My girlfriend getting too thin?

I'm not a doctor but… 
Cycling injury, recovery and health issues.
Forum rules
The information / discussion in the Cycling Health Forum is not qualified medical advice. Please consult your doctor.

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:13 pm

winstonw wrote:it's willful in that there's no other info emanating from health professionals other than to keep your BMI between designated numbers, to eat a balanced diet, to reduce xyz foods, and increase abc foods.

and yet, the collective group think persists, reinforcing each other, demanding they are all worthy of feasting not on special feast days, but everyday.

The difficulty is, medicos are restrained by evidence. The profession is not at liberty to make up things or juice up here and there. And the fact is, weight reduction and healthy living are all relatively simple. The guidance have largely been given already back in the primary school. Group think? That's a totally different set of relationship.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

by BNA » Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:05 am

BNA
 

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:05 am

sogood wrote:
winstonw wrote:it's willful in that there's no other info emanating from health professionals other than to keep your BMI between designated numbers, to eat a balanced diet, to reduce xyz foods, and increase abc foods.

and yet, the collective group think persists, reinforcing each other, demanding they are all worthy of feasting not on special feast days, but everyday.

The difficulty is, medicos are restrained by evidence. The profession is not at liberty to make up things or juice up here and there. And the fact is, weight reduction and healthy living are all relatively simple. The guidance have largely been given already back in the primary school. Group think? That's a totally different set of relationship.

Is there any evidence behind BMI?
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:08 am

For example: Study Suggests Lower Mortality Risk for People Deemed to Be Overweight

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/health/study-suggests-lower-death-risk-for-the-overweight.html?_r=0
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:24 am

casual_cyclist wrote:Is there any evidence behind BMI?

It's a well established reference clinical indicator that was derived statistically amongst other factors for many years. More importantly, it's also well studied and documented knowledge in terms of its limitations. It's being used for public health education because it's well studied and is very simple to follow. Unfortunately, lay public often fails to appreciate its public health benefits and get narrowly stuck into criticising and discounting it for its known limits. Fact is, it's not a case where one is at death's door at 25.1 while perfectly well at 25.0. It's a guidance number that needs to be considered amongst many other factors. It's a big picture guide.
Last edited by sogood on Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:31 am

casual_cyclist wrote:For example: Study Suggests Lower Mortality Risk for People Deemed to Be Overweight
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/health/study-suggests-lower-death-risk-for-the-overweight.html?_r=0

There are study results in any which way for any subject. Hence it's important to consider all studies on a particular subject before drawing a conclusion. A proper perspective on a subject is important and that's something only a learnt professional can provide. Internet and Google has given rise to desktop experts who are expert at digging up that contrary view eg. The current anti-vaccination mentality amongst certain parent groups. Listen to guidance from reputable experts and national health bodies. Take sensationalistic, always (sometimes)-provides-two-views media with a grain of salt.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby winstonw » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:40 am

sogood wrote:
winstonw wrote:it's willful in that there's no other info emanating from health professionals other than to keep your BMI between designated numbers, to eat a balanced diet, to reduce xyz foods, and increase abc foods.

and yet, the collective group think persists, reinforcing each other, demanding they are all worthy of feasting not on special feast days, but everyday.

The difficulty is, medicos are restrained by evidence. The profession is not at liberty to make up things or juice up here and there. And the fact is, weight reduction and healthy living are all relatively simple. The guidance have largely been given already back in the primary school. Group think? That's a totally different set of relationship.


I didn't mean 'no other info' in a limited sense, rather, that I think the message to eat a balanced diet and keep your BMI within a range, is ubiquitous.
There is so much info around imho, that anyone who is not aware of what a balanced diet is, or a healthy BMI, is willfully antagonistic towards the prevailing health care message...suspicious of it, and thinking some blogger has a superior diet that will gift them eternal youth.

And those who say it is too hard to eat a balanced diet or they are unable to overcome cravings, in the majority of cases have a long history of unbalanced eating. Kids fed a balanced diet are less likely to grow up to eat an unbalanced diet.

The growth trajectory of liteneasy and jenny craig astounds me.
What it says is not only is there abhorrent ignorance out there about how to eat a balanced diet, but a lack of will to find out and DIY.

Much of Australia suffers from sclerosis of the will, and very rubbery values.
Heard a report on ABC radio the other day saying 1/4 of Australian tax revenue goes towards health services....and it is escalating....and the majority of services are required for lifestyle associated disease. That money could pay for a lot of scientific breakthroughs! sad
User avatar
winstonw
 
Posts: 1793
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 7:18 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:45 am

winstonw wrote:... Much of Australia suffers from sclerosis of the will, and very rubbery values.

I agree. Unfortunately much of that is deeply linked into human nature and it takes a good kick in the butt to get going again. Facing the reality is even harder for those, often generating fierce resistance using nitty gritty data, losing a perspective on the big picture. It's all very interesting to observe though, one that has been noted here on our forum again and again. :mrgreen:

In relation to healthy diet. Based on what I have seen in my son's primary school learning, they have all been presented in clarity, similar to the messages out to the adult population. But without practice at the family level, I can see how all that instruction just flies over some's head. Sad but true, one can lead a horse to water but can't make it drink. C'est la vie.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby simonn » Wed Oct 23, 2013 9:12 am

casual_cyclist wrote:For example: Study Suggests Lower Mortality Risk for People Deemed to Be Overweight

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/health/study-suggests-lower-death-risk-for-the-overweight.html?_r=0


Thought this rang a bell ------->

The most serious problem in the Flegal paper is that their normal weight group included a mix of lean and active people, heavy smokers, patients with cancer or other conditions that cause weight loss, and frail elderly people who had lost weight due to rapidly declining health. Because the overweight and obese groups were compared to this mix of healthy and ill persons who have a very high risk of death, this led to the false conclusions that being overweight is beneficial, and that grade 1 obesity carries no extra risk. Also, because the Flegal study did not use the original data from the published papers, they could not look separately at different age groups, and we know that the relation between body weight and mortality is much stronger before age 65 than at older ages.


http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionso ... tality-no/
Image
User avatar
simonn
 
Posts: 3599
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Sydney

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Wed Oct 23, 2013 1:11 pm

sogood wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:For example: Study Suggests Lower Mortality Risk for People Deemed to Be Overweight
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/health/study-suggests-lower-death-risk-for-the-overweight.html?_r=0

There are study results in any which way for any subject. Hence it's important to consider all studies on a particular subject before drawing a conclusion. A proper perspective on a subject is important and that's something only a learnt professional can provide. Internet and Google has given rise to desktop experts who are expert at digging up that contrary view eg. The current anti-vaccination mentality amongst certain parent groups. Listen to guidance from reputable experts and national health bodies. Take sensationalistic, always (sometimes)-provides-two-views media with a grain of salt.

The "sensational" media story was based on research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association... hardly a scandal rag. :wink:

Either way, aren't other measures such as waist circumference and waist to hip ratio better supported by scientific evidence? Here is what a medical doctor says:

Problems With The BMI Chart

All of the BMI studies cited above were done across large populations. Using that data and applying it to an individual without looking at the person’s overall health is a bad idea. BMI calculations do not consider age, gender, frame size, muscle mass, or fat distribution. Subcutaneous fat (under the skin) does not appear to strongly predispose to disease, whereas visceral fat (in and between the organs) does. Therefore, someone can have a normal BMI but a high percentage of visceral fat and be at high risk for diabetes and heart disease but a sumo wrestler, with a high BMI but little visceral fat, will be metabolically healthy.9 Additionally, as most people know, essentially all NFL running backs, most of whom sport 6-packs and sub-10% body fat would be classified as obese under this system. Even a recreational athlete with slightly above average muscle mass could be considered overweight.

Many doctors calculate the BMI of patients and make recommendation simply based on that number, which is a flawed approach for the reasons given above. In fact, I just saw a patient for physique coaching who was 5’9” and weighed 185 pounds. Despite having a 33 inch waist, 11% body fat and perfect cholesterol and blood sugar, his primary care doctor told him he must lose 25 pounds if he didn’t want to get diabetes and heart disease!

and
Better Alternatives to The BMI Chart

1) Body fat measurement: While BMI is used as proxy for body fat, it is a much better idea to just measure body fat. Health is generally better with lower body fat percentages regardless of the BMI, and this includes populations with documented diseases like diabetes.10 I recommend striving for maximum muscle mass and a body fat below 15% for men and 23% for women. These numbers are within the “fitness range” of recommended body fat according to the American Council on Exercise.

2) Waist to hip circumference: Since it is becoming very clear that the distribution of body fat is an important indicator is disease risk, it makes sense to examine it.11 People with fat distributed around the abdomen are at higher risk for heart disease and diabetes12 13, so aiming to reduce the ratio is a better idea than trying to reduce BMI. In other words, if you just focus on “losing weight” you may very well end up losing muscle as well and looking like a shrunk down version of your former self, with the same risk of serious disease as before.

As always, it is important to look at the “big picture” rather than focusing on a particular calculation to evaluate your chances of developing an obesity-related illness.

BMI was never meant to be applied to individuals. For an individual, there may be some correlation between "overweight" and risk of adverse health outcomes but remember "correlation does not equal causation" :wink:
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Wed Oct 23, 2013 1:38 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:The "sensational" media story was based on research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association... hardly a scandal rag. :wink:

Medical journals are written for doctors, who have the necessary background to interpret a single report of whatever conclusion in the proper context. General media report of a sensationalistic headline based on a single study is just that, sensationalistic. What would be more appropriate for general readership would be a review article of the state of knowledge on said subject.

Either way, aren't other measures such as waist circumference and waist to hip ratio better supported by scientific evidence? Here is what a medical doctor says:

There are so many different measures out there, don't stop at waist circumference and waist-hip ratio. Again, taking a medical argument out to support your general point is interesting but limited. It's but natural in medical circles to have debates on any particular issue and you are just picking one side. There are still certain benefits with BMI.

BMI was never meant to be applied to individuals. For an individual, there may be some correlation between "overweight" and risk of adverse health outcomes but remember "correlation does not equal causation" :wink:

Medical knowledge are by majority, population based and statistically verified references. Saying "never meant to be applied to individuals" is not very meaningful. Remember, life is continuous rolls of dice and one can only hope and try to stay within the 2 SDs.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby simonn » Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:35 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:
sogood wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:For example: Study Suggests Lower Mortality Risk for People Deemed to Be Overweight
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/health/study-suggests-lower-death-risk-for-the-overweight.html?_r=0

There are study results in any which way for any subject. Hence it's important to consider all studies on a particular subject before drawing a conclusion. A proper perspective on a subject is important and that's something only a learnt professional can provide. Internet and Google has given rise to desktop experts who are expert at digging up that contrary view eg. The current anti-vaccination mentality amongst certain parent groups. Listen to guidance from reputable experts and national health bodies. Take sensationalistic, always (sometimes)-provides-two-views media with a grain of salt.

The "sensational" media story was based on research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association... hardly a scandal rag. :wink:

Either way, aren't other measures such as waist circumference and waist to hip ratio better supported by scientific evidence? Here is what a medical doctor says:

Problems With The BMI Chart

All of the BMI studies cited above were done across large populations. Using that data and applying it to an individual without looking at the person’s overall health is a bad idea. BMI calculations do not consider age, gender, frame size, muscle mass, or fat distribution. Subcutaneous fat (under the skin) does not appear to strongly predispose to disease, whereas visceral fat (in and between the organs) does. Therefore, someone can have a normal BMI but a high percentage of visceral fat and be at high risk for diabetes and heart disease but a sumo wrestler, with a high BMI but little visceral fat, will be metabolically healthy.9 Additionally, as most people know, essentially all NFL running backs, most of whom sport 6-packs and sub-10% body fat would be classified as obese under this system. Even a recreational athlete with slightly above average muscle mass could be considered overweight.

Many doctors calculate the BMI of patients and make recommendation simply based on that number, which is a flawed approach for the reasons given above. In fact, I just saw a patient for physique coaching who was 5’9” and weighed 185 pounds. Despite having a 33 inch waist, 11% body fat and perfect cholesterol and blood sugar, his primary care doctor told him he must lose 25 pounds if he didn’t want to get diabetes and heart disease!



Yes, athletic types do not fit the BMI. This is known. There are jobsworth doctors in the world. This is also known (and I'd rather find it out this way, than I dunno, whoops I missed that melanoma). The example of the 5"9'/185lbs/11% BF guy must be pretty ripped and probably doesn't make excuses for his BMI (of 27.32, only 2.32 points out of the good range, nowhere near obese!), but should see a better doctor.

Nobody has stated that BMI is the be and end all, only that it is a good guide for most people. If someone is concerned about their BMI, use other metrics too, go see a professional etc

casual_cyclist wrote:
Better Alternatives to The BMI Chart

1) Body fat measurement: While BMI is used as proxy for body fat, it is a much better idea to just measure body fat. Health is generally better with lower body fat percentages regardless of the BMI, and this includes populations with documented diseases like diabetes.10 I recommend striving for maximum muscle mass and a body fat below 15% for men and 23% for women. These numbers are within the “fitness range” of recommended body fat according to the American Council on Exercise.

2) Waist to hip circumference: Since it is becoming very clear that the distribution of body fat is an important indicator is disease risk, it makes sense to examine it.11 People with fat distributed around the abdomen are at higher risk for heart disease and diabetes12 13, so aiming to reduce the ratio is a better idea than trying to reduce BMI. In other words, if you just focus on “losing weight” you may very well end up losing muscle as well and looking like a shrunk down version of your former self, with the same risk of serious disease as before.

As always, it is important to look at the “big picture” rather than focusing on a particular calculation to evaluate your chances of developing an obesity-related illness.

BMI was never meant to be applied to individuals. For an individual, there may be some correlation between "overweight" and risk of adverse health outcomes but remember "correlation does not equal causation" :wink:


How does one "just measure body fat?". Measuring your waist and hips is harder than weighing yourself and measuring your height - would you trust your own waist and hip measurements to buy a suit?* I don't.

You have to be far more accurate with waist and hips to get a usable result, than for BMI.

Measuring your height still needs to be reasonably accurate for BMI, but you only have to do it once and from then on you just stand on the scales which is easy, very easy to do - you are unlikely to be able to measure a couple of mm difference in hip circumference, at least using mums measuring tape, like you would a 0.25-0.5kg drop in weight - which can be very encouraging (just make sure you do it at the same time each day, preferably the first thing when you get up in the morning).

*On another note, I bought a slim-fit suit recently and had to go up a waist size because my clearly massive quads were causing the pockets to flare out weirdly :), huzzah!
Image
User avatar
simonn
 
Posts: 3599
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Sydney

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby Parker » Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:40 pm

Hey CC... are you not at work? I've emailed you 2 x this week... gutted about no reply :(
Parker
 
Posts: 1426
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:25 pm

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:15 pm

sogood wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:The "sensational" media story was based on research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association... hardly a scandal rag. :wink:

Medical journals are written for doctors, who have the necessary background to interpret a single report of whatever conclusion in the proper context. General media report of a sensationalistic headline based on a single study is just that, sensationalistic. What would be more appropriate for general readership would be a review article of the state of knowledge on said subject.

Either way, aren't other measures such as waist circumference and waist to hip ratio better supported by scientific evidence? Here is what a medical doctor says:

There are so many different measures out there, don't stop at waist circumference and waist-hip ratio. Again, taking a medical argument out to support your general point is interesting but limited. It's but natural in medical circles to have debates on any particular issue and you are just picking one side. There are still certain benefits with BMI.

I've never read a decent study that showed a strong correlation (for individuals) between BMI and... well... anything really. Do you have any decent references to back up your claims?
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:34 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:I've never read a decent study that showed a strong correlation (for individuals) between BMI and... well... anything really. Do you have any decent references to back up your claims?

Yet you are able to find debunked studies that incorrectly state that BMI is of negative value? As said, BMI as well as any other health prescription are population based, a necessity in statistics. That's what we adopt for health advice. At an individual level, any of the population verified treatments can kill (due purely to individual variations), so what kind of proof are you looking for? It's logic failure and losing the perspective!
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:50 pm

sogood wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:I've never read a decent study that showed a strong correlation (for individuals) between BMI and... well... anything really. Do you have any decent references to back up your claims?

Yet you are able to find debunked studies that incorrectly state that BMI is of negative value? As said, BMI as well as any other health prescription are population based, a necessity in statistics. That's what we adopt for health advice. At an individual level, any of the population verified treatments can kill (due purely to individual variations), so what kind of proof are you looking for? It's logic failure and losing the perspective!

Well, I'm sure you know best.
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby Baldy » Wed Oct 23, 2013 9:56 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:
sogood wrote:
casual_cyclist wrote:I've never read a decent study that showed a strong correlation (for individuals) between BMI and... well... anything really. Do you have any decent references to back up your claims?

Yet you are able to find debunked studies that incorrectly state that BMI is of negative value? As said, BMI as well as any other health prescription are population based, a necessity in statistics. That's what we adopt for health advice. At an individual level, any of the population verified treatments can kill (due purely to individual variations), so what kind of proof are you looking for? It's logic failure and losing the perspective!

Well, I'm sure you know best.


:lol: awwwwwww
Baldy
 
Posts: 1669
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 4:55 pm

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby ColinOldnCranky » Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:00 am

Riddle: How do you know when you are a successful athlete?

Answer: When FIGJAM (we all know who it is) starts edging himself into your photo ops. :mrgreen:

Boom boom.
Unchain yourself - Ride a unicycle .Image
User avatar
ColinOldnCranky
 
Posts: 4697
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 3:58 pm

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby skull » Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:01 am

I had a pretty close to vegan day yesterday (only had greek yogurt that wasn't vegan). Wasn't too bad. Have upped fruit and vegetables massively and dropped meat plus other animal products consumption to hardly any. Seems to be going well.

Can't see myself going total vegan as I am still a fan of cows. However leaning towards the way I am going now will still be pretty good.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk 4
User avatar
skull
 
Posts: 1676
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:48 pm

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Thu Oct 24, 2013 12:31 pm

More Evidence Why BMI Alone Should Not Guide Medical Decision Making

http://www.drsharma.ca/more-evidence-why-bmi-alone-should-not-guide-medical-decision-making.html
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby simonn » Thu Oct 24, 2013 1:28 pm

casual_cyclist wrote:More Evidence Why BMI Alone Should Not Guide Medical Decision Making

http://www.drsharma.ca/more-evidence-why-bmi-alone-should-not-guide-medical-decision-making.html



Who Is Saying That BMI Alone Should Be A Guide To Medical Decision Making
Image
User avatar
simonn
 
Posts: 3599
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Sydney

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby sogood » Thu Oct 24, 2013 2:02 pm

LOL! Desperation. No medico would make decisions by a single test indicator, but would always seek corroborating and potential contrary evidences that are relevant to a set of circumstance.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby queequeg » Thu Oct 24, 2013 2:03 pm

simonn wrote:*On another note, I bought a slim-fit suit recently and had to go up a waist size because my clearly massive quads were causing the pockets to flare out weirdly :), huzzah!


Same here...I had to replace all my jeans recently and I had to go up three waist sizes to get a pair that my quads fitted into! It makes it a bit tricky when I forget to pack a belt onto my bad!
'11 Lynskey Cooper CX, '00 Hillbrick Steel Racing (Total Rebuild '10), '09 Electra Townie Original 21D
User avatar
queequeg
 
Posts: 2858
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:09 am

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby trailgumby » Thu Oct 24, 2013 7:16 pm

queequeg wrote:
simonn wrote:*On another note, I bought a slim-fit suit recently and had to go up a waist size because my clearly massive quads were causing the pockets to flare out weirdly :), huzzah!


Same here...I had to replace all my jeans recently and I had to go up three waist sizes to get a pair that my quads fitted into! It makes it a bit tricky when I forget to pack a belt onto my bad!

I have that problem with suits as well.
"People have a right to their own opinions, but not their own facts. Evidence must be located, not created, and opinions not backed by evidence cannot be given much weight." -- James W Loewen

http://www.facebook.com/Drive2WorkDay
User avatar
trailgumby
 
Posts: 10305
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:30 pm
Location: Northern Beaches, Sydney

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby skull » Thu Oct 24, 2013 7:34 pm

trailgumby wrote:I have that problem with suits as well.


bespoke fixes that problem.
User avatar
skull
 
Posts: 1676
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:48 pm

Re: My girlfriend getting too thin?

Postby casual_cyclist » Thu Oct 24, 2013 8:12 pm

sogood wrote:LOL! Desperation. No medico would make decisions by a single test indicator, but would always seek corroborating and potential contrary evidences that are relevant to a set of circumstance.

You are hilarious! I know for a fact this definitely does not always happen. Generalising much?
<removed by request>
User avatar
casual_cyclist
 
Posts: 7328
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Kewdale

PreviousNext

Return to Cycling Health

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers
> BNA Cycling Kit