roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

yanjarra
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roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby yanjarra » Wed Dec 02, 2015 10:23 pm

Hi all,

I am a roadie looking at getting my first MTB which i intend to use every now and then for something different on some local brisbane trails, and if the bug bites might get into some longer enduro type events and what not.

I am looking at purchasing a Lapierre xr 529 dual full carbon with the ei brain system for the rear shock. http://www.lapierrebikes.com.au/2016/xr-529-ei-shock

At $2900 for the 2015 model on clearance sale at the moment I am thinking its not a bad buy and starting point. They seem to have good reviews but have also read of some frame cracking issues. Has anyone had any experience with these and am I on the right track with looking at something along these lines as my first mtb or should there be something else I should consider?

Is there anything else unique with MTB'ing i should really be looking for or considering? Im guessing a new pair of MTB pedals and cleats will be needed...whats a good starting point there?


One other thing.....I am just about to receive a power meter for my road bike and start getting into that. Is it essential that I will need to get a power meter for the MTB now too? I'm thinking the performance chart manager and stuff wont be accurate if you aren't logging the training stress garnered while riding the MTB. As I said though Im not anticipating being on it anywhere near as much as the roadie so maybe I can get away without needing one?


cheers in advance...

matt

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby silentbutdeadly » Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:05 pm

Forget power meter. Do an MTB skills course. Nice bike but a lot of bike! Deore XT is always the answer. Have fun...
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby bychosis » Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:21 pm

+1. Nice looking bike, certainly a higher spec for a beginner, but nothing wrong with that - it's your money. Forget the power meter, MTB is for fun.

An XC bike like that will be less forgiving in the rough stuff for a beginner that a trail based bike for example, but if you aren't hitting the roughest trails or going for big air etc it should be fine. The next bracket of 'trail' bike (between XC and all mountain) will be more fun and forgiving, but you'll lose a bit of efficiency for your proposed enduro events.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby Duck! » Thu Dec 03, 2015 8:37 am

yanjarra wrote: Is it essential that I will need to get a power meter for the MTB now too? I'm thinking the performance chart manager and stuff wont be accurate if you aren't logging the training stress garnered while riding the MTB. As I said though Im not anticipating being on it anywhere near as much as the roadie so maybe I can get away without needing one?

Absolutely not essential, and in fact probably detrimental to start with, as your attention will be on the wrong thing. Learning to ride the thing properly first will be much more beneficial.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby ianganderton » Thu Dec 03, 2015 9:54 am

silentbutdeadly wrote:Deore XT is always the answer.


This
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby mtb1011 » Fri Dec 04, 2015 11:55 am

I am a roadie looking at getting my first MTB which i intend to use every now and then for something different on some local brisbane trails, and if the bug bites might get into some longer enduro type events and what not.

I am looking at purchasing a Lapierre xr 529 dual full carbon with the ei brain system for the rear shock. http://www.lapierrebikes.com.au/2016/xr-529-ei-shock


depends a bit on your riding style how fit you are etc., if you're a accomplished roadie then - weight wise the lapie will be a pig to ride hard if you're used to the responsiveness of a road bike. especially climbing.

I'd be looking for something under 12kgs with a bit more conventional rear shock design, would want a lifetime warranty on frame as full sus bikes have a lot of components to wear etc. would want xt level shifters, groupset,

Is there anything else unique with MTB'ing i should really be looking for or considering? Im guessing a new pair of MTB pedals and cleats will be needed...whats a good starting point there?

you're going to have issues if first time mtbing with roadie fitness as the speed you can go will be countered by the technical requirements a mtb places on you.

need to really work on low speed balance and clipping out until you can read terrain and take the right line to maintain momentum and flow, its an art that takes a good 18 months to develop. I"m saying this cause you already ride road so should have good fitness.

anyway crank brother eggbeater pedals are nice easy to clip out/in.

One other thing.....I am just about to receive a power meter for my road bike and start getting into that. Is it essential that I will need to get a power meter for the MTB now too? I'm thinking the performance chart manager and stuff wont be accurate if you aren't logging the training stress garnered while riding the MTB. As I said though Im not anticipating being on it anywhere near as much as the roadie so maybe I can get away without needing one?


again if you're aiming at elite levels of course a power meter presents the bottom line on your power outputs, not essential however for most of us, you'd be surprised how much technical ability can really determine how fast you can get in and out of single track and how much energy it takes on upper body if not efficient.

good luck.

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby ianganderton » Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:30 pm

Something that always gets missed is how the bike fits this is much more important than specification (that's easy as XT is always right [emoji41] )

My suggestion has always been to go to as many bike shops as possible and ride as many different brands AND styles of bikes as possible. Around the block will do for starters. This is always really interesting and enlightening. If you can demo a bike on actual trails then obviously this is a good thing.

The main thing I notice is how much the top tube length varies between bikes. I have always preferred a longer tt. Tidies the necessarily work that you can adjust this by varying the stem length as this significantly changed the handling (mainly steering speed), something more important on a Mtb than on a road bike imo

When you go into the shops have an idea of what type of riding you want to be doing

To decide what wheel size I my suggestion is to look at your cycling heroes. If it's the TDF peloton or velodrome posse I'd suggest you are erring to the Lycra clad, religion exposing racing gang. Therefore 29 is the most appropriate wheel size

If you watch the DH World Cup red bull TV coverage or videos of folks having fun in baggy shorts then 650b is for you

Basically 29" is more efficient, 650b is more fun

The power meter question puts you firmly in the pain loving 29er camp

Last top tip is buy a bike you really love regardless of anything else because you'll ride it more and the bike you love riding is the right one
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby bychosis » Fri Dec 04, 2015 2:33 pm

mtb1011 wrote:you'd be surprised how much technical ability can really determine how fast you can get in and out of single track.


This. I'm an average punter in enduro events but with an MTB background. I can pick the roadies during events fairly easily. I'm all over them on single track and technical climbing, out-brake them at the bottom of descents but they always run away when the going gets easier and I can't pedal enough to keep up.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby mtb1011 » Fri Dec 04, 2015 2:57 pm

+1 true .... that's why we have a roadie as part of our training regime, you can't beat the long ks and long climbs you can do on roadie as fantastic training for mtb.

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby Calvin27 » Fri Dec 04, 2015 3:42 pm

My 2c (or $2 lol):

- MTB imo is about the corners speed, jumps and bumps. If you need a power meter you are doing it wrong unless you are racing competitively.
- If there is zero mtb experience to begin with, I'd start with flats so you can bail and to develop skills (bunny hopping etc.)
- Expect that bike to get thrashed and destroyed if there is a lwo level of mtb experience. I'd probably hire or buy a lower end bike. I've loaned my bike to riders who have some mtb experience and they almost always crash first few times out. I've learned to stop doing that now haha. But the point is unless you are not going to get too precious about your bike, then I'd maybe start with a hardtail. It also builds skills and lince choice.
- MTB kit imo is more sensitive than road bits. When roadies talk about compliance, I can barely fell the difference. When mtbrs talk about large/small and/or high/low speed compliance, I know exactly what the difference is. You will spend a lot of time tuning the bike to get it the way you want.
- Before you buy the bike make sure you are across XC, AM, DH, Enduro, Trail etc. The small geometry differences are huge in terms of the handling and climbing characteristics. Ride a lot of bikes and understand what type of mtb you want to do.
- Forget drivetrain spec. Drivetrains get smashed and worn faster than on raod.
- Budget for maintenance if you don't diy. MTBs cop a lot of stuff and need more attention than the roadie.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby trailgumby » Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:36 am

Power Meters:
I have one on my Scalpel, a Quarq S2275. I agree with the comments above that they are of limited usefulness. I bought mine to track training stress score, as I have a P2M on the roadie.

I reckon mine reads 25-30% low in the context of the entire ride's effort for the TSS score compared to road. The reason is mountain biking is a whole lot more physical with the upper body and core, and my heart rate stays a lot higher. hrTSS seems to match more closely the fatigue levels I experience on those occasions when the PM isn't giving a reading (flat battery - my unit usually dies about 15min after I get a low batt warning).

Why is that? On lots of terrain I'm actually propelling the bike forward without pedalling, using arms and legs and body weight to pump the bike forward the slope on the back sides of jumps and bumps to gain speed where possible, as well as weighting and unweighting the bike for cornering traction and momentum conservation over roots and rocks. That all expends effort that can't be captured by a power meter.

Anyway I'm much too busy to more than glance occasionally at the damn numbers while riding singletrack. ottom line: great on roadies, mountain bikes not so much. Invest the money in a carbon race day wheelset when the bug bites (as it will :D )

Suspension travel adn wheel size:
You're on the right track with a 100mm dually 29er. It's what most all of the fast guys I know ride. Although it depends on what you mean by "enduro" racing - if it is 100km XC events (the typical Australian understanding of the term until recently) then this is the ideal bike. While not as fast as a hardtail, they don't beat you up nearly as much and you'll be faster over the longer distance as you'll be more comfortable and fatigue less. 29ers dominate these events due to superior momentum conservation and more forgiving handling.

If it's the new Euro "Enduro" where it's multiple timed descending stages over the course of the day, and you ride yourself (untimed) up to the top of the next stage, then you need more travel, slacker geometry and probably 650B (27.5") wheels, although 29ers are more forgiving if you can find one with 150mm travel. I wouldn't think this would attract you for quite a few years as there is quite a steep skills curve necessary to climb to not just to do well but to survive.

A word to the wise - make sure you've got room in the frame to fit at least 1 full-sized waterbottle. Camelbaks are hot and heavy to race with, and putting nutrition in the bladders makes them go manky fast. Going bareback is so much more comfortable. I have a single seatpost mounted cage that I use for carrying a second bottle in longer point-to-point races - doubles like the Tri guys use are too bulky and you'll either snag your nuts on them or bash up the inside of your thighs as you have to get your backside off the saddle and down near the rear tyre on steep techy descents.

I have a "fun bike" as well that I share with my son with big sticky tyres, dropper seatpost and 130mm of travel, but it is noticeably slower.

Skills courses
Like the others, I find road bike riders really easy to pick at races. They fly up the fire trail climbs like I'd like to be able to, only to hold everyone up on the singletrack as they stress about every little rock and root. I've seen them even call out obstacles, pointing them out to their mates like it was a group ride and then grumble about the organisers leaving all the rocks on the race course :lol: ((AT) my third Mont 24hr)

A skills course will help you to not be that guy ;) You will even surprise a few people with your newly acquired skills, not to mention yourself as you start to relax and really enjoy the activity with a sense of flow.

Sorry about the novel. :oops: Does that all make sense?

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby bychosis » Sat Dec 05, 2015 8:42 am

If you haven't ridden MTB much before, or at all, then a skills course before/while you start out is probably a good thing. Learn how to do it right, without developing bad habits you need to undo first. Failing the skills course, get onto YouTube and check out how-to videos. Didn't have that when I started, had to learn the hard way.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby rangersac » Sat Dec 05, 2015 9:23 am

A lot of bike for a beginner but it's your coin so enjoy it! The only addition I would have to what others have said, is that if you are a total MTB novice, and intend on getting into trail riding that even just moderately technical, I would be wary of going with a carbon frame first up. You will bin it at some point, and there's less worry with an AL frame about taking a hit as the damage will be obvious.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby trailgumby » Sat Dec 05, 2015 10:53 am

If buying a carbon frame (or even an alloy one for that matter) I use and recommend Frameskin for protecting your bike from the inevitable rock strike.

It adds almost no weight, doesn't yellow with UV exposure like some of the cheap knockoff stuff (eg Birzman), and if applied with care and a hair dryer in accordance with the instructions, will last the life of the bike.

I wouldn't stress too much about buying a carbon frame. They're a lot tougher than most people think. You can be unlucky, but in that eventuality carbon is repairable - unlike aluminium.

Flat pedals are a really good idea starting out, but I'd recommend the appropriate sticky soled shoes as well plus a set of knee-shin guards as those pin spikes have a nasty bite.

If you're an experienced roadie you will be keen to get rid of flats as soon as possible. Besides being more efficient (don't have to exert pressure on the upstroke to keep your foot from coming off the pedal), mountain bike SPDs have a much wider range of tension than SPD SLs, and can be set pretty loose for easy entry and exit, and are double-sided.

I'm at the point where *not* using SPDs makes me feel nervous as I'm not securely connected to my bike and worry about my feet rattling off the pedals on the rough stuff and the bike dropping out from underneath me in the air. You can avoid the latter with technique of course, but

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby yanjarra » Mon Dec 07, 2015 12:38 pm

Hi all - thanks for the responses. I ended up going with the Lapierre…I know it’s a lot of bike for first time but knowing me I would of got upgrade-itis before long so thought it better to get something decent early; plus it seemed a very good deal. It weighs 11.5kg so shouldn’t be too bad weight wise I wouldn’t of thought…no doubt there’s room to bring that down too. Hopefully I can manage to not thrash it too much. It came with the Maxxis crossmark tyres on it which I’m led to believe are not the most aggressive tread pattern so not sure If I should just ride them until I get a new set or just swap them out straight off the bat.

I went out for my first ride on Friday and came off 3 times, over the bars twice…haha. All good, just scrapes and bruises, bike okay. So I certainly appreciate the sentiment a few of you guys expressed with regards to going fast is about technical ability and less so fitness…..it didn’t help me at all and I soon learnt I’m not as good a bike handler as I perhaps thought I was. Looking forward to the challenge of improving though.
The main thing I struggled with was going over the mounds and getting that weight back….landed on the front a couple of times which didn’t end nicely. Caught the bars on a tree another time. Seemed to have a bit of trouble with the pedals striking obstacles also, I think cornering may require a different technique to the road technique of one foot down and one up that im used too. Over some of the obstacles like logs and rocks I just didn’t seem to have enough clearance at times….maybe just need a bit more speed and to work on bunnyhoping a bit more. Are there any particularly good skill courses in Brisbane you guys know of?

Trailgumby- Yep, by “enduro” I meant long type of events like all day/100km challenge type of thing. After reading a bit more I see what you mean and it seems that’s not technically enduro riding and is perhaps best called marathon/long distance mtb’ing. I am definitely interested in xc type stuff at speed more than the downhill bombing type stuff at this stage.

Im interested in a few of the things you said as you seem to enjoy similar riding to myself. With regards the power meter that was my primary concern also…..keeping track of training stress. I mean if you do a couple of hard days out on the MTB without recording this in the PMC in golden cheetah or whatever than your formline is going to be inaccurate right? From what you are saying could I just record the training stress somehow from my heart rate numbers on the MTB rides and that would be sufficient?

In regards the pedals….you are right, it felt so unnatural and somewhat disconcerting to me being on the flats and felt like I had less control over the bike and was constantly fearful of slipping off/scraping a shinbone. I was initially thinking being on them for the first little bit would be the way to go just in regards to sticking the leg out if needed but now im thinking I might be better of just going clipless straight away…..what do you think?

What's the thoughts on dropper posts for this type of riding? Nice to have, essential, bad ?

Thanks again,
matt

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby ianganderton » Mon Dec 07, 2015 12:58 pm

yanjarra wrote:What's the thoughts on dropper posts for this type of riding? Nice to have, essential, bad ?


For xc there are better things to spend your money on. They add faff and weight

I did without one for 20odd years. I brought one in the end for big all day riding in the Alps with big ups and downs. I'm seriously considering taking it off for sydney based riding
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby silentbutdeadly » Mon Dec 07, 2015 2:30 pm

There's quite a few MTB skills course providers in SE Qld...google is your friend 'mtb skills brisbane'
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby rangersac » Mon Dec 07, 2015 2:50 pm

Sounds like you intend to focus on more XC style riding, in which case I'd definitely recommend clipless. As with trailgumby I don't feel happy being not being connected to the bike, as I find I have much more control when I'm clipped in. The only time I've used flats is for serious DH where it's quite handy having the ability to kick off obstacles. No need for a dropper either for this type of riding. Just go old school and get a quick release seat post clamp, and when you want to attack the steep stuff you can look the part!

You'll learn to get used to picking lines and controlling your pedalling so that strike is minimised, but this only comes from experience. Similarly obstacle clearing is about a certain amount of speed and being confident bunny hopping. As you sound like you are pretty new to mountain biking the most common mistake not having the momentum to get through the terrain. This is particularly relevant for dual suspension bikes, you get a nice plush ride but the trade off is some of your power/ momentum is lost from the shocks doing their thing.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby Calvin27 » Mon Dec 07, 2015 2:51 pm

yanjarra wrote: The main thing I struggled with was going over the mounds and getting that weight back….landed on the front a couple of times which didn’t end nicely. Caught the bars on a tree another time. Seemed to have a bit of trouble with the pedals striking obstacles also, I think cornering may require a different technique to the road technique of one foot down and one up that im used too. Over some of the obstacles like logs and rocks I just didn’t seem to have enough clearance at times….maybe just need a bit more speed and to work on bunnyhoping a bit more. Are there any particularly good skill courses in Brisbane you guys know of?

In regards the pedals….you are right, it felt so unnatural and somewhat disconcerting to me being on the flats and felt like I had less control over the bike and was constantly fearful of slipping off/scraping a shinbone. I was initially thinking being on them for the first little bit would be the way to go just in regards to sticking the leg out if needed but now im thinking I might be better of just going clipless straight away…..what do you think?


In terms of jumping and hopping etc. Youtube videos are great while you try to lock in some skills courses. Generaly you should try to start smaller first though. Like launching or jumping over little bumps. You should also not confuse jumping/hopping skills with line choice skills. You seem to be striking a lot of stuff which suggests you could probably do with better line choices. Suspension is good and corrects for a lot of these problems but unltimately line choice is very important for mtb. It sets up your jump so you don't end up in trees, allows you to take the corner through the right (and sometimes more stable) line, and ultimately it conserves energy and speed. A good idea is to follow some riders and observe their line choices, just don't follow someone that is awesome or you do what I do all the time and run off on stupid high drop offs ill prepared.

As for cornering, there are good youtubes. The general one foot down, one up works in mtb, but the reality is most roadies don't do this properly (some crit racers I have observed do it quite well though). The foot is only one part of the puzzle, the body position needs to be right as well. I could try to explain but I'd confuse you, myself and the thread, so just youtube it instead. It will feel wierd and unsafe the first few times but once you get the hang of it, you go much faster.

Lastly, with pedals, unless you are running some decent pedals, the stock ones are rubbish. Not sure what you have now, but a good pair of solid shoes (like skate shoes, or fiveten) and some pedals with deep sharp pins (recommend nukeproof electrons) will give you plenty of grip. If you feel you need to clip in to keep the bike stable, then it is likely there are technique problems to start with. Don't worry about the shin bones, after a while all the scars blend in.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby Duck! » Mon Dec 07, 2015 8:20 pm

yanjarra wrote:It came with the Maxxis crossmark tyres on it which I’m led to believe are not the most aggressive tread pattern so not sure If I should just ride them until I get a new set or just swap them out straight off the bat.

Tyre suitabilty really depends on the dirt you're riding on. All tyres are designed to perform at their best in particular conditions. It's true the Crossmark isn't a particularly aggressive tread. It's at its best on reasonably smooth hardpack surfaces, doesn't mind a bit of sand over the top, and is OK on rock. It suffers on loose, larger gravel where the fine tread just can't grip on the loose stones, and isn't particularly happy in the wet, unless it's fine sandy/gritty dirt, then the grip is heroic.

I'm not familiar with the flavour of dirt in your area, so can't tell you if they're in their preferred terrain or not.

Trailgumby- Yep, by “enduro” I meant long type of events like all day/100km challenge type of thing. After reading a bit more I see what you mean and it seems that’s not technically enduro riding and is perhaps best called marathon/long distance mtb’ing. I am definitely interested in xc type stuff at speed more than the downhill bombing type stuff at this stage.

The difference between Enduro (whether XC or Gravity) and marathon racing is primarily the course format. Enduro is based on a shortish lap, for XC typically around 10-15km, with races conducted to a set time; 3, 6, 12, whatever hours, while marathon racing is a long course, point to point or a single large loop, to a set distance.

Gravity Enduro, which is what the trendies are jumping on & referring to when they talk "Endooro" is still a time-based race format, but rather than the whole lap counting for race time, only the descent part is timed, but like XC Enduro, the goal is still to complete as many laps/runs in the allowed time as possible.
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby trailgumby » Mon Dec 07, 2015 8:56 pm

I'd stick with flats for awhile, going clipless too early did hold me back with skills acquisition as I was often too conservative in what I would choose to tackle. Get some shinguards, though! You can get some nasty wounds and from experience blood flow (and therefore healing) can be slow and difficult. Once you start to get a hankering to go racing, that is the time to go clipless.

With regard to the power meter, there's simply too much going on for you to be able to use it profitably while riding to monitor your efforts for intervals and the like. Save that stuff for your road sessions. where the surface is predictable and won't throw you over the bars if you miss your line by an inch.

I have Golden Cheetah and a TrainingPeaks account. I don't use GC that much, although it interesting to compare power curves from time to time. I like the TSS score on TP though. When I ride without recording power, it calculates a hrTSS that seems to be in the ballpark. As mentioned, I reckon the PM on the MTB generates a TSS that is about 25-30% low. I only use the PM to manage interval sessions on the roadie.

The actual wattage numbers (when I look) seem to tally with perceived exertion compared to the roadie, but you spend a lot less time pedalling and a lot more time expending effort managing the bike and yourself over obstacles. A few of my elite level buddies had PMs 0n their MTB's but took them off. I haven't yet as it's only a 50g penalty over my stock carbon cranks.

Some of my buddies do ride with a dropper post. I haven't been able to come to grips with copping the weight penalty yet (Oh noes, I'm a weight weenie! :lol:). I have a Reverb I haven't fitted to my Scalpel. They have commented and I have noticed with my trail bike (which does have a dropper and is built like a tank) that by dropping the post through fast twisty descending sections where it's too fast/twisty/techy to pedal, lowering your CG does allow for faster, more agile and confident cornering, so could be worth the weight penalty depending on the course (eg, Mount Stromlo).

If you're in Sydney I'd be happy to spend a couple of hours with you running you through some skills fundamentals. I've done it for a couple of forum members, and I think they found it helpful (or maybe they were just being polite!) Message me if you are interested.

Failing that, MTBTips.com has a great series of videos and he's really good at breaking things down into simple memorable steps that you can turn into drills and practice.

One more thing - practice does NOT make perfect. Practice makes permanent. So therefore you need to make sure you practice the right things. His vids are a really good start. Live one-on-one coaching or a skills course with attentive trainers are best, though.
Last edited by trailgumby on Mon Dec 07, 2015 9:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby adam0bmx0 » Tue Dec 08, 2015 4:25 pm

Matt,

I'm a roadie who's also just bought a MTB! Been out once so far around Gap Creek. If you're free mid-week give me a shout and we can head out.

Not been on a MTB for about 8 years, but having previously raced DH back in the UK as a teen, its all become familiar again. :mrgreen:

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AUbicycles
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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby AUbicycles » Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:24 pm

A skills tip I will share is to choose a technical trail, perhaps one you already know and set up a few challenges, for example rather than race around challenge yourself to complete without putting your feet down. You can stop and repeat sections / obstacles which helps choosing good lines and honing your technique.

Another challenge is to take the difficult line and use this to practice your skills. And away from the trails, in the local urban streets, practice curb jumping and riding up and down obstacles like rocks. It's all about practice.

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Re: roadie looking to buy 1st MTB - a few q's

Postby koshari » Mon Dec 14, 2015 10:03 pm

do you blokes cop much Arm Pump on MTBs? its always the 1st thing i cop when i go out on my KDX after an extended absence.
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