Bryton Rider 310T review - commuter perspective

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Boognoss
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Bryton Rider 310T review - commuter perspective

Postby Boognoss » Thu May 12, 2016 3:03 pm

About me

I'm a 12000+km p.a. commuter about 90% of the time and recreational the other 10%. Round trip is 50km if I don't throw in extras so I fall into the roadie/lycra-wearing category as well as transportation cyclist. Plain clothes for me are just not feasible (I'm a heavy perspirer). I ride in all conditions, but unfortunately for the 2 month Bryton test (and fortunately for me ;)) I didn't encounter torrential rain. Only light showers a few times.

Caveat

I've been using Garmin GPS computers since 2008. I've had the Edge 305, Edge 705, Forerunner 910XT (with mount conversion kit to use the twist mount system on my bikes) and finally and currently the Edge 1000.

I am firmly entrenched in the Garmin ecosystem so this review will contain comparisons/differences comparing Bryton and Garmin devices and interfaces.

If you want to see the images closer up, just click on them below. A full res. version will load.

How tiny is it! a.k.a the unboxing

Pen for size comparison.
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In the box - (clockwise from left) startup guide, the computer, micro-USB cable, HRM, cadence sensor, mount.
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Setup screen 1 - pick your language.
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Setup screen 2 - pick your units of measurement.
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Splash screen - job done in two simple steps.
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On the bike - a busy dashboard
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Initial impressions and mounting.

As you can see I mounted the Bryton on the stem, there wasn't really much more space for it. The mount while similar to Garmin's twist mount system is not compatible. I tried the Bryton on the K-Edge out front mount and it was too loose to securely mount it.
From the receipt of the unit in it's tiny box, to the unit itself I was impressed with how small it is. The Garmin Forerunner 910XT (my previous daily computer) itself is smaller as it's primarily a wrist-watch format device but having spent the past 15 months looking down at the smart-phone sized Edge 1000 has altered my perception a little.

After initial setup, the GPS lock took about 5 mins and has been sub-30 seconds every time since.

HRM and cadence sensors connected fine straight away and didn't miss a beat. I did a short test (couple of days' commuting) with them in conjunction with my usual Garmin sensors (HRM, separate speed, separate cadence). Most of the time I didn't use them since two HRMs was at the same time was a bit much. The speed/cadence sensors didn't conflict as the Garmin speed sensor is wrapped onto the front hub. The Garmin cadence module sat next to the Bryton magnet without any problems and the Bryton cadence sensor was cabled tied to the chainstay like the Garmin GSC10 sensor without the arm part (Bryton have an optional "ANT+ Speed and Cadence Dual sensor" available if you want to capture speed without relying on the GPS signal).

On the road.

The Rider 310 has 2 bike profiles. For this review I only used two bikes so it was easy to capture separate distance data, but if this were my daily computer as I have 5 bikes this is limiting for me at least. I'd probably just stick with a single bike profile and use Strava/BikeJournal.com to log different rides to different bikes.

It's very much a device that just works once your get out for a ride. Hit start and away you go.

At the cafe - different angle
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Uploading rides.

The Bryton Sport website is simple and easy to navigate. After you create your user account with your email address, or use Facebook to login you're presented with a simple interface.

The upload process is manual but easy on a computer (* - next paragraph). You connect the Bryton to your computer via USB and browse to it, manually select the .FIT file/s and upload. Simple, but you can upload the same rides if you're not careful. There's no duplicate checking.

* - I did attempt to connect the Bryton to my iPhone 6 (iOS 9.3.1) via Bluetooth initially, but for me it wouldn't connect at all. I gave up and went with the USB option which for me where a bike computer is concerned is not an issue. The unit needs to be charged anyway. Battery life is very good, I only charged once a week after 10-13hrs riding and it still had about 50% charge left according to the 4-step battery charge meter.

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Uploading to Strava was also very easy and the data looks the same as Garmin GPS data. I setup a new Strava account for these rides since they would affect my KM count on my main account. That's why it looks like I rode with myself in the example ride :).
If it's not on Strava, the ride didn't happen. This ride REALLY happened.

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Conclusion.

For the money it's a great piece of kit (AU$269 RRP for the 310T). The Garmin equivalent would probably be the Edge 25 which for $269 includes a cadence sensor but not HRM. HRM is another $89 option (for the soft-strap model) so to match spec you're up for $358 for the Garmin.
If you're already invested in the Garmin ecosystem (Garmin Connect) then this may be a consideration if you don't want to jump ship.

If you don't need maps or navigation and want a simple computer to track your rides and also upload to Strava to brag among your friends I recommend it.

It's a great first bike computer in my opinion.

Disclosure: The Bryton Rider 310T was provided by Bryton as free to keep through Bicycles Network Australia in return for writing a review.
Salsa Casseroll, Avanti Quantum, Specialized Tricross, Specialized Allez, Cell SS

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Re: Bryton Rider 310T review - commuter perspective

Postby Lukeyboy » Wed Jun 08, 2016 8:18 pm

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the 36hr battery life...

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Re: Bryton Rider 310T review - commuter perspective

Postby Boognoss » Thu Jun 09, 2016 8:58 am

Lukeyboy wrote:I'm surprised no one has mentioned the 36hr battery life...


Doh, good point.

My Edge 1000 is recharged daily (it only goes down to 85% give or take each way on the commute). The Bryton however lasted at least a week of 2+ hours each day. I think I got a week and a half out of it before it ran flat (not the 36 hrs but pretty good regardless).
Salsa Casseroll, Avanti Quantum, Specialized Tricross, Specialized Allez, Cell SS

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Re: Bryton Rider 310T review - commuter perspective

Postby Lukeyboy » Thu Jun 09, 2016 3:43 pm

Mine wasn't fully charged and had been left static for 15 days but I managed to get 25h14m out of mine. 16 hours of which had the backlight on before I went to bed with it still glowing. I woke up the next morning with the backlight off so who knows how long it was on for before it turned off for power saving. It spazes out the screen reading of your running time when you clock over 24hr in one continuous recording but it will still record for playback. Depending on how you configure the unit (backlighting/gps strength etc) it wouldn't surprise me to see it get very close to it. Garmin....... when it comes to battery life eat your heart out.

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For the record I wasn't part of the test thing. I bought it purely for the battery life claim. Due to a few reasons after purchasing it I can't give my full thoughts on it due to not being able to ride a bike for a while. The battery life however does get a thumbs up from me. If you plan on doing some long rides where you don't want your garmin to clonk out/back up unit and don't want to drain your phone you could consider the 310. Same deal with just recharging it once a week for commuting.

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