Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

I'm not a doctor but… 
Cycling injury, recovery and health issues.
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What is Your resting HR?

Below 45
56
14%
45 to 50
74
18%
51 to 55
77
19%
56 to 60
80
19%
61 to 65
63
15%
66 to 70
33
8%
71 to 75
15
4%
76 to 80
7
2%
Over 80
6
1%
 
Total votes : 411

Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby grub » Mon May 10, 2010 7:16 pm

gazman wrote:I am 57 with a resting heart rate of 50. Blood pressure, however, has been gradually getting higher so succumbed to medication last Friday. So far, no side effects, and no change to riding. Should I expect any side effects?


your doctor should have probably mentioned a couple. I just started meds a month ago and, so far, no side-effects. Took the first couple of rides easy though. You may get dizzy if you stand up quickly.

Just had my resting heart rate done - 51... 51 !!! I would have estimated 65+
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by BNA » Wed May 12, 2010 8:49 am

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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Old and Rusty » Wed May 12, 2010 8:49 am

I'm 46, I weight 113kg, 6'4" or 195cm tall and 2 years ago I had a heart attack caused by a largish blood clot caught in a narrowish (due to a pack & a half of darts a day) artery which was fixed with a stent. I am on a daily dose of 1 x Bicor 5mg, 1 x Ramipril 10mg, 1 x asprin 100mg & 1 x Clopidogrel 75mg. These drugs are meant to slow heart rate, lower blood pressure, thin blood and reduce clotting as precautionary measures I guess until the quacks are happy my vascular system is back in shape.

My resting heart rate is always between 52 & 60 with 55 being the most common score.
Blood Pressure between 127/70 & 131/80

Last night I wore a heart rate monitor for the first time while riding and from Prestons to Elizabeth Drv my average was 112bpm with a high score of 211.

Here is the GPS details of the ride
http://sportstracker.nokia.com/nts/workoutdetail/index.do?id=2484540

I wasn't really pushing myself until the climb at the end of the graph as I was determined to get up without dropping cadence.
I'd like to know what some of the more experienced older members think about this as 211 is a pretty big number for a 46yo but I didn't feel dizzy or crook or any pain, the only discomfort was my screaming legs and my lungs wanting to burst from the smoke in the air.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Unko » Tue Jan 24, 2012 7:42 pm

bump
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Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby gabrielle260 » Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:50 pm

I'm 52 and my RHR is 44. When I started riding 23 yrs ago, the lowest it got was 39 at sea level. In '93 in Colorado at 8800 ft it dropped to 36.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Addictr3 » Tue Jan 24, 2012 10:36 pm

strong bump

my RHR is around 35
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby ldrcycles » Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:39 am

Good to hear someone else mentioning 'running hot'. The lowest i've seen just after waking is 49, but during a ride i normally run 160-175, on one occasion i went berserk 2k into a ride and saw it hit 215 :shock: . And i remember the first (and only so far :) ) race i won i checked my HRM afterwards and had an average of 190 for 1hr30. I most definitely would not call myself 'fit' at this stage, strongish perhaps but my aerobic fitness is pretty poor IMO, yet i have a low RHR. In that case i don't think it can be that much of a pointer to fitness, but still fun to see anyway.

And i remember someone telling me about a professional rider they knew, his lowest was supposedly 27 :shock: .
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Comedian » Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:44 am

Generally speaking I'm in the 45-50 range but it's often as low as 43. :)
Once you can climb hills on a bike it's all downhill. :mrgreen:

Hopefully I'll know what that's like..... one day. :shock: :lol:

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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby BarryTas » Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:56 am

where is Skull when you need him?
when do we stop for coffee???

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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Wed Jan 25, 2012 8:10 am

ldrcycles wrote: In that case i don't think it can be that much of a pointer to fitness, but still fun to see anyway.

HR is not a measure of fitness.

How much power you can sustain for various durations is.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby skull » Wed Jan 25, 2012 8:21 am

BarryTas wrote:where is Skull when you need him?


HAHA here

RHR sitting at desk now after riding in this morning is 36 BPM, I have recorded it below 30 lying there in bed before getting up (this was when I was competing in at a pretty high level for speed skating)

I have a naturally pretty low HR and can be in a ride travelling along at 120ish BPM while the others are up and over 150. The only concern is I have a family history of heart disease so I really do need to go and get it checked out by a doc (Apparently my Great Grandfather died from a heart attack at a young age, my Grandfather died from a heart attack in his 40s, Uncle died from a heart attack in his 40s, dad luckily kept rather active. His heart issues were found when he had to do a special medical to renew his pilot license due to being over 60 years old. Ended up finding a leaky valve and he needed a triple bypass. The doc said if he was lucky and if he wasn't a pilot and needed to do that testing for his license he would have only found out about it when he had a heart attack.

When I had my wisdoms out and they knocked me out for it, upon wake up the doc mentioned that my HR got really - really low at one stage (IIRC he said at one point it registered at 12). I know the automatic machines at the hospitals always beep at me saying I am dead.


Alex Simmons/RST wrote:HR is not a measure of fitness.

How much power you can sustain for various durations is.


True because I always find even tho my heart is doing less work then the others I am riding with up the hills, they still punish me.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby bigfriendlyvegan » Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:18 am

For those interested in heart rate and fitness, from http://www.drmirkin.com/archive/6941.html
Resting Heart Rate and Recovery Heart Rate
Report #6941

A slow resting heart rate is often used as a measure of fitness, but your recovery heart rate is far more dependable.

A study in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise shows that a 20-week program of endurance training does not slow the resting heart rate, so it cannot be used as a measure of fitness (1). The best way to measure fitness is to check how long it takes for your heart to slow down after you've exercised as hard as you can. This is called your recovery heart rate.

Another study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that recovery heart rate is one of the best tests to predict your risk for having a heart attack (2). Recovery heart rate is a measure of fitness and a slow recovery from exercise means that you are out of shape. The study really shows that being out of shape increases your chances of having a heart attack.

To measure your recovery heart rate, exercise in your sport as hard as you can for more than 10 minutes. If you run regularly, run fast. If you ride a bicycle, pedal rapidly. Then check your pulse on a heart rate monitor, or place your hands on the sides of your neck where you feel a pulse. Count your pulse for only six seconds and multiply that number times ten to get your heart rate per minute. Your heart slows down immediately after you stop exercising. The longer you count your pulse, the more it will slow down. Wait exactly sixty seconds and then check your monitor again, or count your pulse for six seconds and again multiply that number times ten.

If your heart does not slow down at least thirty beats per minute in the first minute, you are in poor shape. If it slows down more than fifty beats in the first minute, you are in excellent shape. You can use the recovery pulse rate to measure improvements in fitness. Do not use this test if there is any question of heart damage; hard exercise cannot hurt a healthy heart, but it can cause irregular heart beats in people who have damaged hearts. More

By Gabe Mirkin, M.D., for CBS Radio News
Checked 8/8/07

1. Wilmore JH et al. Endurance exercise training has a minimal effect on resting heart rate: the Heritage study. Medicine and Science in Sprts and Exercise. 1996 (July); 28(7): 829-835.

2. Cole CR et al. Hear-rate recovery immediately after exercise as a predictor of mortality. New England Journal of Medicine 1999(October 28);341(18):1351-7.




ldrcycles wrote:And i remember someone telling me about a professional rider they knew, his lowest was supposedly 27 :shock: .


Miguel Indurain, from the Wikipedia entry:

Indurain had a physiology superior to fellow athletes. His blood took seven litres of oxygen around his body per minute,[22] compared to 3–4 litres for an ordinary person and 5–6 litres for fellow riders. His cardiac output is 50 litres a minute; a fit amateur cyclist's is about 25 litres. Indurain's lung capacity was 7.8 litres,[2] compared to an average of 6 litres. His resting pulse was as low as 28 BPM,[2] compared to an average 60–72 bpm, which meant his heart would be less strained in the tough mountain stages.[14] His VO2 max was 88 ml/kg/min; in comparison, Lance Armstrong's was 83.8 ml/kg/min and Greg LeMond's was more than 92 ml/kg/min.[23]
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:40 am

bigfriendlyvegan wrote:For those interested in heart rate and fitness, from http://www.drmirkin.com/archive/6941.html
Resting Heart Rate and Recovery Heart Rate
Report #6941

A slow resting heart rate is often used as a measure of fitness, but your recovery heart rate is far more dependable.

No where near as dependable as measuring how much power you can sustain. If such a study didn't assess whether such subjects could produce more power (or run faster for longer) then it matters diddly squat what their heart does.

bigfriendlyvegan wrote:
ldrcycles wrote:And i remember someone telling me about a professional rider they knew, his lowest was supposedly 27 :shock: .


Miguel Indurain, from the Wikipedia entry:

Indurain had a physiology superior to fellow athletes. His blood took seven litres of oxygen around his body per minute,[22] compared to 3–4 litres for an ordinary person and 5–6 litres for fellow riders. His cardiac output is 50 litres a minute; a fit amateur cyclist's is about 25 litres. Indurain's lung capacity was 7.8 litres,[2] compared to an average of 6 litres. His resting pulse was as low as 28 BPM,[2] compared to an average 60–72 bpm, which meant his heart would be less strained in the tough mountain stages.[14] His VO2 max was 88 ml/kg/min; in comparison, Lance Armstrong's was 83.8 ml/kg/min and Greg LeMond's was more than 92 ml/kg/min.[23]

Yes, O2 utilisation is a reasonable measure of fitness, since the rate at which we can utilise O2 is directly related to the power we can sustain (we release 20.9kJ per litre of O2). however power is far superior, since it also accounts for gross metabolic efficiency and % of VO2max we can sustain.

VO2max is only a general indicator of fitness, it's not a particularly good predictor of performance. Power of course is much better for that.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby bigfriendlyvegan » Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:59 am

Alex, since we're talking power over HR etc. for fitness, other than on a bike, are there ways to measure power without some sort of static ergometer? I know that there are plenty of rowing, climbing, gliding type machines, but they're "artificial" in that they can't measure power output vs actual terrain.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby ColinOldnCranky » Wed Jan 25, 2012 11:06 am

I used to ride quite regularly and quite hard in tmy sporting days to maintain the level of fitness required for my sport. Cycling was probably the major determinant of my fitness for the decade from when I turned 40 until I gave up all competition. I still nominate biking as the generally most useful base on which to achieve high levels of aerobic fitness. The unicycle doesn't come close.

My resting and basal pulse rates have gone the wrong way by a lot since I gave up competitive sport ten years ago but still good enough to beat most healthy teenagers and fitter-than-average young adults. It does not add to any risk factors for the usual nasties that afflict us as we get older so it's still ok by me.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Alex Simmons/RST » Wed Jan 25, 2012 1:53 pm

bigfriendlyvegan wrote:Alex, since we're talking power over HR etc. for fitness, other than on a bike, are there ways to measure power without some sort of static ergometer? I know that there are plenty of rowing, climbing, gliding type machines, but they're "artificial" in that they can't measure power output vs actual terrain.

Power measurement requires two things:
- measuring the forces and speeds
So in order to measure power you need to be able to record those.

There are oars that can do this for rowers, although I'm not knowledgeable enough to say how well they do this.
I'm not aware that there are mobile devices for estimating running power. That would be more problematic for various reasons.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby iMad » Mon Feb 06, 2012 9:53 am

bigfriendlyvegan wrote:For those interested in heart rate and fitness, from http://www.drmirkin.com/archive/6941.html
Resting Heart Rate and Recovery Heart Rate
Report #6941

To measure your recovery heart rate, exercise in your sport as hard as you can for more than 10 minutes. If you run regularly, run fast. If you ride a bicycle, pedal rapidly. Then check your pulse on a heart rate monitor, or place your hands on the sides of your neck where you feel a pulse. Count your pulse for only six seconds and multiply that number times ten to get your heart rate per minute. Your heart slows down immediately after you stop exercising. The longer you count your pulse, the more it will slow down. Wait exactly sixty seconds and then check your monitor again, or count your pulse for six seconds and again multiply that number times ten.

If your heart does not slow down at least thirty beats per minute in the first minute, you are in poor shape. If it slows down more than fifty beats in the first minute, you are in excellent shape. You can use the recovery pulse rate to measure improvements in fitness. Do not use this test if there is any question of heart damage; hard exercise cannot hurt a healthy heart, but it can cause irregular heart beats in people who have damaged hearts. More


Somehow I can't see this formula being of value across the board.
I'm 67 y.o. and my theoretical MHR is 153. A 20 year old might have a MHR of 200 or more.
A 50 BPM reduction in the first minute after exercising for a 20 y.o. would be 25% or less of max whereas for me it would be around 33%.
I can't for a moment imagine my HR to drop from 150 to 100 in 60 seconds no matter how fit I was?
And for what it's worth, my resting HR AFAIK is 52 bpm.
Any thoughts?
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby RobRollin » Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:01 pm

My resting is 56 and at my desk around 60. My maximum in a sprint Ive gone to is 192, climbing I can sit at 160-170. Just ticking the legs over my avg is around 120bpm.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby Parker » Tue Feb 07, 2012 3:23 pm

I'm 27 and mine is 44
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby ving » Tue Feb 07, 2012 3:57 pm

56bpm usually for me.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby AndrewBurns » Tue Feb 07, 2012 4:43 pm

24 years old and between 55 and 60 BPM. My maximum is around 192 BPM (I basically never see higher when cycling, racing or otherwise). My average for most hard rides is around the 170 to 180 range while for very easy rides it's around 120-130. I don't know, it just seems that my heart goes hard all the time.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby dynamictiger » Tue Feb 07, 2012 6:08 pm

When I was young and in peak condition my HR seldom drifted above 39 bpm.

Then age, smoking and working became involved. Just last year I was regularly turned away from blood donation as my resting HR exceeded 100 bpm.

About May last year I decided to go on a diet, having quit smoking the year before, and take up some exercise. My resting HR now is 49. This is my age so I am pretty happy with my efforts to date. I have also noticed my recovery is improving rapidly as well. I am looking forward to the next six months to see what happens next.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby waramatt » Tue Feb 07, 2012 6:44 pm

Resting rate 45 bpm age 51
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby lethoso » Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:09 pm

hum, measured mine twice today while sitting around, 52 & 56 bpm (I'm 26).

It's been ~70 for as long as I can remember, but I've been riding a lot the last 6 months, my fitness is definitely going up, so will be interesting to see what happens to it!
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby dancer » Sat Feb 25, 2012 1:08 pm

I spent my 20s and early 30s as a recreational runner and my resting HR was always mid 50s. I took up cycling 2 years ago and now cycle and run and my resting HR now hovers around 45 - 48. (I'm 39yo).

Cycling has definitely improved my aerobic capacity (I spend longer on the bike at a lower HR than running) so perhaps this is the reason for the fall in HR.
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Re: Resting Heart rate.What's yours?

Postby durilium » Tue Apr 24, 2012 6:00 am

My resting hrt sitting on the couch is 53bpm, thats using a android app for my galaxy S2 which users have tested against other equipment and say is accurate to within 2bpm.

No idea what my max is until i purchase a wrist mount monitor soon.
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