Adding weight

heliage
Posts: 297
Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:39 pm
Location: NSW

Adding weight

Postby heliage » Thu May 07, 2009 8:45 pm

Alot of people are constantly trying to make the bike lighter to make a difference up a hill.

This is probably a stupid question, but, wouldn't adding weight to a bike, to say, go up a hill, and try to do it at the same speed as you go up it without the extra weight make you increase your power output overtime with training. Which if you then take weight off later for the same hill, your average power to keep the same speed would become smaller because of the reduced weight, thus making the hill that much easier to go up? (I'm new to this but I think I've got it right, the power to weight ratio would change significantly)

So big question I have is, would training with added weight do anything? or would it just be a waste of time? (not talking about adding a fwe hundred grams, but at least 10 kilos, or more to the weight.) I guess the other question would be, where would be the best place to put the extra 10 kilos? I was thinking under the seat post cause that'd probably be as if I just weighed more hence not changing too much to the steering.
Repeat the hill to hurt less.

Ant.
Posts: 758
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 9:34 am
Location: Perth

Re: Adding weight

Postby Ant. » Thu May 07, 2009 10:44 pm

heliage wrote:Alot of people are constantly trying to make the bike lighter to make a difference up a hill.

This is probably a stupid question, but, wouldn't adding weight to a bike, to say, go up a hill, and try to do it at the same speed as you go up it without the extra weight make you increase your power output overtime with training. Which if you then take weight off later for the same hill, your average power to keep the same speed would become smaller because of the reduced weight, thus making the hill that much easier to go up? (I'm new to this but I think I've got it right, the power to weight ratio would change significantly)

So big question I have is, would training with added weight do anything? or would it just be a waste of time? (not talking about adding a fwe hundred grams, but at least 10 kilos, or more to the weight.) I guess the other question would be, where would be the best place to put the extra 10 kilos? I was thinking under the seat post cause that'd probably be as if I just weighed more hence not changing too much to the steering.

You could add weight and it'd make the inclines harder, but how about just pedal harder up the hills :mrgreen: that works better.
Cervélo R3
Cervélo P3C
BT Blade

User avatar
Alex Simmons/RST
Expert
Posts: 4086
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 3:51 pm
Contact:

Re: Adding weight

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Fri May 08, 2009 12:41 am

Just ride faster.

User avatar
sogood
Posts: 17153
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU
Contact:

Re: Adding weight

Postby sogood » Fri May 08, 2009 7:04 am

Think of it this way. Weight is just another part of the combined resistance you are fighting against, along with speed when going up hills. More weight or speed equals greater resistance. So when going up hills at any given power, a heavier bike-rider combination will just have a slower speed. And if you want to put more resistance in the equation, then push to a faster speed.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.

ruscook
Posts: 2338
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2009 8:59 pm
Location: Tregear, NSW
Contact:

Re: Adding weight

Postby ruscook » Fri May 08, 2009 8:45 am

... or use a higher gear and try and keep the same cadence as a lower gear. The higher gearing will give more resistance.

I understand Heliage's point though, it's similar to some who train with a heavier bike with the same gear ratio's so they are "automatically" faster when on their race bike because they're carrying less weight when racing.

Russ
Image
GT Avalanche 1.0 | TCR Alliance 0 | Giant Bowery | BMW K1300R
Two wheels good, Four wheels bad

othy
Posts: 392
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:29 am
Location: Sydney

Re: Adding weight

Postby othy » Fri May 08, 2009 10:46 am

ruscook wrote:... or use a higher gear and try and keep the same cadence as a lower gear. The higher gearing will give more resistance.

I understand Heliage's point though, it's similar to some who train with a heavier bike with the same gear ratio's so they are "automatically" faster when on their race bike because they're carrying less weight when racing.

Russ



I ride all week with a backpack, but come the weekend race and bunch rides I definitely feel faster without it. I think it is a combination of the wind resistance, weight and extra comfort.

I don't want to be giving away all my secret training tips though. Sogood is watching.

User avatar
toolonglegs
Posts: 15451
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:49 pm
Location: Somewhere with padded walls and really big hills!

Re: Adding weight

Postby toolonglegs » Fri May 08, 2009 4:15 pm

othy wrote:
ruscook wrote:... or use a higher gear and try and keep the same cadence as a lower gear. The higher gearing will give more resistance.

I understand Heliage's point though, it's similar to some who train with a heavier bike with the same gear ratio's so they are "automatically" faster when on their race bike because they're carrying less weight when racing.

Russ



I ride all week with a backpack, but come the weekend race and bunch rides I definitely feel faster without it. I think it is a combination of the wind resistance, weight and extra comfort.

I don't want to be giving away all my secret training tips though. Sogood is watching.


If you didn't feel faster without there would be a problem.You are going faster without it...but only because your power to weight / aerodynamics has improved...you are still putting out the same watts.

User avatar
Alex Simmons/RST
Expert
Posts: 4086
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 3:51 pm
Contact:

Re: Adding weight

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Fri May 08, 2009 5:16 pm

ruscook wrote:... or use a higher gear and try and keep the same cadence as a lower gear.

Which means, ride faster.

ruscook wrote:I understand Heliage's point though, it's similar to some who train with a heavier bike with the same gear ratio's so they are "automatically" faster when on their race bike because they're carrying less weight when racing.

from a trainer POV, the only time it makes sense to add something to slow you down is if:
- you don't have a hill long enough for your hill repeats and you want to artificially lengthen it (in a time sense)
- you are riding with a slow partner but want to get a good workout

Otherwise, simply ride harder.

But adding a few kg to a bike won't make that big a difference to time up a climb. You'd need to ride with a trailer to really make a decent difference to climbing speed. Then you'll need appropriate gearing.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users