Plant Based Diet Thread

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Nobody
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:22 am

Yes lead is still a problem even though it was removed from petrol and house paint. Earlier house plumbing was soldered with lead AFAIK. Brass taps contain lead too. I filter my drinking and cooking water, but I don't know how effective that is. So we have a choice of either lead from the tap or plastic residue from bottled water. Neither are good choices IMO. Older people are more likely to have lead stored in their bones from what I've heard/read.
https://www.safeplumbing.org/health-saf ... n-plumbing

As for iron, yes green leafy and cast iron pans are known to be sources. I've just finished a 6 month period test to find the iron in beans doesn't absorb well for me, which is good in my case but may be problematic for others. I've proven green leafy is something I can't eat from the period tests. I've heard that mechanics with haemochromatosis have trouble keeping their iron levels down, so most likely absorbing through skin. Although I still boil in a stainless pot (my lined aluminium pot was difficult to use IMO and titanium is expensive) I have a ceramic knife and titanium cutlery to avoid even those minor sources. I may get a titanium pot eventually. I also generally wear gloves when working with steel. The cancer risk is probably the biggest problem with higher ferritin levels. I'd like to go low for ferritin level, but it looks like the specialist won't let me.
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/donating-blood-to-prevent-cancer/

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby mikesbytes » Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:31 pm

Nobody I commend you on your dedication to refine your diet to what is perfection for you. It's not easy to get the optimum point especially as your genetics (or whatever) makes it even more challenging. So many people have issues, are advised as to what to do with the issue and do nothing about it and you are the complete opposite, not only are you doing the best that you can but you are reviewing what you have done so to improve again.

The protein thing is a bit more complicated as the levels are dependent on when they were consumed, the absorption speed of the medium by which they were consumed and the timing of the test. All of which I know you have considered in analysing the results. And while generically I agree with march83 on the numbers being low, the bigger issue is knowing the amount to fit your lifestyle and the timing of the delivery. Though I only have a rough idea on your lifestyle I suspect that 1.1gms/kilo LBM will do the trick but as we all know its also about the timing of the delivery, so make sure its evenly (or close enough) spread over the meals. Hey it also wouldn't hurt to use a protein supplement until you have your food selection sorted.
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Sun Jun 18, 2017 1:05 pm

mikesbytes wrote:Nobody I commend you on your dedication to refine your diet to what is perfection for you. It's not easy to get the optimum point especially as your genetics (or whatever) makes it even more challenging.

Thanks. I find winter even more challenging as I now regularly break out in hives/eczema on the back of my fingers. I find it's usually driven by an intolerance to many foods, to varying degrees. I keep a written log of what I eat and reactions. Beans are one of them, so I've just decided to stop eating them again, now the beans test period is over. I'll up my oats and peas to compensate and see what happens.

mikesbytes wrote:...So many people have issues, are advised as to what to do with the issue and do nothing about it and you are the complete opposite, not only are you doing the best that you can but you are reviewing what you have done so to improve again.

I can't see a better way for me to move forward. I'm just taking the logical approach.

People doing nothing about issues to me shows an emotional reaction. As much as we like to think we are logical, I observe that people (including me) are primarily emotional beings in the way we respond to many problems. That's why I don't really promote plant only eating in real life. Almost no one is worth the effort because they won't change from a logical presentation of facts. All it usually brings me is grief.

mikesbytes wrote:The protein thing is a bit more complicated as the levels are dependent on when they were consumed, the absorption speed of the medium by which they were consumed and the timing of the test. All of which I know you have considered in analysing the results.

I left out a piece of information previously. My last blood test posted was only about 16 hours after my last ride, where the previous tests were usually at least a day and a half after my last ride. That is why the protein levels probably look similar even though my protein intake has increased. I'll try to keep the tests to 16 hours or so after rides in future to keep results more consistent and indicative.

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CKinnard
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby CKinnard » Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:46 pm

Nobody, I am back at True North for a few months.
I was just looking at your bloods.

Re LFTs, they give a picture of
- liver synthesis (albumin and globulin)
albumin is the prime protein in the blood, responsible for osmotic pressure.
as you seem to be aware it can be urinated off significantly with exercise, especially more strenuous, so the guideline is not to do bloods for at least 24 hours after exercise.
globulin are immune molecules. if these are elevated, there's infection, inflammation, cancer.
Total protein is just the sum of these two. You have a very healthily low level of globulin, and your albumin level is within range. As a test, I'd suggest for your next blood test, you don't exercise for 2 days before, and no strenuous exercise for 4 days at least. This will give you some insight into your body's ability to rebuild albumin levels post exercise.
- liver excretion (bilirubin)
low indicates bile being processed well, there is not an excess, bile ducts are open, no stone in common bile duct.
- liver inflammation (AST, ALT)
these spill out of liver cells with liver cell inflammation.


Re other asterisks
MCH is average Hb in each RBC.
Low urea is fine and indicates you don't have excessive dietatry protein load and your kidneys are excreting well. Creatinine is a waste product from muscle activity and a low value confirms kidneys are excreting well.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:02 pm

CKinnard wrote:Nobody, I am back at True North for a few months.

I remember you said you were going there. You've been quieter than usual, so I thought that was the reason. How's the fasting going? How long are you staying this time?

CKinnard wrote:Re LFTs, they give a picture of
- liver synthesis (albumin and globulin)
albumin is the prime protein in the blood, responsible for osmotic pressure.
as you seem to be aware it can be urinated off significantly with exercise, especially more strenuous, so the guideline is not to do bloods for at least 24 hours after exercise.
globulin are immune molecules. if these are elevated, there's infection, inflammation, cancer.
Total protein is just the sum of these two. You have a very healthily low level of globulin, and your albumin level is within range. As a test, I'd suggest for your next blood test, you don't exercise for 2 days before, and no strenuous exercise for 4 days at least. This will give you some insight into your body's ability to rebuild albumin levels post exercise.
- liver excretion (bilirubin)
low indicates bile being processed well, there is not an excess, bile ducts are open, no stone in common bile duct.
- liver inflammation (AST, ALT)
these spill out of liver cells with liver cell inflammation.


Thanks for the description. As you know, LFTs are important to me (and the specialist) since the liver is the organ that takes the biggest hit from haemochromatosis.

Point taken about the exercise. I was trying to establish if the higher protein was working. The level might have been OK after 24 hours, since it was only just under.

CKinnard wrote:Re other asterisks
MCH is average Hb in each RBC.
Low urea is fine and indicates you don't have excessive dietatry protein load and your kidneys are excreting well. Creatinine is a waste product from muscle activity and a low value confirms kidneys are excreting well.

Good to know all appears well. It should be interesting to see what the next results are like that I get on 1st Aug. Hopefully ferritin is up this time so I can get bled and lose the high saturation. The blood is being analysed this time at a different company. So I might get quite different results. This sample is also < 24 hours after exercise.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby CKinnard » Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:22 pm

Nobody, am here for 2 months for which I am working the whole time.
I may extend for a fast up to 14 days and refeed of 7.
I do AM and PM rounds taking vitals and making minor changes to diet as per protocols, so get to know the residents well.
I also accompany doctors on their rounds after I finish vitals and grow more impressed with the profundity of experience here in guiding people through fasting or PBWF diet.

I am primary intern for Michael Klaper tomorrow morning. He's absolutely brilliant to shadow. Not a fake or pretentious bone in his body and by far the most experienced medical doctor here with fasting. He's falling behind in keeping up with the literature, but his clinical judgement is unsurpassed. Actually no doctor can keep up with the literature today....which is why nutritionfacts.com is so valuable.

Incidentally, Renae who you and I talked about earlier this year (young Aussie female doctor) has a research residency at Loma Linda university for next 3 years. That is an excellent career choice to consolidate as an authority in plant based nutrition.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Super Commuter » Wed Jul 05, 2017 5:10 pm

Hi all

Re-lapsed member here, coming off a few years off the bike due to family illness (my wife's cancer - now in remission for some time) stuffing up our lives. A bit over a couple of months ago, my father passed away. He had Alzheimer's, T2 diabetes, back pain, cardiovascular disease (stent) and died after a large stroke. When he was my age and since he had high cholesterol so a recent blood test which showed the same in me had me wanting to avoid the same fate. Evidence suggests that cholesterol could have played a role in all these diseases... all my grandparents had also died from variants of heart disease (heart attack, stroke) in their late 60s / early 70s as well so I know I can't muck around.

So I thought I would check back on this forum to see what was the latest in the world of cycling to get back into it. But I was quickly reminded of something I remembered from cycling previously - lots of people doing bulk miles but not losing the weight they wanted to. This was my story too when I was previously cycling despite a regular commute - the cycling would stop me putting weight on but I couldn't lose the weight I needed to either. I tried 5:2 fasting, low-carb, low calorie and a few other diets but couldn't stick with them long term mainly due to chronic hunger - they just didn't "feel right" for different reasons.

So I checked out the diet threads for the latest and found this one. This put me on to Greger's website, and then onto Barnard, McDougall, Fuhrmann, Klaper, Ornish, etc etc. I sucked up information and have to say it was all quite convincing due to a number of other life experiences I won't bore you with.

After seeing the weight of all this evidence and following the grief of losing Dad (who was desperately searching for solutions to his health problems his whole life but WFPB just never occurred to him), I just went cold turkey on to WFPB with B12 and Vit D etc. What did I have to lose? I may as well give it a red hot go - it's the only way to know whether it would be right for me. So, over the last two and a bit months, together with the commute, I have:

- Dropped from 87kg to 78kg - I'm 41 and I haven't been this weight since my early 20s despite much effort
- More energy, sleep better
- No food cravings whatsoever - don't miss animal foods at all when previously I was a dairy (milk, cheeeeese....) and meat addict
- Become a better cyclist - less out of breath, faster recovery etc
- Much improved mood and outlook on life (borderline depression for nearly a decade up until then)

Need to check my blood pressure and blood lipids - hope they have dropped. Anyway, I feel I have found a weight management and lifestyle intervention that really works for me and makes me feel much healthier. It is clear that for me, both diet and exercise are required for health but the greater of these is diet. The rest of my family are now moving in this direction as well and seeing similar improvements - particularly my wife.

So I just wanted to say thank you to the people in this thread who put me on to this. I am very grateful...

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Thu Jul 06, 2017 11:56 am

Hi Super Commuter. Thanks for posting. It's nice to get some feedback that the diet threads are helping some. :)

Super Commuter wrote:...I was quickly reminded of something I remembered from cycling previously - lots of people doing bulk miles but not losing the weight they wanted to. This was my story too when I was previously cycling despite a regular commute - the cycling would stop me putting weight on but I couldn't lose the weight I needed to either.

My experience also. I wasn't obese on a standard diet, but even at my middle age lightest I was still 5 kg above the ideal. Which is a common problem. I remember going to a naturopath when I was about 80+ kg and told my ideal weight for height was 70 kg. I didn't believe I could get to it at the time. Now I'm about 65 kg without restriction.

Super Commuter wrote:After seeing the weight of all this evidence and following the grief of losing Dad (who was desperately searching for solutions to his health problems his whole life but WFPB just never occurred to him), I just went cold turkey on to WFPB with B12 and Vit D etc. What did I have to lose? I may as well give it a red hot go - it's the only way to know whether it would be right for me.

It's nice to hear of people who can see past their food addictions and cultural/social norms to try WFPB long enough to benefit. The majority that know about WFPB can't.

Super Commuter wrote:So, over the last two and a bit months, together with the commute, I have:

- Dropped from 87kg to 78kg - I'm 41 and I haven't been this weight since my early 20s despite much effort
- More energy, sleep better
- No food cravings whatsoever - don't miss animal foods at all when previously I was a dairy (milk, cheeeeese....) and meat addict
- Become a better cyclist - less out of breath, faster recovery etc
- Much improved mood and outlook on life (borderline depression for nearly a decade up until then)

Similar to me. Improved mood, bike performance and energy/sleep were the main three I noticed.


Super Commuter wrote:Need to check my blood pressure and blood lipids - hope they have dropped. Anyway, I feel I have found a weight management and lifestyle intervention that really works for me and makes me feel much healthier. It is clear that for me, both diet and exercise are required for health but the greater of these is diet. The rest of my family are now moving in this direction as well and seeing similar improvements - particularly my wife.

I'd be surprised if your blood pressure and lipids haven't dropped. As you may know, mine dropped 43% for total cholesterol, which is about as far as GPs ever expect people to drop from a standard diet.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Super Commuter » Thu Jul 06, 2017 5:20 pm

Hi Nobody - thank you again for everything you have done in this and similar threads...

Nobody wrote:My experience also. I wasn't obese on a standard diet, but even at my middle age lightest I was still 5 kg above the ideal. Which is a common problem. I remember going to a naturopath when I was about 80+ kg and told my ideal weight for height was 70 kg. I didn't believe I could get to it at the time. Now I'm about 65 kg without restriction.


70kg is my target weight at 6ft. I don't mind if it takes another year or two to get there - at least I know the trend is now down rather than up. And I'm not hungry...!

Nobody wrote:It's nice to hear of people who can see past their food addictions and cultural/social norms to try WFPB long enough to benefit. The majority that know about WFPB can't.


Funny you should say that as I've been into BBQ'ing for the last 10 or so years - on the internet forums, bought the kamado, etc etc. Worked in well with the young family - low n slow pulled pork, ribs, fish, lamb shoulder, you name it. Together with the milk and the cheese etc (used to smoke my own cheddar!) it all tasted nice and I would be happy to go back to it otherwise. I grew up in an Italian house hold where food was extremely important - but there is so much more to life than food...

I have seen first hand in Dad the early reduction in quality of life from diabetes, Alzheimer's, stroke, etc. Grieving family, missed time with grand kids, early disability, frustration, anger, despair. I would do anything to reduce my risk of that and for those who I love. Giving up the BBQ and dairy is a pathetically small price to pay by comparison. Although there are plenty of veg dishes that I will still be trying on the BBQ come summer...

I only wish I knew about all this evidence earlier. I was drinking the "everything in moderation" Kool-aid instead. But Dad died from that approach - he had moderate diabetes, moderate heart disease, moderate Alzheimers. The reality of these diseases does not call for moderation...

Nobody wrote:I'd be surprised if your blood pressure and lipids haven't dropped. As you may know, mine dropped 43% for total cholesterol, which is about as far as GPs ever expect people to drop from a standard diet.


Great result! I'll give it another couple of months before getting tested again...

For me, the other things I am loving about WFPB / exercise are:
- Not being hungry! No food addictions / cravings anymore - can't overstate that one... such a PITA otherwise!
- It's simple.
- It's completely sustainable for the long term.
- It puts you into a world of new things to eat that I always knew I should have been eating anyway but never found time or room for them in my diet. eg I've always loved beans but never got around to cooking them much before - now dried beans are a staple and there are so many of them! Variety of food has paradoxically increased by necessity as much as anything else...
- Then there is the spices - when everything stops being swamped in sugar, fat and salt you actually start using more spices and tasting things again...
- I must also say that constipation is definitely a concern of the past. I always thought I had a reasonable amount of fibre in my diet (bran etc) but now that I actually do have the right amount I have discovered how my bowels were always meant to be working!

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby ball bearing » Thu Jul 06, 2017 7:10 pm

Super Commuter wrote:I have seen first hand in Dad the early reduction in quality of life from diabetes, Alzheimer's, stroke, etc. Grieving family, missed time with grand kids, early disability, frustration, anger, despair. I would do anything to reduce my risk of that and for those who I love. Giving up the BBQ and dairy is a pathetically small price to pay by comparison. Although there are plenty of veg dishes that I will still be trying on the BBQ come summer...


How refreshing to see someone so awake and self-aware.

My family experiences are a mirror of yours. Everyone in my childhood family either died young or suffers from a myriad of diseases. The premise that our genes determine whether we will develop particular diseases is so overblown - what is inherited that causes disease is an unhealthy diet.

I only wish I knew about all this evidence earlier. I was drinking the "everything in moderation" Kool-aid instead. But Dad died from that approach - he had moderate diabetes, moderate heart disease, moderate Alzheimers. The reality of these diseases does not call for moderation...



This is the big one. The phrase should correctly be, "All things in moderation", which is entirely different to, "Everything in moderation", which is marketing doublespeak and denies that there are inherently unhealthy foods.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:41 am

Super Commuter wrote:Hi Nobody - thank you again for everything you have done in this and similar threads...

You're welcome. :)
In turn, I thank CKinnard for his expert input and others that have positively contributed.

Super Commuter wrote:Although there are plenty of veg dishes that I will still be trying on the BBQ come summer...

BBQing would need to be at lower temperatures if you want to avoid the production of acrylamide.

Super Commuter wrote:I only wish I knew about all this evidence earlier. I was drinking the "everything in moderation" Kool-aid instead. But Dad died from that approach - he had moderate diabetes, moderate heart disease, moderate Alzheimers. The reality of these diseases does not call for moderation...

Yes, my father had a stroke last year and my mother died of leukemia the year before. I would be healthier now if I'd changed in my mid 20s rather than my mid 40s.
In regard to moderation, for those who don't know:
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/everything-in-moderation-even-heart-disease/
http://www.dresselstyn.com/site/study05/

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Super Commuter » Fri Jul 07, 2017 1:39 pm

Nobody wrote:BBQing would need to be at lower temperatures if you want to avoid the production of acrylamide.


Yep - this is a gas bbq's weak point - none of them are very good at doing low temps for a long time because of flame stability. Their lowest setting is still too hot. I can highly recommend a charcoal kamado with a flame deflector for that - I've done 16-24 hour cooks with those at only a bit over 100 degrees. Effectively sous vide by barbecue - build a pile of charcoal on the fire grate and light the top few pieces, set the vents to a match width and away you go. The double lined and insulated steel Chargriller Akorn kamado at Bunnings was my choice - it's the cheapest and the most insulated (efficient) out there.

I look forward to some low n slow beans, slow roast spicy spuds (no oil!) and slow roast veg kebabs, all followed by a bit of wholemeal bread baking, or some vegan pizza!

Oh and sweet corn cooked in its own husk is to die for.....

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby mikesbytes » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:01 pm

Hi Super Commuter, I posted a congratulations for you a couple of days :) and the dam post isn't appearing :( I must upgrade to NBN :wink:

Interesting conversation about cooking temperatures, I looked up this page on Arcylamide and its suggesting some reasonably high maximum temperatures for frying and baking. Its also suggesting soaking veges in cold water first, this is a suggestion I haven't come upon before.

I'm wondering with the BBQ cooking if the style of the cooker leads to a higher touch surface where Arcylamide can form, while the temperature of the food as a whole is much lower, ie its difficult to BBQ at a temperature that cooks the food without over cooking the bottom surface. And this makes me wonder if there's a trick to come into play to circumvent this problem. Two ideas come to mind, would either of these or both tip the balance?
1. The teflon sheets that can be used to do oil free cooking
2. Adding a lid over the food and then turning it down (assuming the BBQ can be turned that far down)

I've always had a distrust of slow cooking, I'm concerned about the potential for bacterial growth. Google is telling me it isn't a problem providing the temperature is within the correct boundaries though the pages I saw were more akin to the other diet thread.
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Super Commuter » Sat Jul 08, 2017 9:15 pm

Hi mikesbytes

A few things:
- When I say "BBQ" I mean in the American sense - ie an enclosed outdoor cooker. This is the term used on the BBQ forums - what Australians typically call a BBQ is more accurately termed a "grill".
- Proper enclosed BBQs allow you to do indirect cooking, where the flame / heat source is not "directly" under the food. This removes the problem you mention of over cooking the underneath. In a kamado you add a heat deflector between the fire and the food. In a Weber kettle you put the food on one side and the fire on the other side - or the food in the middle and the fire on each side so the food is never over the fire. Hooded gas BBQs allow you to put deflectors in as well (eg you put foil under the food in a Weber Q) but I don't like them - charcoal is much better IMO mainly because the physics of keeping gas burners alight means they can't turn down low enough.
- So there is no higher touch surface anywhere if you do it properly. I don't like teflon sheets and have always found better alternatives (eg cast iron for those of us with normal iron levels or are slightly anemic...)
- The science of slow cooking is well established. Check out the sous vide temp / time charts for all the food safety information on different foods - they show you how long you have cook to be safe at different temperatures for different foods. These charts are what commercial operators have to use. Higher temps mean the bacteria die quickly - lower temps (but still above 60 degrees) they die slowly and the charts tell you how long you have to hold different foods at a certain temp to be completely safe.
- The idea with food safety is to stay out of the "danger zone" approx 5-60 degrees C - keeping food above 60 degrees is just as safe as keeping it in the fridge - this is the theory behind a bain marie for example although temperature control in a bain marie isn't perfect and of course there is still an impact on the quality of the food!
- I use a food thermometer with a separate probe for the BBQ so I know the temp in the cooker and when the food has reached a safe temperature. They come with alarms etc for long slow cooks. Some wood pellet BBQs for example have the ability to cook at (whatever temp you like) say 110 degrees until the food reaches 95 degrees and then back off to 95 degrees and hold the food at that temp until you get home... they come with a wi-fi app so you can monitor the cook at work and change the temps if you want. I don't go quite that far but there are a lot of cool (hot!) options out there... effectively a BBQ version of sous vide.
- I've done a bit of research into pre-soaking veg (and particularly beans) and there seems to be a lot of urban myths (eg flatulence etc) - all the scientific research I've seen says that it really makes no difference to anything.
- By the way, if you're worried about food safety then don't eat chicken! Handling raw chicken and then something else is the biggest food poisoning problem in the kitchen by a very long way.
https://www.food.gov.uk/news-updates/ca ... r/fsw-2014
Cooking it to temp kills the bacteria but washing it in the sink often means a greater concentration of bacteria in your sink than in your toilet...
https://nutritionfacts.org/2014/01/28/h ... nfections/

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby mikesbytes » Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:15 am

Thanks Mate, didn't know the term BBQ was being used differently in Aus than the US. That makes a lot of sense that your effectively baking rather than frying.

So the simple answer to the slow cooking is that if its above 60degC then the bacterial count won't increase. The higher the temperature then the quicker that the existing bacteria die. However with plant products that shouldn't be an issue as the bacteria count is already low enough anyway.
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Sat Jul 22, 2017 11:17 pm


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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby CKinnard » Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:29 pm

Into my last week at True North.
I have spent many hours working alongside Michael Klaper, and many talking with Alan Goldhamer, and have been in the thick of operations and therapy at True North.
I've been offered a sponsored working visa here for several years, but am undecided.
Said my goodbyes to Doc K today as he is off yet again to deliver keynote addresses at several large events in Washington DC. It is humbling to see how many speeches the doctors here are giving across the US. They are serious movers and shakers in PBWF education and advocacy.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Thu Jul 27, 2017 4:24 pm

CKinnard wrote:I've been offered a sponsored working visa here for several years, but am undecided.

That's a difficult choice. Especially later in life.

CKinnard wrote:Said my goodbyes to Doc K today as he is off yet again to deliver keynote addresses at several large events in Washington DC. It is humbling to see how many speeches the doctors here are giving across the US. They are serious movers and shakers in PBWF education and advocacy.

Nice to see they are getting plenty of opportunities to make a difference.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The recent series about arsenic from Greger ends with the implication that in our arsenic polluted world, avoiding rice may be the safest action to take.

The arsenic series in order:
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/where-does-the-arsenic-in-chicken-come-from/
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/where-does-the-arsenic-in-rice-mushrooms-and-wine-come-from/
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-effects-of-too-much-arsenic-in-the-diet/
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/cancer-risk-from-arsenic-in-rice-and-seaweed/
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-rice-has-less-arsenic-black-brown-red-white-or-wild/

I'm glad I gave up eating brown rice some months ago.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Tue Aug 01, 2017 6:13 pm

Below is an update on my blood iron loading problem.

Well it took a while, but it appears I have achieved my goal of no longer needing venesections (bleedings). To be honest, I didn't know that someone with haemochromatosis could get to the level of ferritin I'm at of 31 ug/L (range: 30 - 300). The one thing I changed and got such a big drop in ferritin - from of 91 to 34 in 6 months - was by supplementing about 12mg of zinc daily before eating, since zinc competes with the absorption of iron. Something worth trying if you have the same problem. The specialist said they are just going to monitor me with the next blood test due in 6 months. I'll probably get another iron studies blood test in 3 months, since it looks like I may be in danger of going too low now. However I'm confident I can easily raise it by reducing zinc supplementation and/or adding some green leafy veg. My new goal is finding a balance at the new low level. My previous specialist said diet didn't make any difference. Well so far I've proven it does in my case. :D

Blood test results below are non-fasting. That's because they took the blood on the day I was denied the venesection for low ferritin. They are from a different lab to previous posted results. Previous ferritin was 34 ug/L a week before. Saturation was 48% a week before, which is a very different result to below.

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mikesbytes
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby mikesbytes » Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:32 pm

Well done Nobody, your dedication has paid off!
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Baalzamon » Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:56 pm

Good job on the levels Nobody. Also someone else on a facebook feed cured 3 blood clots with diet, didn't say what and stunned the specialists who haven't seen anything like that before. Real food is healing.
But I'm reading a new book "The Salt Fix" and your sodium is a bit on the low side. 135 mmol/l to 145 mmol/l is considered normal. That is from dr google btw
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:35 pm

Thanks guys. :)

Baalz you are right about the sodium. The blood for these results was taken about 23 hours after a 1.5 hour ride. I should be eating celery after rides. It's in the fridge, I just need to remember to eat it. :oops:

Yes, real food is healing. And the worse our chronic problems are, the more potential there usually is for benefit by dietary change. If MDs were taught the benefits of good diet, much suffering from chronic illnesses could be reduced or avoided. A few MDs might get taught from the results some of us get. But obviously there are better ways to teach if the medical profession's academics encouraged good dietary education, like Kaiser Permanente.
http://www.thepermanentejournal.org/issues/2013/spring/5117-nutrition.html

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby Nobody » Thu Aug 03, 2017 1:25 pm


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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby CKinnard » Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:45 pm

Nobody wrote:Below is an update on my blood iron loading problem.

Well it took a while, but it appears I have achieved my goal of no longer needing venesections (bleedings). To be honest, I didn't know that someone with haemochromatosis could get to the level of ferritin I'm at of 31 ug/L (range: 30 - 300). The one thing I changed and got such a big drop in ferritin - from of 91 to 34 in 6 months - was by supplementing about 12mg of zinc daily before eating, since zinc competes with the absorption of iron. Something worth trying if you have the same problem.


Congratulations on that Nobody.
Personally and professionally, I think that is absolutely astounding.
You have motivated me to research haemochroma.... to see what conservative therapies are available.
If what you have done is unusual, I'll get your story to the TNH docs.
Your meticulous approach to data tracking will underscore the results, and maybe your GP could be enticed to write up a case study report.

It would be interesting to do a gene tracking study of haemo sufferers, and relate that back to their traditional diet.

I don't know if I mentioned it to you yet, but while at TNH (got back to Oz last Friday), I did a lot of massage and mobilization of the viscera as an intervention for nausea and vomiting, reflux, distended gut, impacted intestines....(I had experimented with this in Oz years ago on spinal injuries patients with hypomotility issues, and great results. At TNH, I also had excellent results, and patients talked it up to the docs. It was really that work that led to the visa offer.

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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby march83 » Mon Aug 07, 2017 2:18 pm

FWIW, I had a note on my last blood tests which showed a decreased haematocrit (typically 0.42-44 down to 0.39) and moderately high iron levels that said i needed further investigation to rule out genetic haemochromatosis. I haven't followed these up as they weren't that long ago and I had been exercising that day prior to the test so I figured I should do a clean, "rested" test before doing anything dramatic. My serum zinc levels were OK, but I've done some tracking in chronometer and I'm typically only getting 10-15mg of dietary zinc which seem OK by the RDIs, but from what I understand my absorption may be compromised by the phytates (lots of beans) and tannins (lots of tea and coffee) I'm eating. Additionally, my requirements may be amplified due to pretty significant sweat losses.

So, taking the simplest approach, I'm currently supplementing zinc with meals and I'll see what happens at the next round of blood tests.

Nobody wrote:My previous specialist said diet didn't make any difference. Well so far I've proven it does in my case. :D


What an incredible statement from your specialist...

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