Is it only a matter of time?

Equipment and On Road Behaviour, Laws and Rules. Cycling Promotion and Advocacy

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby trailgumby » Mon Nov 07, 2011 12:01 pm

The Theory of BIG, or How to Claim Your Space On the Road:

http://www.tibsnjoan.co.uk/Big.html

+1 to sogood's comment on the probability of being hit, it does not accumulate over time.
"People have a right to their own opinions, but not their own facts. Evidence must be located, not created, and opinions not backed by evidence cannot be given much weight." -- James W Loewen

http://www.facebook.com/Drive2WorkDay
User avatar
trailgumby
 
Posts: 10204
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:30 pm
Location: Northern Beaches, Sydney

by BNA » Mon Nov 07, 2011 12:06 pm

BNA
 

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby rustychisel » Mon Nov 07, 2011 12:06 pm

Rider123 wrote:When you speaking of riding 'big' and assertively, what exactly do you mean?

I normally ride on 2-lane, 3-lane roads (i.e. Cantebury Rd) and when i do so i ride in the left-hand lane (obviously). However, i position myself so i am basically in line with the left wheel of a following car. I try to 'encourage' drivers indirectly to change lanes to get past me and so often is the case. Is that being too 'big' on the road or not 'big' enough?

Thanks


I would say, as you do. Obviously conditions vary but when taking the lane is justified then that is what I do. I suspect you're doing it right. No way am I going to be shoved off into the door zone [kill zone] when someone has one or 2 other lanes to choose from.

Big - in the UK there's a whole school of thought and published opinion on the theory of BIG which is largely correct IMO, if not a slightly longwinded way of making the point. Be big, be seen, assert your right and presence. [ahh, trailgumby's just added a link. Many thanks]

In Adelaide I regularly ride through our biggest, hairiest roundabouts [it's only that because Australian drivers often have no idea how to negotiate an RAB] where 5 roads intersect at the Britannia Hotel. The way to get through is psychological - sit up in the saddle, hands on brake levers, elbows slightly out, head up and looking for trouble or challenges. The posture is unmistakable: even THINK of getting in my way and I'm coming in through the windscreen to rip your throat out!!! As a cyclist you have few defenses, so psychology is important; if you look uncertain, or unsure of where you're going then car drivers will, without another thought, push past or pull out in front of you. I point lane changes and turns clearly, aggressively marking my space so there can be no misunderstanding. etc etc
rustychisel
 
Posts: 3346
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:39 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby Marto » Mon Nov 07, 2011 2:49 pm

rustychisel wrote:
human909 wrote:
I've faced plenty of stupid drivers that haven't been looking where they were going. But I haven't been hit because I have been observant, cautious and ready for anything.

If you dismiss it all as a game of chance then your are not helping yourself. Recognise that nearly all incidents ARE avoidable if YOU behave in the right way! Don't passively accept the dangers out there. Actively avoid them!


(I'm not trying to blame the victim here. I just saying there is things you can do to prevent accidents that are cause by others.)



Not sure if I totally agree with you on this, but mostly.

Be clear about your intentions, ride BIG, be assertive etc. I've been riding on roads for 40+ years and never been hit by another vehicle. All accidents have been entirely my fault or mechanicals, except the once when a fellow cyclist swerved into road bumps whilst I was on his wheel. Maybe a 50/50 deal.

1978 - riding to school - rear derailleur and chain disntegrated as I was sprinting through a busy intersection. Slid through the intersection, bloody but substantially unhurt
1979 - that bus I was drafting stopped a little too suddenly. Front wheel hit rear bumper at about 10kmh and the forks folded gracefully backward. No injuries.
1980 - riding to uni - front wheel tacoed in a pothole on Payneham Road - slid down the road from 50kmh to 0khm, looked up and saw a car bumper bar stopped less than a metre from my head. Blood, grazes, substantially unhurt
1980 - finished a hard effort to Morialta Falls carpark, leaned back, hands off bars. Alloy seatpost sheared, I landed on the remains and then bounced onto the back wheel, which collapsed. There was blood, pain, a visit or two to the doctor
1984 - riding to play soccer with friends - wet day, wet drain cover. Slid, tore up my chin pretty badly.
2000 - descending Montacute Road solo, took sweeping left too hot at about 50kmh, went wide, endoed over a rock, smashed helmet all through the rear, scrapes and bruises
2003 - new bike - hit paint line on wet morning, slip. Chipped humerus. Extremely painful
2004 - hit road bump at about 45kmh as above, broken collar bone etc


And you keep cycling.
.Image
Image
User avatar
Marto
 
Posts: 1327
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:08 am
Location: Brisbane

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby rustychisel » Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:57 pm

huh? Not sure I get it. :D :D :D :D

Obviously it's my skills need polishing, not my balls. :roll:

But, to be honest, these are mostly self-inflicted wounds and I understand and accept the risks. I'm lucky, and count myself lucky in that the major accidents have been brief bouts of pain. I have a friend who dumped it in the Hills a year ago and she's only just got the all clear to get back on the bike from what could easily have been a fatal accident. Cycling is a dangerous enough activity because of the high speeds attained and the lack of protection afforded the cyclist. It can become a very painful incident very quickly. I try, as much as possible, to minimise the other variables (other vehicles on the road, for instance). So far I've been pretty good at doing so, but if your point is that the list is rather extensive, looking at it like that, I agree. But then again, pretty sure there's a couple I forgot..

1977 - Kangaroo Island - cycling tour 1st night - midnight near Parndana, hit rear of fellow cyclist (idiot) who stopped in middle of road to check directions. 12 stitches in right knee and end of cycling holiday. Maybe 50/50
rustychisel
 
Posts: 3346
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:39 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby miml » Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:20 pm

Today. Was Trying to overtake a Car awaiting to reverse Parallel parking.

Turn my head , figured no cars behind ill cross over the tram track and overtake the car.

Next thing i know my front wheel slipped into the track, despite the fact I TURN WITH CAUTIONS AND with about 25 degree.

Yet my front wheel still managed to slipped, Must be the tyre.... I blame the front tyre.

As ive been doing this on my other bike with no problems.

Anyone ever feel off when they try to manoeuvre over the tram tracks?

Cheers
miml
 
Posts: 248
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 12:00 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby Mulger bill » Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:53 pm

Nicely put Rustychisel, it is about riding the fine line between assertive and arrogant. Smokeboxers are like dogs, they can sense fear.
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25577
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby csy75 » Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:36 pm

il padrone wrote:In all honesty I really believe the longer you have been cycling (= more experience) the lower your risk of a collision is going to be.

I agree with this...first two weeks of riding i had a woman not give way at a roundabout...i wasnt setup for it... close call. I also ran a red and nearly got t-boned by a car...I've never done either again. experience helps
User avatar
csy75
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 8:03 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby human909 » Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:42 pm

csy75 wrote: I also ran a red and nearly got t-boned by a car...I've never done either again. experience helps


I'm not trying to judge...

I am just curious what drove you to run a red light in front of a car? Did you not see it, not look?

(I've occasionally gone through reds when there hasn't been a car in sight.)
human909
 
Posts: 4728
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 10:48 am

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby sogood » Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:55 pm

csy75 wrote:
il padrone wrote:In all honesty I really believe the longer you have been cycling (= more experience) the lower your risk of a collision is going to be.

I agree with this...first two weeks of riding i had a woman not give way at a roundabout...i wasnt setup for it... close call. I also ran a red and nearly got t-boned by a car...I've never done either again. experience helps

The other tack against this is that as one gains more experience and stick to a routine, one also tends to become more complacent.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16927
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby Myddraal » Mon Nov 07, 2011 9:26 pm

Apart from the obvious stacks doing tricks as a kid, I've only had one actual crash, which was in my first 100kms riding around Sydney on a road bike.

Coming down a hill at about 40 to a green light, I was far enough behind the cars in front that I was safe, but I was doing the polite thing as it was a 60 zone and keeping to the left I wasn't far enough back to be properly visible. A bloke heading in the other direction waiting to turn right didn't see me and turned across in front of me. I t-boned his passenger door. I got out of it pretty lightly; bent my drops out at 45°, buckled front wheel, a few bruises and a broken thumb and ring finger. Also got to spend the afternoon in hospital as a lady called an ambulance, which in hindsight was good as it meant my broken thumb was diagnosed straight away.

It put me out of training for 3 months though which was a bit of a nuisance, but lesson learned and I haven't really had a close call in >1000kms even riding on the main roads.
Myddraal
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2010 2:13 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby DavidS » Mon Nov 07, 2011 10:56 pm

queequeg wrote:
My own experience, I have been hit by a car once, and at the time I was cycling on a dedicated cycle path! I got t-boned by a car exiting a driveway at speed, failing to stop and check the pedestrian footpath (first), then continuing and failing to check either direction of the bi-directional dedicated cyclepath. Just plain dumbness on the part of the driver. How many kms I had done or how long I had been cycling were not factors. All it takes is one stupid driver not looking where they are going.


You know the same thing happened to me many years ago. I was going along a reserved part of the road when a car (well, a taxi) just came straight out in front of me without looking as he assumed there was no vehicle in the reserved part of the road where cars aren't allowed. One fundamental difference in my case though: the reserved part of the road was not a bike path but tram tracks and I was driving a tram not riding a bike. He left in a tow truck with a written off car, I drove off having lost a coat of paint :lol:

DS
Image

Riding: Cannondale Quick Speed 2
User avatar
DavidS
 
Posts: 1313
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:24 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby Oxford » Tue Nov 08, 2011 5:15 am

DavidS wrote:... He left in a tow truck with a written off car, I drove off having lost a coat of paint :lol:

DS

Image
Life is not about waiting for the rain to pass.....it's about learning to dance (or ride) in the rain.
- anonymous
User avatar
Oxford
 
Posts: 4777
Joined: Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:49 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby jules21 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:51 am

miml wrote:Anyone ever feel off when they try to manoeuvre over the tram tracks?

never fallen. 2 things may cause falls on tram tracks:
1. reliance on the tyre to grip the road surface (steel tram track) while turning (i.e. leaning your bike). it won't grip and you'll fall.

lesson: be very careful when cornering over tram tracks, particularly in the wet. try to avoid altogether by 'squaring off' the tracks - i.e. riding straight over them at an oblique angle.

2. 'tram lining' - when you cross the tram tracks at a shallow angle and the front tyre decides that it quite enjoys staying on the steel tracks - you lose steering and crash.

lesson: don't cross tracks at a shallow angle.

i choose from 2 techniques to avoid these hazards:
1. pull a small mono over each track, or
2. when crossing at a shallow angle (i.e. riding in the same direction as the tracks), get out of the seat and 'whip' the bike sideways over the tracks - the bike isn't relying on the tyre to grip the tracks as it passes over them, so it won't slip.

also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.
Image
User avatar
jules21
 
Posts: 8560
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:14 pm
Location: deep in the pain cave

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby human909 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:05 am

jules21 wrote:i choose from 2 techniques to avoid these hazards:
1. pull a small mono over each track, or
2. when crossing at a shallow angle (i.e. riding in the same direction as the tracks), get out of the seat and 'whip' the bike sideways over the tracks - the bike isn't relying on the tyre to grip the tracks as it passes over them, so it won't slip.

also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.


Good advice.

Tram tracks are fine if you know how to handle them.
human909
 
Posts: 4728
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 10:48 am

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby miml » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:22 am

jules21 wrote:
miml wrote:Anyone ever feel off when they try to manoeuvre over the tram tracks?

never fallen. 2 things may cause falls on tram tracks:
1. reliance on the tyre to grip the road surface (steel tram track) while turning (i.e. leaning your bike). it won't grip and you'll fall.

lesson: be very careful when cornering over tram tracks, particularly in the wet. try to avoid altogether by 'squaring off' the tracks - i.e. riding straight over them at an oblique angle.

2. 'tram lining' - when you cross the tram tracks at a shallow angle and the front tyre decides that it quite enjoys staying on the steel tracks - you lose steering and crash.

lesson: don't cross tracks at a shallow angle.

i choose from 2 techniques to avoid these hazards:
1. pull a small mono over each track, or
2. when crossing at a shallow angle (i.e. riding in the same direction as the tracks), get out of the seat and 'whip' the bike sideways over the tracks - the bike isn't relying on the tyre to grip the tracks as it passes over them, so it won't slip.

also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.

exactly what you said, I learnt the hard way. It's the front wheel, that decided to slip it in.

I've got road rashes now and was thinking how long I have to put off my training.
Grrrr , can't wait to ride again....

Thanks for the tips. I'll make sure I learn how to 'whip' the bike sideways.

It's amazing that you have never fallen and know all this techniques. I myself do not have the luxury of friends who are willing to teach me a thing or 2.
miml
 
Posts: 248
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 12:00 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby human909 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:44 am

miml wrote:It's amazing that you have never fallen and know all this techniques. I myself do not have the luxury of friends who are willing to teach me a thing or 2.


Its about knowing and understanding grip and bike dynamics.

Many cyclists, just like many motorists, just operate in a cocoon expecting the vehicle to go where the steering input tells it to. You need to be aware of the limited grip of your tyres and what causes the limits of that grip to be exceeded. On BV forums I've had cyclists try to argue that tram tracks are a game of chance and sometimes it is impossible not to slip. :roll:

When riding parallel to tram tracks in the wet then whipping the bike across is extremely important.

miml wrote:Next thing i know my front wheel slipped into the track, despite the fact I TURN WITH CAUTIONS AND with about 25 degree.

Yet my front wheel still managed to slipped, Must be the tyre.... I blame the front tyre.


It's not the tyre. Not only do you need to be careful about the angle you need to be careful about the turn. Essentially you want to keep the turn (and thus the lean) as minimal as possible when crossing the tracks.

Furthermore were you seated? Bad idea. No suspension. Stand up and be soft over the bumps and your bike will grip far better. Always stand off your seat if you are manoeuvring over anything bumpy.
human909
 
Posts: 4728
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 10:48 am

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby csy75 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:03 am

human909 wrote:
csy75 wrote: I also ran a red and nearly got t-boned by a car...I've never done either again. experience helps


I'm not trying to judge...

I am just curious what drove you to run a red light in front of a car? Did you not see it, not look?

(I've occasionally gone through reds when there hasn't been a car in sight.)



didn't see it and didn't look...assumption...the mother of all f ups.......let's just say i was very laissez faire with my attitude to cycling...then
User avatar
csy75
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 8:03 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby il padrone » Tue Nov 08, 2011 7:26 pm

jules21 wrote:also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.

A mate of mine with his collarbone broken at Kew Junction's tram tracks can assure you, the rear tyre does matter :(
Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 18188
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby csy75 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 7:46 pm

what about this if we were to play devils advocate? re: claiming lane?


129 Keeping to the far left side of a road
(1) A driver on a road (except a multi-lane road) must drive as near as practicable to the far left side of the road.
Note Multi-lane road is defined in the dictionary.
(2) This rule does not apply to the rider of a motor bike.
Note Motor bike is defined in the dictionary.
(3) In this rule:
road does not include a road-related area.
Note Road-related area includes the shoulder of a road — see rule 13.

130 Keeping to the left on a multi-lane road
(1) This rule applies to a driver driving on a multi-lane road if:
(a) the speed-limit applying to the driver for the length of
road where the driver is driving is over 80 kilometres
per hour; or
(b) a keep left unless overtaking sign applies to the length
of road where the driver is driving.
User avatar
csy75
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 8:03 pm

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby il padrone » Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:28 pm

Yes. Many on here are well aware of those rules*. Your point is....?




* The rules re. claiming the lane can be more clearly stated as follows.

Claiming necessary lane space is:
1. always legally possible (in any lane) on multi-lane roads that have speed limits of 80kmh or below
2. still legal on 90+kmh speed limit multi-lane roads, but only in the left lane, unless you are turning right.
3. legally possible on two-lane roads, where keeping left is impracticable (ie. unsafe or not possible for some reason) in the judgement of the cyclist.
Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 18188
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby trailgumby » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:43 pm

human909 wrote:Furthermore were you seated? Bad idea. No suspension. Stand up and be soft over the bumps and your bike will grip far better. Always stand off your seat if you are manoeuvring over anything bumpy.

+ 300,000. It's just so fundamental. Mountain Biking 101. Pedals horizontal at 9am and 3pm position. AKA the "Attack position".

il padrone wrote:
jules21 wrote:also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.

A mate of mine with his collarbone broken at Kew Junction's tram tracks can assure you, the rear tyre does matter :(

You'd have to be unlucky, though. Most of the time the rear will step out and then step back if you have enough momentum and you're not attempting something like a high angle of lean in a turn.
"People have a right to their own opinions, but not their own facts. Evidence must be located, not created, and opinions not backed by evidence cannot be given much weight." -- James W Loewen

http://www.facebook.com/Drive2WorkDay
User avatar
trailgumby
 
Posts: 10204
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:30 pm
Location: Northern Beaches, Sydney

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby DavidS » Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:21 pm

jules21 wrote:
miml wrote:Anyone ever feel off when they try to manoeuvre over the tram tracks?

never fallen. 2 things may cause falls on tram tracks:
1. reliance on the tyre to grip the road surface (steel tram track) while turning (i.e. leaning your bike). it won't grip and you'll fall.

lesson: be very careful when cornering over tram tracks, particularly in the wet. try to avoid altogether by 'squaring off' the tracks - i.e. riding straight over them at an oblique angle.

2. 'tram lining' - when you cross the tram tracks at a shallow angle and the front tyre decides that it quite enjoys staying on the steel tracks - you lose steering and crash.

lesson: don't cross tracks at a shallow angle.

i choose from 2 techniques to avoid these hazards:
1. pull a small mono over each track, or
2. when crossing at a shallow angle (i.e. riding in the same direction as the tracks), get out of the seat and 'whip' the bike sideways over the tracks - the bike isn't relying on the tyre to grip the tracks as it passes over them, so it won't slip.

also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.


Yep, the only time I've come off the bike since returning to riding in a big way a couple of years ago was stuffing up a tram track crossing. My front wheel caught and I went over. Not fun. Still, I felt more in control than when I drove a tram off the tracks once ;)

DS
Image

Riding: Cannondale Quick Speed 2
User avatar
DavidS
 
Posts: 1313
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:24 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby Downhill » Wed Nov 09, 2011 12:33 am

I've got one to add to the pile.

Hit by a car from behind. I have no clear recollection of the accident except for the fraction of a second between becoming airborne and hitting the windscreen. That seemed like minutes... From what I've been able to reconstruct, I signaled to cross to the centre line for a right hand turn, did a quick head check, but just didn't perceive the vehicle before moving over. Fractured skull, 60 + stitches, two weeks in hospital plus skin grafts. It was a long time ago but it was a lesson I only needed to learn once.

I've had a couple of other scrapes but nothing out of the ordinary. On several occasions I've been squeezed into the kerb by motorists (and buses) trying to turn left. Now I take a little more of the road so that they can see I'm going straight forward. I had one major OTHB courtesy of a sand drift at the bottom of a downhill run. Fortunately sand is softer than tarmac.

The moral of the story: Stay alert, keep your speed appropriate to the traffic conditions, don't cycle too close to the kerb, signal clearly, and check twice before changing lanes.
Today's effort = Tomorrows reward.
2010 Oppy C6
Downhill
 
Posts: 355
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 1:11 am
Location: WA

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby jules21 » Wed Nov 09, 2011 9:29 am

trailgumby wrote:
il padrone wrote:
jules21 wrote:also remember it's the front tyre that matters - don't worry about what the rear does.

A mate of mine with his collarbone broken at Kew Junction's tram tracks can assure you, the rear tyre does matter :(

You'd have to be unlucky, though. Most of the time the rear will step out and then step back if you have enough momentum and you're not attempting something like a high angle of lean in a turn.

+ 1

i was oversimplifying - the rear matters, but it's a lot less important than the front. the primary risk is when inexperienced riders over-react to a rear wheel (or any) slide with violent steering inputs, which will bring you down. just ignore it, relax, let it squirm around behind you and you'll usually be right. same principle for controlling a car (not on public roads).
Image
User avatar
jules21
 
Posts: 8560
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:14 pm
Location: deep in the pain cave

Re: Is it only a matter of time?

Postby master6 » Wed Nov 09, 2011 1:40 pm

il padrone wrote:Yes. Many on here are well aware of those rules*. Your point is....?




* The rules re. claiming the lane can be more clearly stated as follows.

Claiming necessary lane space is:
1. always legally possible (in any lane) on multi-lane roads that have speed limits of 80kmh or below
2. still legal on 90+kmh speed limit multi-lane roads, but only in the left lane, unless you are turning right.
3. legally possible on two-lane roads, where keeping left is impracticable (ie. unsafe or not possible for some reason) in the judgement of the cyclist.


il padrone, I am in no position to disagree with you, as frankly I dont know what is provided by law, however are you able to advise where we would find the provisiions you have described (which seem reasonable to me)
master6
 
Posts: 2649
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:37 pm
Location: depends on who is asking, and why.

PreviousNext

Return to Cycling Safety and Advocacy

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Shred11



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter