The difference a few degrees makes

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The difference a few degrees makes

Postby worzel » Fri Jan 17, 2014 3:16 pm

I am cycling 32km each way to work twice per week plus weekend bimbles with my wife etc on my flat bar commuter bike and been suffering with hand cramps, back ache, knee soreness and most of all, a sore under carriage. I had a bit of a go at setting the bike up properly when I got it (internet from Cell Bikes) in October and thought it was okay when I got the seat height right but I think it may have slipped a bit over time, in particular being a bit nose-up. But I had a play with the seat last night and pushed it back a little / pushed the nose down and what a difference it made this morning. I am now sitting on my cheeks rather than Tom and Harry and it was soooo much nicer.

I don't know whether this is related, but I ended up with pins and needles in my toes instead. More pressure on my feet if my backside is not supported quite as well or am I just pushing harder as I get fitter?

And maybe it was because of the 15-20 knot head wind or no carbs for 2 days but it seemed a real struggle this morning. Would pointing too far down impact leverage?
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by BNA » Fri Jan 17, 2014 4:33 pm

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Re: The difference a few degrees makes

Postby sogood » Fri Jan 17, 2014 4:33 pm

Bike saddles are not meant to be "sat" on like a sofa for hours on end. It's more of an anchor and connection point and you should lift your bottom every so often. Over time, your "bottom" will also toughen up.
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Re: The difference a few degrees makes

Postby greyhoundtom » Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:34 pm

worzel wrote:I am cycling 32km each way to work twice per week plus weekend bimbles with my wife etc on my flat bar commuter bike and been suffering with hand cramps, back ache, knee soreness and most of all, a sore under carriage. I had a bit of a go at setting the bike up properly when I got it (internet from Cell Bikes) in October and thought it was okay when I got the seat height right but I think it may have slipped a bit over time, in particular being a bit nose-up. But I had a play with the seat last night and pushed it back a little / pushed the nose down and what a difference it made this morning. I am now sitting on my cheeks rather than Tom and Harry and it was soooo much nicer.

I don't know whether this is related, but I ended up with pins and needles in my toes instead. More pressure on my feet if my backside is not supported quite as well or am I just pushing harder as I get fitter?

And maybe it was because of the 15-20 knot head wind or no carbs for 2 days but it seemed a real struggle this morning. Would pointing too far down impact leverage?

Mate going by your post you have suffered from a really bad bike setup that has caused far too many problems. Time to seek some professional advice and get a proper bike set up before you do yourself a permanent injury as just adjusting the saddle a bit without really knowing what is right or wrong is not going to do the job.
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Re: The difference a few degrees makes

Postby Squigs » Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:15 am

Once you get your bike setup how you want it, get a whiteout pen and mark on your seatpost, seat rails and bars where they are positioned so if they do slip you can put them back to where you had them.
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Re: The difference a few degrees makes

Postby Nobody » Sat Jan 18, 2014 11:41 am

greyhoundtom wrote:Mate going by your post you have suffered from a really bad bike setup that has caused far too many problems. Time to seek some professional advice and get a proper bike set up before you do yourself a permanent injury as just adjusting the saddle a bit without really knowing what is right or wrong is not going to do the job.
+1.

WorzeI, I suspect you have the wrong sized bike. A common problem when buying online without knowing your correct bike fit. A bike fitter should be able to tell you.

worzel wrote:And maybe it was because of the 15-20 knot head wind or no carbs for 2 days but it seemed a real struggle this morning.
It should be a stuggle if you're not eating carbs which are the easiest form of energy for the body to process into energy. Also what you are substituting the carbs with could be causing you long-term harm. If you want to lose weight and keep it off I suggest you try a vegan diet. I lost about 10Kg over 3 months and have kept it off. Now correct weight for height. At 46 it shouldn't be so easy to do, but it is.

worzel wrote:Would pointing too far down impact leverage?
Not so much leverage, but it should put more weight onto your hands to prevent you sliding off the saddle. In most cases the saddle should be level.
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