Physiology of power

The foundations for successful riding

Physiology of power

Postby PortableDave » Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:30 pm

Hi Guys,

Looking for literature on the physiology of power in cycling. Specifically information on muscle recruitment while cycling and recovery that leads to an increase in power. Can anyone recommmend any good sites/journals/books on this topic?
PortableDave
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 6:21 pm

by BNA » Sun Jan 10, 2010 12:09 am

BNA
 

Re: Physiology of power

Postby toolonglegs » Sun Jan 10, 2010 12:09 am

This is the bible and pretty much all you need.
http://www.amazon.com/Training-Racing-P ... 1931382794
Image
User avatar
toolonglegs
 
Posts: 14380
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:49 pm
Location: Somewhere with padded walls and really big hills!

Re: Physiology of power

Postby PortableDave » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:43 pm

Thanks TLL I will take a look.
PortableDave
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 6:21 pm

Re: Physiology of power

Postby toolonglegs » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:47 pm

Actually maybe I have gone off on a tangent...as I do.That is the bible for training with a powermeter...while it has very good examples it is not so much a training book.

I noticed this on Velonews yesterday so have downloaded it for a read...so I have no idea if it is any good or not.But may be interesting...it IS the full book and is free no strings attached.
http://www.cyclo-club.com/public/1176.c ... =tailwinds
Image
User avatar
toolonglegs
 
Posts: 14380
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:49 pm
Location: Somewhere with padded walls and really big hills!

Re: Physiology of power

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:09 am

PortableDave wrote:Hi Guys,

Looking for literature on the physiology of power in cycling. Specifically information on muscle recruitment while cycling and recovery that leads to an increase in power. Can anyone recommmend any good sites/journals/books on this topic?

It's not entirely clear to me what you are asking for.

Do you mean are there any journals that provide info on the science of cycling? If so, then a search on a given topic at PubMed will probably lead you to which journals may be of further interest. Sometimes Peak Performance have items of interest. Of course there are fundamental exercise physiology texts, such as by McArdle & Katch, or by Astrand & Rodahl.

Or books/references on training that leads to improved performance? then in that case then perhaps High Performance Cycling by Asker Jeukendrup, or high Tech Cycling by Ed Burke.
User avatar
Alex Simmons/RST
Expert
 
Posts: 3427
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 3:51 pm

Re: Physiology of power

Postby PortableDave » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:32 pm

Hi Alex,

I often hear "ride more to create power", "ride harder to create power". I am interested from a biological standpoint where this power is created and why it improves. "Exercise Physiology" from McArdle & Katch looks promising, I will see if I can get my hands on a copy. Thanks.
PortableDave
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 6:21 pm

Re: Physiology of power

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:53 pm

PortableDave wrote:Hi Alex,

I often hear "ride more to create power", "ride harder to create power". I am interested from a biological standpoint where this power is created and why it improves. "Exercise Physiology" from McArdle & Katch looks promising, I will see if I can get my hands on a copy. Thanks.

Physiological adaptations of most import to cycling performance are induced by training with sufficient intensity, duration and frequency. That's a pretty fundamental exercise training principle (training impulse and response). If you want a summary of the type of physiological adaptations elicited when cycling, then these following items summarise:

http://www.cyclecoach.com/index.php?opt ... Itemid=112
http://home.trainingpeaks.com/articles/ ... oggan.aspx

If you want to understand why/how these changes occur, then try the texts I referenced. But you may have to look even deeper.
User avatar
Alex Simmons/RST
Expert
 
Posts: 3427
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 3:51 pm

Re: Physiology of power

Postby PortableDave » Tue Jan 12, 2010 7:08 pm

Thanks Alex, I have a pretty good idea where to start now, this is purely out of academic interest not so much for my own training. Although knowledge is power as they say :p
PortableDave
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 6:21 pm

Re: Physiology of power

Postby ft_critical » Thu Jan 14, 2010 1:31 pm

PortableDave wrote:Hi Guys,

Looking for literature on the physiology of power in cycling. Specifically information on muscle recruitment while cycling and recovery that leads to an increase in power. Can anyone recommmend any good sites/journals/books on this topic?


I have asked my physio this same question as well as a few respected cycling figures. Everyone has read it as relating to power meters on this forum. But it is actually pedalling action related.
What I thought would be great would be a heat map of the body indicating which muscles were being recruited. I assumed that there would be different styles required for climbing (seated,) TT and say crit racing. But each of these would have an optimum muscle recruitment that could be mapped by the heat generated in each muscle. (Where you were underutilising a muscle, e.g., too much quad, then you would be told to reduce the length of drive on the front of pedal stroke [instead of 10 to 5, quad for 10 to 3 on the clock face then comence the scrapping the mud action to engage the hammy]) This heat map would also give information like whether you were overusing stabilising muscle in your pedal stroke --> do core stability excercies off the bike.
So we measure Alberto, heat map and power-meter him. Then all we have to do is replicate. I suggest pedal stroke then power.
I am sure all you smart readers will throw up lots of issues on why this wouldn’t work, especially non-standard anatomy arguments, but to my way of thinking the ultimate cycling conservation is in recruiting as many muscles as possible.
I think though, that we might find that my subdivision into three styles (TT, crit etc.,) would not be broad enough. Probably, the top Pro’s use a subtly different muscle recruitment series for a far more varied range of terrains/conditions.
Anyway, I think this is a really interesting topic.
User avatar
ft_critical
 
Posts: 1529
Joined: Thu Jan 14, 2010 1:06 pm
Location: Slowing and Fattening :-)

Re: Physiology of power

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:23 pm

ft_critical wrote: but to my way of thinking the ultimate cycling conservation is in recruiting as many muscles as possible.

I prefer to use the muscles that matter. and as cycling conversations go, it's sure not in my top 10 :lol:
User avatar
Alex Simmons/RST
Expert
 
Posts: 3427
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 3:51 pm

Re: Physiology of power

Postby sogood » Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:36 pm

Alex Simmons/RST wrote:If you want to understand why/how these changes occur, then try the texts I referenced. But you may have to look even deeper.

Starting to get into molecular/genetic physiology... :mrgreen:
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU


Return to Training

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers
> BNA Cycling Kit