Indoor training

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Indoor training

Postby ICU812 » Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:21 pm

I sometimes do indoor training usually when the weather is not nice or don't have time. I do prefer to ride outside.

Just a few questions on indoor training. It seems a hell of lot harder on the trainer than it is doing training outside - why is this??

For a 40min session I've sweated a bucket full of sweat yet you don't sweat as much out side - I suppose the wind evaporates the sweat. What is the equivalent of an out side ride to 40 min inside??

There are plenty of DVD's out there - I do the easiest of the spinervals DVD. Most of them say difficulty of 8.5 and above. I'm just not up to killing myself yet :wink: Bathurst gets some unfavourable weather in winter and would like to try something a bit different that is not going to totally torture me - Mt Victoria was bad enough :shock:
I have one virtual reality DVD that I'm not overly fond of - it makes really dizzy and as the picture turns the corner, so do I and I almost fall off!! :lol:
Does anyone have some good ideas for DVD's??
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by BNA » Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:38 pm

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Re: Indoor training

Postby sogood » Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:38 pm

No wind... Get a fan.
No distraction... Watch TV/listen to music.
No freewheeling rest... The best training there is.

Suffer! :mrgreen:
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Re: Indoor training

Postby ICU812 » Thu Apr 02, 2009 2:01 pm

sogood wrote:No wind... Get a fan.
No distraction... Watch TV/listen to music.
No freewheeling rest... The best training there is.

Suffer! :mrgreen:


So that is what the little green man is - *the evil grin* :twisted:
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Re: Indoor training

Postby Nobody » Thu Apr 02, 2009 3:23 pm

Also get a cadence computer as they have a rear wheel sensor.
Get the best trainer you can afford as it will make the experience easier to suffer through.
Set a goal and keep written records of your progress.

I'm just about to get on the trainer myself. :(
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Re: Indoor training

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:42 pm

ICU812 wrote:I sometimes do indoor training usually when the weather is not nice or don't have time. I do prefer to ride outside.

Just a few questions on indoor training. It seems a hell of lot harder on the trainer than it is doing training outside - why is this??

Here's why.... and some thoughts on what you can do about it

http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com/2009/01/ ... ining.html
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Re: Indoor training

Postby Chuck » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:47 am

Alex Simmons/RST wrote:
ICU812 wrote:Here's why.... and some thoughts on what you can do about it

http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com/2009/01/ ... ining.html


Good read.

I'm returning from injury and have been using your "everyday" exercise bike because it didn't cost anything and I figure it's better than doing nothing.

You talk specifically about ergo bikes and trainers on your blog spot Alex, is there any place for a plain old exercise bike in training/rehab ?
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Re: Indoor training

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:59 am

Chuck wrote:
Alex Simmons/RST wrote:
ICU812 wrote:Here's why.... and some thoughts on what you can do about it

http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com/2009/01/ ... ining.html


Good read.

I'm returning from injury and have been using your "everyday" exercise bike because it didn't cost anything and I figure it's better than doing nothing.

You talk specifically about ergo bikes and trainers on your blog spot Alex, is there any place for a plain old exercise bike in training/rehab ?

Of course, just as there is any activity that helps to promote the healing and rebuilding of the body in prep for whatever you have in mind for it later.

I talked about dedicated bike trainers and ergos simply because that's what I was writing about and is what most of my "audience" in the world of training with power use.
Certainly the principles are the same with exercise bikes - inertial load, cooling, motivation and adaptation - still apply. The difference will be that there will be some additional adaptation required when going back to a normal bike/bike position.

Sometimes using an exercise bike might be better, particularly if injury means your position on a normal bike is not easily attainable. You can make adaptations to a normal bike set up though. e.g. I think of Anna Meares, when she first got on a trainer after breaking her neck, they rigged up a pole for her to hang onto because she could sit on a bike but couldn't bend over and put hands on the bars like normal.
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Re: Indoor training

Postby Chuck » Fri Apr 03, 2009 11:56 am

Alex Simmons/RST wrote:Of course, just as there is any activity that helps to promote the healing and rebuilding of the body in prep for whatever you have in mind for it later.

I talked about dedicated bike trainers and ergos simply because that's what I was writing about and is what most of my "audience" in the world of training with power use.
Certainly the principles are the same with exercise bikes - inertial load, cooling, motivation and adaptation - still apply. The difference will be that there will be some additional adaptation required when going back to a normal bike/bike position.

Sometimes using an exercise bike might be better, particularly if injury means your position on a normal bike is not easily attainable. You can make adaptations to a normal bike set up though. e.g. I think of Anna Meares, when she first got on a trainer after breaking her neck, they rigged up a pole for her to hang onto because she could sit on a bike but couldn't bend over and put hands on the bars like normal.


Thanks for taking the time to reply Alex.

It's a shame that some of us have to budget because I'm sure that power taps and ergos would be very beneficial, particularly with the right knowledge/guidance. An ergo trainer, particularly, would interest me because I have no problems re boredom and indoor training that others might have. I happily use some of the techniques that you mention in your blog Alex (music, cycling DVD's, yesterday it was O'Grady winning Paris-Roubaix-motivation was high). I also concede that I'm a little soft so winter brings with it some challenges that a good ergo setup (with the inclusions you mention, fan, space, DVD/music/computer/simulation) would really help with.

It would be nice to be able to do it on something that comes close to replicating the position on my roadie, oh well. Anyway thanks for reassuring me that what I'm doing is better than doing nothing. I know commonsense would tell me that anyway, but it's nice to have some input from someone who invests a fair bit of time and has good knowledge of this subject.

Cheers
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