a lot.

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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby marc2131 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:00 am

I've only started using TT bars for about 18months or so. Took me around 2 months to get use to them (only did weekend rides).
Suggest you find a nice uninterrupted road. Here in Sydney, the Centennial Park circuit is perfect for this. No need to worry about cars. Geese and swans are another matter.
Don't push too hard at your first go. Just move onto them if you feel okay. Move back to the drops if you feel wary. I use to do 'half aeros' in the past when in doubt. One hand on the drops and another on one aero bar. Gave me the confidence to go full aero later on. Make it up as you go along. Don't worry what others say. My mates use to laugh at me when I did my half aero thing.
Watch lots of youtube videos on aero bike fitting. Will give you an idea of how to position yourself.
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Re: Fear of TT bars

Postby g-boaf » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:17 pm

marc2131 wrote:I've only started using TT bars for about 18months or so. Took me around 2 months to get use to them (only did weekend rides).
Suggest you find a nice uninterrupted road. Here in Sydney, the Centennial Park circuit is perfect for this. No need to worry about cars. Geese and swans are another matter.
Don't push too hard at your first go. Just move onto them if you feel okay. Move back to the drops if you feel wary. I use to do 'half aeros' in the past when in doubt. One hand on the drops and another on one aero bar. Gave me the confidence to go full aero later on. Make it up as you go along. Don't worry what others say. My mates use to laugh at me when I did my half aero thing.
Watch lots of youtube videos on aero bike fitting. Will give you an idea of how to position yourself.
marc



Would recommend against Centennial park, if the complaints I've heard about are anything to go by. The best option might be a quiet industrial area on the weekend at a time when there are no cars or trucks around. And no side streets or interruptions. Otherwise, one of the flatter outdoor velodromes with very gentle banking would be good too, because you've got no interruptions at all.

I also second the advice on not pushing too hard. I think you just step up the pace gradually and get used to it.

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