advice after a major incident

ironhanglider
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Re: advice after a major incident

Postby ironhanglider » Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:28 pm

Scintilla wrote:OWN your lane!! The road rules across Australia are very clear that you are NOT required to keep to the left on any multi-lane road with a speed limit of 80 kmh or less.


https://vimeo.com/38295907


BTW, IF the truck driver's account was correct and you hit the rear of his truck....... how did he know that there had been a collision :?: :?:


And why didn't you change lanes to overtake? On second thought why were you travelling at 80km/h? :twisted:

If the truckie saw you get hit then that would suggest he was watching you in his mirror, which prompts me to ask why would he do that? One explanation would be that he knew that he was too close, certainly less than the 1.5m.

Cheers,

Cameron
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human909
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Re: advice after a major incident

Postby human909 » Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:32 pm

Scintilla wrote:OWN your lane!!


I completely agree. But sometimes easier said than done.

Time and time again we are being browbeaten into hugging the gutter and riding single file. This includes people on this forum, police, road authorities and even some cycling advocacy groups. (SCA)

Not to forget all the hatred in the media and on the roads. Motorists honking, abusing or threatening you if you have the temerity of riding in a lane of traffic. It is ever present and happens all the time.

Scintilla
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Re: advice after a major incident

Postby Scintilla » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:50 pm

Over the years (and increasingly so) I have found that in all sorts of situations, it is most often the safest thing to do to Ride Wider; Stay Safer! By doing this, riding centre of the lane, in heavy traffic areas, constrained lanes, and even on 70 kmh roads, the following traffic sees that they have no room to share a lane, and they..... change lane to pass.

I almost NEVER get any aggro or abuse.

Simple really. What they would do for any other slow-moving vehicle.

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familyguy
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Location: Cremorne, NSW

Re: advice after a major incident

Postby familyguy » Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:45 pm

Scintilla wrote:BTW, IF the truck driver's account was correct and you hit the rear of his truck....... how did he know that there had been a collision :?: :?:


^This. Something irked me about your description, too. When I read this just now I realised that was it. Unless someone drove after him, stopped him and told him, he must have been checking his mirror. As often happens, someone claims they didnt see you, close shaves you, but clearly sees you give them the finger or an angry wave after they have passed you.

Jim

Bennoz
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Re: advice after a major incident

Postby Bennoz » Fri Aug 10, 2018 11:15 am

so bit of an update:
ive been calling the cop shop to try and find out what actually happened, seeing as they did take statements from a number of people.
first 2 times i got fobbed off, with the person i spoke to saying he would leave a message for the investigating officer to call me back...am still waiting for that call

the 3rd time i called, i managed to get some detail from the person on the phone. They read through the file and summarized it for me. Basically nothing has happened since the incident. the police couldnt determine who was at fault. no charges or fines were handed out.

truth be told, im more than a little disappointed. Even by the truck drivers own admission (where i apparently hit him), that would mean he was too close - so much for the minimum passing law

Anyway, am trying to put it all behind me now and move on.

hardest part has been the mental side of things. Ive probably replayed the incident in my head a million times and think about it daily. The anxiety of getting back on the bike was something ive never experienced before - one of my mates mentioned PTSD, he prob not far off. Friends and family have been really supportive as well

Home and contents insurance covered all my equipment, and yes the bike was a writeoff. Ive got a nice new bike (upgraded ha ) and starting to ride in the morning again. Getting back out there has been a huge help. Plus im focusing on my original goal of riding LeTape this year. time to start training!!!

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g-boaf
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Re: advice after a major incident

Postby g-boaf » Fri Aug 10, 2018 12:40 pm

Bennoz wrote:so bit of an update:
ive been calling the cop shop to try and find out what actually happened, seeing as they did take statements from a number of people.
first 2 times i got fobbed off, with the person i spoke to saying he would leave a message for the investigating officer to call me back...am still waiting for that call

the 3rd time i called, i managed to get some detail from the person on the phone. They read through the file and summarized it for me. Basically nothing has happened since the incident. the police couldnt determine who was at fault. no charges or fines were handed out.

truth be told, im more than a little disappointed. Even by the truck drivers own admission (where i apparently hit him), that would mean he was too close - so much for the minimum passing law

Anyway, am trying to put it all behind me now and move on.

hardest part has been the mental side of things. Ive probably replayed the incident in my head a million times and think about it daily. The anxiety of getting back on the bike was something ive never experienced before - one of my mates mentioned PTSD, he prob not far off. Friends and family have been really supportive as well

Home and contents insurance covered all my equipment, and yes the bike was a writeoff. Ive got a nice new bike (upgraded ha ) and starting to ride in the morning again. Getting back out there has been a huge help. Plus im focusing on my original goal of riding LeTape this year. time to start training!!!


Yes, focus on L'Etape - and enjoy riding with other people in the club you mentioned you are riding with. It's just bad luck what happened. Being worried about getting back on the bike after a big accident like that is normal, even very experienced top level riders go through that too.

Best of luck in your training for L'Etape.

uart
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Location: Newcastle

Re: advice after a major incident

Postby uart » Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:56 pm

Bennoz wrote:hardest part has been the mental side of things. Ive probably replayed the incident in my head a million times and think about it daily. The anxiety of getting back on the bike was something ive never experienced before


It might help to go and cycle that section again for a few early morning rides. Concentrate on really claiming the lane right back from about the set of traffic lights prior to where the incident happened. If for any reason you cannot claim the lane there (too much traffic density or whatever) then just stop and take the cycle crossing at Anzac.

Conquering this spot, so to speak, might help you overcome the bad memories.

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