Carry stuff to get you out of trouble!

Beating the system - the cycling commuting section

Postby munga » Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:00 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:Yeah, gotta watch those pumps! On Tues arvo, mine fell off and lodged in between my small front chainring and my my frame. Lucky I was crawling up a hill at walking speed at the time it happened coz I would have hated for it to happen at speed :oops:


is the bike ok? 8)
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by BNA » Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:53 pm

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Postby casual_cyclist » Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:53 pm

munga wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:Yeah, gotta watch those pumps! On Tues arvo, mine fell off and lodged in between my small front chainring and my my frame. Lucky I was crawling up a hill at walking speed at the time it happened coz I would have hated for it to happen at speed :oops:


is the bike ok? 8)


Yeah, its cool. Just another gotcha for the n00bs. It didn't actually jam, but it gave me a fright and some amusement for the passers by. :oops: :oops: :oops:
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Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:24 pm

greggie-e wrote:Sooooo

tyre levers, a pump, some patches etc, spare tube and some money.
All tucked up into the little bum bag?

the pump may have to be attached to the frame...


Does it matter what kind of repair kit I get? I saw some with patches and tyre levers for $8 in KMart last night and was wondering if the quality matters at all. I would hate to have a flat tyre far from home only to have my brand new Kmart tyre lever snap in half!
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Postby Kalgrm » Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:37 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:Does it matter what kind of repair kit I get? I saw some with patches and tyre levers for $8 in KMart last night and was wondering if the quality matters at all. I would hate to have a flat tyre far from home only to have my brand new Kmart tyre lever snap in half!

It's worth getting good quality levers.

Patch kits are pretty much the same regardless of brand. The problem will arise when you open a tube of glue then put it away for some time - the glue will dry and you'll end up without a way to patch your tubes. It's a good idea to carry unopened tubes of glue whenever you can.

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Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:13 pm

Kalgrm wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:Does it matter what kind of repair kit I get? I saw some with patches and tyre levers for $8 in KMart last night and was wondering if the quality matters at all. I would hate to have a flat tyre far from home only to have my brand new Kmart tyre lever snap in half!

It's worth getting good quality levers.

Patch kits are pretty much the same regardless of brand. The problem will arise when you open a tube of glue then put it away for some time - the glue will dry and you'll end up without a way to patch your tubes. It's a good idea to carry unopened tubes of glue whenever you can.

Cheers,
Graeme


Will check out the LBS on the W/E

Cheers
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Postby gavinr » Fri Mar 06, 2009 7:57 am

Got a puncture on the way home last night, fortunately only about 5 mins from home so I was able to push the bike back. I had been assembling a kit to carry with me so that I could deal with such an emergency so I had most of what I needed to get back on the road.

One thing I am missing is a small pump to carry on the bike (hopefully staying on there and not dropping off :) ), anyone care to recommend a good one?
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Postby m@ » Fri Mar 06, 2009 8:52 am

gavinr wrote:Got a puncture on the way home last night, fortunately only about 5 mins from home so I was able to push the bike back. I had been assembling a kit to carry with me so that I could deal with such an emergency so I had most of what I needed to get back on the road.

One thing I am missing is a small pump to carry on the bike (hopefully staying on there and not dropping off :) ), anyone care to recommend a good one?

I have one of these; a bit pricey but is light, looks good and works.
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Postby simonn » Fri Mar 06, 2009 9:06 am

gavinr wrote:One thing I am missing is a small pump to carry on the bike (hopefully staying on there and not dropping off :) ), anyone care to recommend a good one?


What do you ride? IMHO, if you need to get tire pressure above 80psi (or even if you don't), get a mini floor pump e.g Serfas Grifter which I have.

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Topeak make a similar one.

Much quicker and less likely to damage the valve.
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Postby il padrone » Fri Mar 06, 2009 11:02 am

I've always carried one of these:

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Great to get the pressure up quickly and a secure frame fit. Better to get the hpx2, 3 or 4, the hp1 is really too small to get good volume in. The hpx pumps are best on larger frames - don't work so well trying to fit to modern 'compact' frames, nor to all the plastic bikes :wink:
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Postby Earthy Ochre Man » Fri Mar 06, 2009 11:15 am

I always carry a pump, multi-tool, spare tube, tube levers and tube repair kit.
I have often got a couple muesli bars in one of the panniers also.
As I am normally on call, on the bigger rides I carry a pad and pen also.

I hate being unprepared!
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Postby DionM » Sun Mar 08, 2009 4:49 pm

I carry a spare tube.

Pulled it out of my bag the other day - hole completely worn thru the side of it from being in the bag for a couple of years. Fat lot of good that would be :lol:
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Postby Pax » Sun Mar 08, 2009 5:03 pm

DionM wrote:I carry a spare tube.

Pulled it out of my bag the other day - hole completely worn thru the side of it from being in the bag for a couple of years. Fat lot of good that would be :lol:


Ahhh yes, a lesson you only need once. Warp it in a light rag to protect it and place your other tools in such a way that nothing too pointy is rubbing against the tube.
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Postby Aushiker » Sun Mar 08, 2009 7:21 pm

DionM wrote:I carry a spare tube.

Pulled it out of my bag the other day - hole completely worn thru the side of it from being in the bag for a couple of years. Fat lot of good that would be :lol:


Which is why I carry two tubes, well one of the reasons :)

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Postby heavymetal » Sun Mar 08, 2009 7:34 pm

I carry 3 metal tyre levers, 2 spare tubes, spare rack bolts, a puncture repair kit, multitool, and a spare pump. I had a pump self destruct once. The spare pump is a small one. Luckily I have the third cage mount that wont take a water bottle, but I found out that it's for the tool cage and container.

One thing I do carry that is unusual is a small plastic zip lock bag. I put enough water (about 5 mouthfuls) in it so I can slide the tube through it bit by bit until I find the hole. Usually the holes are hard to find unless you are in a very quiet area.

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Forget the patches - take a tube

Postby Thoglette » Mon Mar 09, 2009 8:58 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:Does it matter what kind of repair kit I get? I saw some with patches and tyre levers for $8 in KMart last night and was wondering if the quality matters at all. I would hate to have a flat tyre far from home only to have my brand new Kmart tyre lever snap in half!


Forget the patch kit - you need a new (or repaired) tube, tyre levers (anything will do, even an old spoon), a way to get your wheels on and off and a decent pump.

And something to wipe your hands with - KFC wipes work well, plus a bit of rag.

And practice - seriously, sit on the porch on a lazy afternoon and try. You'll learn a lot.
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Postby ColinOldnCranky » Thu Mar 19, 2009 3:24 pm

KMart tyre levers and such are fine. There are better designs and better materials but, with care, they are OK. In fifty years of cycling I have NEVER pinched a tyre with a lever, cheap or not so cheap, or even with kitchen forks when I've had to.

However, it is also good to get someone to show you how to change a tube without a lever - some tyres and some rims it works for, it is quick and it is max safe.

About the only on-the-road repair I ever had trouble with were broken spokes, probably around three or four times. With those you gotta get home before you can do anything useful. Oh, and also once when a wheel was taken out of shape when avoiding some hoons by going over a sharp curb.

It's worth being prepared as it's a bugger trying to get home in cleated shoes and panniers and all. But these days maybe all you need is a cooperative mate on the other end of a mobile phone.
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Postby casual_cyclist » Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:21 pm

Based on everyone's good advice I have been carrying around tools, spare tube and a patch kit in case of a flat except on Wednesday morning I cleaned out my backpack and forgot to put the patch kit back in...

Of course I got my first flat on the way home on Wednesday arvo. Glass. My back tyre is fairly warn and the rubber is perishing, so I was really surprised when I pulled the tube out of it to find it was pristine. It is now sporting its first patch - a Slime Skabs patch. It is holding up so far. I'll let you know how it goes.

moral of the story. If you forget your patch kit, you're bound to get a flat...
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Postby hartleymartin » Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:49 pm

moral of the story. If you forget your patch kit, you're bound to get a flat...


Don't I know it! On Tuesday I got a nail stuck into my tyre - I doubt I ran over it - it looks suspiciously like someone drove it in whilst my bicycle was parked for the day. I pumped it up to about 30 psi, but I found that only 2 km's away it was totally flat. Worse still it had gone all the way through and punctured the other side of the tube. RATS! the day I don't have a patch kit is the day I get a catastrophic flat! I had to pedal home with a flat front wheel, most of the way in granny gear, then go out on my other bicycle to get a tube of patch glue 7 patches latter (the nail managed to make a series of perforations), the tube will hold air. I got a new tube. When I get paid next week I'm buying two more spare tubes to carry with me.

I think that the best system would be to carry a spare tube. Patch the punctured one either at work (at lunch) or at home (after dinner), then put the patched tube back in. Keeping the unpatched tube as the spare is probably best, because Murphy's law states that when you go to put a patched tube in it will leak badly from not being patched properly in the first place!

Murphy's law got me on St Patrick's day too! How's THAT?
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Postby Thoglette » Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:38 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:Based on everyone's good advice I have been carrying around tools, spare tube and a patch kit in case of a flat except on Wednesday morning I cleaned out my backpack and forgot to put the patch kit back in...


That's what those funny underseat bags are for: spare tube; tyre levers; selection of allen keys; phillips head screwdriver; rag; KFC handwipe and a selection of bandages*.

Thog
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Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:09 pm

Thoglette wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:Based on everyone's good advice I have been carrying around tools, spare tube and a patch kit in case of a flat except on Wednesday morning I cleaned out my backpack and forgot to put the patch kit back in...


That's what those funny underseat bags are for: spare tube; tyre levers; selection of allen keys; phillips head screwdriver; rag; KFC handwipe and a selection of bandages*.

Thog
*the only thing more demoralising than a leaky tyre is a leaky me.


I know, I know. I have been looking at them but have not picked one up yet. Don't worry, it's a high priority now!
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Postby casual_cyclist » Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:55 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:It is now sporting its first patch - a Slime Skabs patch. It is holding up so far. I'll let you know how it goes.


Lasted about 50km and then failed halfway through the freeway bike hike. removed and replaced the patch with another skab. That one lasted about 35km before failing.

They are quick to apply and therefore good for a temporary fix. But if you have more than about 30km to get home don't bother.
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Postby sharktamin » Mon Mar 23, 2009 7:21 pm

Last week saw me towing the 2 wheel trailer to complete a rather large delivery. Having heeded the good advice of fellow posters I had taken with me tools, tube etc. On the return journey I found the going becoming more and more difficult and finally pulled up to see what gives.

I had totally lost one wheel nut, resulting in its mate coming loose and the wheel rubbing on the fork (home built trailer). I had all the tools but no spare nut! By tightening the one remaining I was able to go about 30m at a time before parking and retightening. I tried every business that sold nuts, but none had a fine enough thread.

Luckily I had passed some roadside collection piles on the outward journey where I found a couple of old kids bikes and liberated some wheel nuts! You never know where your spares will come from.
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Postby ajh_ausnzcf » Tue Mar 24, 2009 5:37 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:It is now sporting its first patch - a Slime Skabs patch. It is holding up so far. I'll let you know how it goes.


Lasted about 50km and then failed halfway through the freeway bike hike. removed and replaced the patch with another skab. That one lasted about 35km before failing.

They are quick to apply and therefore good for a temporary fix. But if you have more than about 30km to get home don't bother.


Those adhesive patches don't work well high pressure (>100 psi) setups. They often don't work at all if the puncture is in an uneven place on the tube. I've had about 4 already fail. What happens is the pressure pushes a small channel through. They work fine on my tourer with about 75psi.
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Postby Dial » Wed Mar 25, 2009 9:21 pm

You might want to add a headlight to the list for this time of year. Normally only need one in winter but I had to work back today and had to HTFU to get home before dark.

Also I don't worry about a pump, I just carry the CO2
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Re: Carry stuff to get you out of trouble!

Postby DaNmAn » Thu Apr 02, 2009 5:49 pm

Just on the subject of being prepared, I got some c02 cylinders to compliment my mini hand pump today.

I also got a new tube so I can take 2 out with me.

When I got home, I realised that it is a 700x35/43, mine uses a 700x32. Does this mean this tube is too big?

Also, I know the 700 stands for cubic centimeters of air in the tyre yeah ? but what does the 32 mean ?

Thanks in advance - Im a commuter newbie, used to just be 26x2 on the mtb
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