healthy weight (BMI)

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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:42 pm

gtfpv cycler wrote:aside from bmi , we know if we are over weight naked . and the muscle thing , well i'm going hard to lose weight >( the gut now ) and have put on 1kg this week , my thighs are smaller though and harder , so this could be a long haul to get the right body fat loss , its a case of gaining while losing , think of the image relationship now , smaller thighs to belly ratio , i'm actually looking a little fatter naked , it's the 1st time in a long time where my goals now just arent pure weight related . we can look good in clothes , and still be over weight because clothes hides it , but really look in the mirror at your proportions , when they are right , take your bmi then , and i bet you'll be close to the money .

It will be interesting to see if there is any correlation between BMI and waist measurement. My number 1 goal right now is to reduce my abdominal fat because while I have it I am at increased risk of a number of things. Although, it is good that my waist is a lot smaller.

gtfpv cycler wrote: also i dont know about body fat , but when i was 20 my room mate was very into fitness and marshall arts, he was like a steel door , with a twig waist . he had 7% body fat , he would get every flu or sniffle going around , and would spend a day in bed if he missed a meal . i wouldnt aim for any body fat before speaking to a proffessional .

Good call. I also know a guy who had a low body fat % and he was sick all of the time. I don't think it is healthy to take it too low but conversely if it goes to high then you are at risk for disease. I don't have any particular goal for body fat %, just trying to get my abdominal fat down to a healthy level.
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by BNA » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:56 am

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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby Aushiker » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:56 am

Hi

Sorry if this has been posted before but I am now working towards a waist measurement < 94 cm rather than a specific weight (and hence BMI) as per the Measure Up program


No matter what your height or build, an increased waistline is a sign that you could be at increased risk of developing serious problems including chronic disease such as some cancers, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Waist measurements should only be used for adults to check their risk of developing a chronic disease. Measurements that indicate increased risks for children and young people have not been developed....

A waist measurement of greater than 94cm for men or 80cm for women is an indicator of internal fat deposits, which can coat the heart, kidneys, liver and pancreas, and increase the risk of chronic disease. Waist circumference should only be used for adults to check the risk of developing a chronic disease. Measurements that indicate increased risks for children and teenagers have not been developed.


More at the aforementioned website.

Andrew
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby Comedian » Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:23 pm

Aushiker wrote:Hi

Sorry if this has been posted before but I am now working towards a waist measurement < 94 cm rather than a specific weight (and hence BMI) as per the Measure Up program


No matter what your height or build, an increased waistline is a sign that you could be at increased risk of developing serious problems including chronic disease such as some cancers, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Waist measurements should only be used for adults to check their risk of developing a chronic disease. Measurements that indicate increased risks for children and young people have not been developed....

A waist measurement of greater than 94cm for men or 80cm for women is an indicator of internal fat deposits, which can coat the heart, kidneys, liver and pancreas, and increase the risk of chronic disease. Waist circumference should only be used for adults to check the risk of developing a chronic disease. Measurements that indicate increased risks for children and teenagers have not been developed.


More at the aforementioned website.

Andrew


I'vd decided just to keep loosing weight until the people I pass going up MtCootha start calling out "Feed HIM!". :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Seriously, that's a good idea I think. Have you got any links to how to measure? I just strung a tape measure around my waist and it was 89? I'll have to work out how to do it consistently. :)
Once you can climb hills on a bike it's all downhill. :mrgreen:

Hopefully I'll know what that's like..... one day. :shock: :lol:

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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby casual_cyclist » Wed Apr 20, 2011 10:13 pm

Comedian wrote:Seriously, that's a good idea I think. Have you got any links to how to measure? I just strung a tape measure around my waist and it was 89? I'll have to work out how to do it consistently. :)

That's the problem. I have no idea either. I still don't even have a tape measure! I will be doing some research into this and will keep you up to date.
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby casual_cyclist » Thu Apr 21, 2011 12:30 am

Interesting post about BMI vs weight-to-height ratio at Livestrong:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/93638-whtr-the-new-determinant-health-risk/

New research shows that the WHtR, not BMI, is the most accurate assessment tool for health risk. People with the most weight around their waists are at greatest risk of diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Therefore, since you can't change your height, you should take special care to keep your weight and in particular, abdominal girth in a healthy range by eating nutritiously and exercising regularly.
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby mekore » Thu Apr 21, 2011 2:51 am

Even with trained health practitioners, there are variation of measurement between operators. At least you can use waist circumference measurements that is generated by yourself to monitor your training/diet
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby simonn » Thu Apr 21, 2011 9:18 am

gtfpv cycler wrote: also i dont know about body fat , but when i was 20 my room mate was very into fitness and marshall arts, he was like a steel door , with a twig waist . he had 7% body fat , he would get every flu or sniffle going around , and would spend a day in bed if he missed a meal . i wouldnt aim for any body fat before speaking to a proffessional .


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anecdotal_Evidence
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby casual_cyclist » Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:08 pm

simonn wrote:
gtfpv cycler wrote: also i dont know about body fat , but when i was 20 my room mate was very into fitness and marshall arts, he was like a steel door , with a twig waist . he had 7% body fat , he would get every flu or sniffle going around , and would spend a day in bed if he missed a meal . i wouldnt aim for any body fat before speaking to a proffessional .


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anecdotal_Evidence

underweight predisposes people to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21299854

Underweight was associated with a substantially increased risk of death in all Asian populations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21345101

We conclude that underweight, overweight and obesity in midlife increase dementia risk.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21348917

Both underweight and obese women were at increased risk.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21274456

Not smoking, moderate alcohol consumption, physical activity, and normal weight are important health promoters in our aging population.
(from the same study above)
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby Graeme H » Sun Apr 24, 2011 4:49 am

philip wrote:I wonder what the average BMI of pro cyclists is.


Don't know about the average, but I picked through the "Pro Bike" articles on the cyclingnews website, which list the rider's height and weight and their bike frame/fit dimensions.
From the last 15 riders they covered, the average BMI was 21.8.
From that small group,
High: Fabian Cancellara (23.7) and Thor Hushovd (24.8)
Middle: Tyler Farrar (22.1), Tom Boonen (22.2) and Philippe Gilbert (22.5)
Low: Charly Wegelius (19.1) and Andy Schleck (19.7)

[EDITED to remove the accidental smiley. Sorry, noob error, failed to preview.]
Last edited by Graeme H on Sun Apr 24, 2011 12:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby wombatK » Sun Apr 24, 2011 7:48 am

Graeme H wrote:
philip wrote:I wonder what the average BMI of pro cyclists is.


Don't know about the average, but I picked through the "Pro Bike" articles on the cyclingnews website, which list the rider's height and weight and their bike frame/fit dimensions.
From the last 15 riders they covered, the average BMI was 21.8.
From that small group,
High: Fabian Cancellara (23.7) and Thor Hushovd (24.8)
Middle: Tyler Farrar (22.1), Tom Boonen (22.2) and Philippe Gilbert (22.5)
Low: Charly Wegelius (19.1) and Andy Schleck (19.7)

Thanks for the stats Graeme.

But damn - I've got to lose a bit more to get the pro look (currently 21.9) 8)
Better watch how much choccie I hoe into today :lol:
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Re: healthy weight (BMI)

Postby ColinOldnCranky » Sun Apr 24, 2011 10:01 am

BMI is a useful tool for a statistical measure of a given demographic. But even then it has it's problems. As an indicator for an individual it is nigh on useless. Southern italian males will have a bmi that would unfairly rate them compared to, say, nordics of equivalent excess fat.

Someone gave Mike Tyson as an example - a very good one - of the fallacy of bmi. Similarly, if you took the bmi of a typically fit afl footballer and then sought out Jo Average of the same BMI, you will most likely find someone significantly overweight. (Ironically that person may be a "keen australian sporst person" who spends too much time watching sport and not actually doing it. But now I am being twisted and harking back to a time when we played more and watched less. Perhaps I have grumpy-old-man syndrome.)

If you are concerned get someone to make a proper assessment of your body fat content. Skin calliper (pinch) test for one but there are a number of them.
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